Japanese Sword Value???

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by smoke, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. smoke

    smoke

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    I have what appears to be a WW2 Japanese Sword that was supposedly brought back by a GI during that time period. The blade is in good shape, the sheath is in good shape, but the handle is in serious need of repair.

    From the over-all looks of it, I'd say it is a Japanese Military sword as the sheath has a single attachment point, the sword has a spring type button lock that locks the sword into the sheath, and the sheath has a cap on the end. I thought at first it was a Japanese Military NCO Sword, but after doing a little research, I've determined it is not.

    The blade tang is marked on both sides. I've looked at several websites, but can't find one that actually interprets the markings. I'd like to find out what it is, what it's worth and if it would be worth the $ to get the handle restored.

    Any help would be appreciated. I pretty sure it's not a fake.
     
  2. Hackett

    Hackett

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    pics?

    Also, don't try to fix it, and a light coat of mineral oil on the blade about once a year. very light though.
     

  3. smoke

    smoke

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    I'll try to get pics tomorrow. The handle is basically destroyed - the wrapping is gone and the wood is all busted up. I have almost every splinter of the busted wood, the underlayment material and I think all the hardware except maybe 1 pin/screw.
     
  4. eisman

    eisman ARGH! CLM

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  5. Halojumper

    Halojumper

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    The Japanese WWII military swords are not rare and, consequently, not nearly as valuable as the actual Samurai ones. Their quality is similar to most military bayonets. That said, they are still more valuable than the reproductions. Look around your area to see if there are any collectors. You could get a could deal, but in that arena, it could be real easy to get overly optimistic about a purchase.
     
  6. Gonzoso

    Gonzoso

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    I saw something on tv where they were assessing the value of a Japanese military sword. Some of them were privately owned by the soldier and traditionally crafted(valuable) swords. But many times the traditional sword had to be cut down(the handle end:) to fit military specifications. The handle end of the steel is where the maker would mark the sword identifying its origin. If the steel under the handle bears the legible name of a maker(you would need an expert to check) then it could be very valuable. If this data has been cut off it is not identifiable and therefore not as valuable.
     
  7. SteadyGlock

    SteadyGlock

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    Not to kill the excitement, but do yourself a favor now and start by assuming it's either a total fake or a decent replica. There's been so much popularity for these things in the last 20 years, and the guys who manufacture fakes and replicas have gotten really REALLY good at what they do. With that said....

    The next step would be to go through as many low cost appraisals as possible. Do your research, get lots of feedback. Eventually you should be able to get an honest, realistic idea of what you have. As far as collectibles are concerned, the Japanese sword is a sticky, complicated mess. Lots of people get screwed in the transactions with these things, and you need to proceed with caution. But you should do what it takes to find out what you have. Good luck.
     
  8. Kozel

    Kozel

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    There was one on that Pawn Stars show on History.

    They said that after WWII there was more Samurai swords in US then in Japan. If it was Japanese officer sword it was probably cut down (to regulation size) version of traditional sword. They lost most of the value by doing that. Only uncut, traditional swords worth good money.
     
  9. k594

    k594

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    get some steel wool and clean it with some metal polish... it will be worth more . :whistling:
     
  10. Kuroineko

    Kuroineko

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    Why didn't you tell him to take a file to the edge to sharpen it. :rofl:
     
  11. k594

    k594

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    everyone knows its better to use an stone and some oil to get the proper edge on it! :wavey:
     
  12. DScottHewitt

    DScottHewitt EMT-B

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    DO NOT JUMP TO CONCLUSIONS!!!!!

    An ARFCOM member has one in the family. {His Granddad got it off a North Korean who apparently got it off a Japanese officer.} It was in the World War II military fitting, but the blade turned out to be from like the 1700s or earlier, and is worth $10,000+

    The link is in my bookmarks on the laptop, unfortunately.
     
  13. DScottHewitt

    DScottHewitt EMT-B

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    +87


    Polishing/sharpening is done by EXPERTS and costs around $1,000 for a pro to do it for a reason.
     
  14. DScottHewitt

    DScottHewitt EMT-B

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    With the tang having the Kanji on both sides it is either a true a collector's item old blade or a modern fake, IIRC. I do not believe the tangs were marked on the military WWII blades. IIRC

    Seriously, if the OP has an ARFCOM account, there are actual experts on there. The thread about the good blade the guy had went like four or five pages.
     
  15. DScottHewitt

    DScottHewitt EMT-B

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    PLEASE do not give such false information. The OP might not know you are joking.
     
  16. m2hmghb

    m2hmghb

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    I should probably get some pictures of the one I've got. My grandmother got it from a man who she dated, who got it off a Japenese officer. Would be interesting to find out the value.
     
  17. Rashid.4v

    Rashid.4v

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  18. DScottHewitt

    DScottHewitt EMT-B

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    It's been eight hours. He might not have meant first thing this morning when he said he would try to get pics "Tomorrow."



    :supergrin::supergrin::supergrin::supergrin:
     
  19. W. Fargo

    W. Fargo

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    I am actually a bit of a fanatic Nihonto collector myself.
    I would most definately advise you to post your question and any possible pics of tang (nakago) length (nagasa) and any other information on "nihontomessageboard.com". If the mei (signature) is still visible the guys on this forum can let you know if it is a showato (sword made for war, mostly machine made and not from tamahagane, japanese iron)
    Also if you see a small stamp on the upper side of the tang that is usually an indication that it is a sword made for the war.
    Also the patina/rust on the tang can give you some indication with regards to age. If it is very dark rust and the yasurime (file markings) on the tang are no longer visible, it is most likely an older sword.

    The chance that you have a true Nihonto (Japanese art sword) is small, but it most definately happens that true nihonto have WWII Koshirae (mountings)

    Good luck, post your pics and questions on Nihontomessageboard.com and all will be fine....

    J.W.