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IT Guys

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Calico Jack, May 28, 2012.

  1. Calico Jack

    Calico Jack NO QUARTER

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    I've been throwing around the idea of going back to school and studying for a degree in Information and Computer Technology. From all that I can find the job market looks rather promising.

    What type of background in computer technology did you have before you decided to choose this area of study?

    I don't have an extensive background in computer technology, but it is something that I find very interesting.

    Do you need a master's degree to get a job in IT or is this a career that allows advancement with only a bachelor's?
     
  2. FL Airedale

    FL Airedale Dog Breath

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    For the last 15 years, I've been working in IT for a college. You can definitely have a career in IT with a bachelor's. A master's certainly wouldn't hurt. Some IT management positions require a master's.

    I've known a number of people that got into IT with a bachelor's and got their master's by working on their degree part time. Some companies and educational institutions will pay the tuition for that master's while you are working for them.
     

  3. jtmac

    jtmac Señor Member

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    "IT" has quite a range of meaning. It ranges from using computer science (math) to do actual engineering to maintaining networks to just fixing computers.

    Generally speaking, a degree in Information Technology doesn't mean much, and any bachelor's degree will do if you can prove you have the knowledge. You should really only be concerned with getting a degree specifically in Information Technology if you're in college to study IT and that's the degree your coursework leads to. You still need a Bachelor's to safely break into the field today. I wish it was because we've created standards of learning for the field, but it isn't. No, it's just because in today's job market there are enough people that have degrees that people who have no clue what they're hiring for can demand that kind of thing.

    If you want to program for a living, study computer science or software engineering. You'll have a great shot at employment if you're living in the right markets.

    If you want to manage systems for a living, study computer science if you can hack it and Information Technology if you can't. Install Linux. Find cool things to do with your computers in your spare time and do those things. Go after certifications in what interest you. This is a rewarding path that gives you a varied, interesting tasks (you can do everything from just-short of real engineering to being glorified tech support) but you can't expect anyone to understand what you do. There are jobs in this everywhere, but since no one understands what you do you can expect to be undercompensated and disrespected until you find someone that's already expecting to spend big money on the systems that run their profit centers, in which case you can be overcompensated and have your ego stroked. Expect high competition for bad jobs unless you get a fancy buzzword or few on your resume. Red Hat certification can open some well-paying doors, but just about any other high-end buzzword for your resume will be very market-specific (lots of good telcom certifications here).

    If you want to run networks, pick an Information Technology path that will prepare you for Network+ and/or Cisco certifications. The best of the best are computer science people, but frankly there are a ton of networking "rock stars" that are great at routing configuration and get away with knowing nothing else about technology. This is the easiest path to shots at jobs at a few places that will overpay you and the security of jobs all over the country that have at least marginally good pay.

    If you just want to fix computers, study Information Technology and go for your A+ and Network+ certification. This is the least academic and leans more toward "getting your hands dirty" than the other routes, and so that also means it's the hardest to get a job in with all the competition. But it can be fun and a good stepping stone up to the other levels if you're willing to continually work for it.
     
  4. Calico Jack

    Calico Jack NO QUARTER

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    Thanks for all of the replies.
     
  5. srhoades

    srhoades

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    Try you knack at programming. That is where the demand and hence the money is these days. Regular IT/network guys are a dime a dozen since the economy tanked. Employers have simply bundled multiple IT positions into one and pay the same as one. Competition is pretty fierce unless you either can do support every hardware/software platform and and anything that plugs into the wall, or you can program.