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ISO: Good Martini recipes

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by SVTNate, Jun 6, 2004.

  1. SVTNate

    SVTNate Packers fan

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    I manage a private cigar club, and a couple nights a week I have to work the bar. I have very little experience with mixed drinks, our club members usually stick to scotch/wine/beer/soda. I'd like to get a couple nice martini recipes.

    Here's what we've got on hand, to the best of my memory...

    VODKA

    Belvedere
    Grey Goose
    Due (three varieties)
    Chopin

    GIN

    Bombay Sapphire
    Seagram's
    Bombay (regular)

    We also have Vermouth, and at least a couple kinds of olives. Please let me how you guys make your favorite martinis :)
     

  2. tat2guy

    tat2guy NRA Life Member Silver Member

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    I'm an unlikely martini drinker, as I'm not a big fan of either gin OR olives, but trust me, I take great pride in my Vodka Martinis.

    First off, I gotta say there are VERY few prefixes you can add to the word "martini" and still be talking about an actual martini. Any food name, like "Chocolate" or "Apple" is right out. Also alcohols other than gin or vodka, such as a "congac martini", or a "beertini" do not qualify. What you have then is not a martini, but a cocktail in a martini glass. Acceptable prefixes are- "Dry" (or "extra dry"), "Vodka", a brand name of Gin (ie a Bombay Martini) or Vodka (a Ketel One Martini being my personal preference) or "Dirty", meaning you add olive brine to the martini (that's how my wife likes 'em.) That's about it. Martinis are drinks rich with history and steeped in style- and due to their strength, they take some getting used to. It's not a beginner's drink. It's a mark of sophistication to be able to drink one casually and speak knowingly on them. If you have a martini, you are part of a long tradition- have some respect for that. If you want a cocktail, that's fine, but don't call it a martini. (I don't mean YOU, personally, I mean the entire world of drinkers in general. I'm sure you know all this and obviously want to go about doing it up right- hence posting the question!) OK, done preaching.


    Here's how I mix mine:

    1- Chill your martini glasses. If you don't have room to keep them in the freezer, fill them with ice and water before you start mixing the drink.

    2- Put ice in your cocktail shaker and add about a half ounce of vermouth. Swirl it about, so that it coats the ice, then pour out the vermouth through a cocktail strainer, retaining the ice. The vermouth that sticks to the ice is all you need for a swell martini.

    3- Add CHILLED gin or vodka to shaker (they should always be stored in the freezer). My martini glasses hold 5 oz, so I add 5oz. Most glasses are smaller than that, so check your glasses to see how much you need to add.

    4- Shake well.

    5- Add garnish to glass. (If chilling the glass w/ ice water, now is the time to dump it out.) It is acceptable to put olives in the glass loose, but on a spear of some sort is much classier- especially at a bar, and especially if you're using more than one (I use 3). If using a twist instead, run it around the edge of the glass to release the essential oils. Either discard it or put it in the glass, to your taste.

    6- Give the shaker one last shake, and strain the martini into the glass.

    I've seen a lot of alternative garnishes being used lately, I'll leave it up to you to decide if they're still martinis or not. Some of them would be- Tomolives (tiny pickled green tomatoes- actually really yummy in vodka martinis!), pickled hot peppers, jalepeno slices, bananna pepper slices, and (of course) cocktail onions (giving you a Gibson, not a Martini).

    Also recently I've noticed waitresses and bartenders asking me if I want my martinis up or on the rocks. Up. That's the only acceptable answer. A martini served on rocks is just bad form. I don't know who started that crap, but they need a stern talking to.

    Everyone knows James Bond took his martinis "shaken- not stirred", but not everyone realizes he drank vodka martinis (Stoli, to be technical) with a twist! I felt so much better about my own martini preferences when I realized that!

    Enjoy,
    Donno

    Rereading that, I come off as kinda pompus. Oh well, such is life. I just really like my martinis. Be thankful you didn't ask how to make a proper Mint Julep!
     
  3. f1b32oPTic

    f1b32oPTic R4d104c71v3

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    i didnt think it was pompous

    i drink about 6-7 greygoose extra dirty martinis a week.
    and i am picky about the taste. i do not hesitate to send one back if it is too vermouthy or the olives are washed out

    please post your mint julep method and recipe please
     
  4. SVTNate

    SVTNate Packers fan

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    Thanks for the help. I'll have to work on it... maybe this weekend I'll "practice" until I keel over on the bar ;)

    Unfortunately, our alcohol is room temp. I've got a big stainless industrial fridge, but it's filled with beer/water/soda.

    Now what's proper form for a dirty martini?
     
  5. f1b32oPTic

    f1b32oPTic R4d104c71v3

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    instead of coating the ice with vermouth, i like to have the inside of my chilled glass rinsed with vermouth.

    when adding the vodka to the shaker, add 3/4 oz. olive juice per 2oz. of grey goose or stoli and shake till slushy

    thats a dirty, i like mine with about an ounce and a half of olive juice and about three olives skewered, thats my extra dirty.

    its like a meal you can drink
     
  6. CZ-75A

    CZ-75A

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    Please do.
     
  7. sgtglock

    sgtglock

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    I will add my .02 to my favorite cocktail. I like my martini's really dirty as well. If you really want to try something good, do this. Take a large olive (unstuffed or pull out the pimento) and stuff the olive with a quality blue cheese. It is an amazing combination and a nice treat after finishing the martini.


    also, grey goose vodka rules.


    You all take care.
     
  8. tat2guy

    tat2guy NRA Life Member Silver Member

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    Heh heh, cool. OK, Mint Julep recipies.

    First I must say that all the stuff about tradition I mentioned regarding martinis is probably multiplied by 10 when it comes to this drink. Unfortunately, not being a Southerner, tradition dictates that I not be the one making the Mint Juleps- it's a responsibility reserved for a Souhern Gentelman. So since it's my birthright to make 'em wrong, I have 2 methods, which even my Southern friends have admitted are, "mighty fine..... for a Yankee".

    The long (and more appropriate) way:

    First you need a 1 litre bottle of good Burbon. I prefer Maker's Mark myself, but any top shelf Burbon will do (I also like Knob Creek and Bookers, amongst others. Although usually located in the Burbon section of the liquor store, Jack Daniels is not Burbon. It's great in it's own right and for it's own purposes, but it is what it is, and it ain't what it ain't...) You also need FRESH mint leaves. For the preperation stage, maybe 30 or so smallish ones (about the size of a nickle or so...) and then for the serving stage (about a month after the preperation stage) a couple more per drink. You'll also need 1 cup of water and one cup of sugar (my preference is for Turbinado, or unrefined, sugar- available as "Sugar in the Raw" at most supermarkets).

    Clean the mint leaves and put them in a glass bowl (metal or plastic may impart off flavors) and cover them with burbon- about 4 or 5 oz. Allow them to soak for around 15 minutes. Gather the soaked leaves together in a clean white cloth (that was washed without detergent, to avoid any soapiness in the drink) and wring them tightly over the bowl, squeezing out all the liquid. This will bruise the leaves pretty well, and the liquid coming off may have a slightly green tint. This is fine. Put the leaves back in the bowl with the liquid and repeat 3 or 4 more times.

    While all that soaking is going on, make a batch of simple syrup with the sugar in water. Simply boil the water, reduce the heat, add the sugar, and stir untill it's completely dissolved. Be sure not to burn or carmelize the sugar! Set it aside to cool.

    Now you want to put 3 and 1/2 cups of burbon in a large glass bowl or pitcher, and put the rest in a decanter (or a large glass of ice) for later (or immediate) consumption.

    Add a cup of simple syrup to the whiskey. Mix well.

    Next you're going to start adding the mint extract to the burbon/syrup mixture. Add it slowly, a tablespoon at a time. Stir thoroughly and taste after each addition. Cleanse your pallette with water between tastings. It should have a nice subtle mint taste, not be overwhelmingly minty. It takes practice to get it right, but it's the kind of practice that's REALLY enjoyable!

    When you get it to the right flavor, pour it all back into the bottle (or a decanter if you'd prefer) and refrigerate it- ideally for a month, but as little as a week will do- and let the flavors fully blend.

    When it comes time to serve, fill your Julep cups (we all have a set of Sterling Silver Julep cup, right ? <just kidding- I sure as hell don't!> A nice glass high balls work OK) half way with ice. Take 2 or 3 fresh (clean) mint leaves and rub them around the inside of the mouth of the glass, gently bruising them, and then drop them in the glass, too. Fill with the mint julep you spent all that time preparing. If desired, sprinkle a little powdered sugar on top of the floating ice, and serve with a straw that is clipped down to one inch above the rim of the glass (which forces the drinker to have their nose very close to the drink, allowing proper appreciation of the bouquet.)

    Sit back and enjoy thoroughly.

    Now obviously not everyone has that kinda time on their hands. And even if you do, when you make a batch you're gonna want a drink long before the batch is ready, so I've devised method 2, the quick and dirty version.

    The simple version (don't serve this at the kentucky Derby):

    Make a batch of simple syrup, and add to it a few mint leaves. Keep this in the refrigerator for when you want a Mint Julep but don't have a bottle prepared the long way.

    Fill your favorite Mint Julep glass hafway with ice. Rub fresh mint leaves around the inside of the mouth of the cup, and put the bruised leaves in with the ice.

    Add some burbon to the glass, then some of your minty syrup to taste (roughly 3 to 1 or stronger) and stir it thoroughly.

    It's still delicious, even if it ignores the tradition and ceremony associated with a "real" Mint Julep.
     
  9. CZ-75A

    CZ-75A

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    Would cheesecloth be good for the extraction of the mint leaves?
     
  10. Ned Ludd

    Ned Ludd

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    To what has already been said let me add the following:

    Chilling glasses and keeping the booze cold does nothing for the taste of a martini. They only make the drink stronger. This, in my opinion, is both unnecessary and inauthentic. A proper martini should be cold from melted ice, not refrigeration. What is important is that the ice be very pure.

    Ian Fleming was a Philistine. A proper martini is made with gin.

    While many disagree, I do not think a martini should taste like cold gin. The drink gets its name from vermouth and should have a distinct taste of vermouth.

    My formula -- eighth of a shot glass of vermouth to one shot glass of very good gin. Pour over ice. Shake (or stir). Strain and serve.

    -NL
     
  11. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    Amen Brother Ludd!! ;) And shaking is for San Francisco, not for proper Martinis.

    There’s always W.C. Field’s recipe for the perfect Martini: Fill a glass with gin. Cast the shadow of a bottle of vermouth once, lightly, across the top of the glass. ;e

    My favorite is something akin to the Montgomery-tini. Fieldmarshall Montgomery supposedly preferred a manpower advantage of 15-to-1 before going on the offensive. According to legend he also preferred his Martinis in the same ratio.

    In my version, I nearly fill the shaker with ice. Pour in 1/4 jigger of vermouth and swirl. Pour off the vermouth and give it a couple of good shakes. Add a healthy jigger of Tanqueray, pouring gently down the side of the shaker. Stir gently until condensation is well formed on the outside of the shaker (no more than 30 seconds). Pour immediately into a well-chilled glass with 2-3 large Spanish olives. Repeat.
     
  12. OSSI

    OSSI Litter Kitty CLM

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    Best very, very, very, very, dry Martini

    Best Gin you can get
    "Noilly Prat" Vermouth.
    Just let the Gin "inhale" the smell of the vermouth. Olive, and most importent. - Make it a double:)
     
  13. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    I like it, I like it! :)

    Q. How can you tell if a bartender makes a proper dry Martini?
    A. The men's room has dust bins, not urinals.
     
  14. OSSI

    OSSI Litter Kitty CLM

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    ;z ;z ;z ;z
    My friend you you obviously know the "real" thing:cool:
     
  15. tat2guy

    tat2guy NRA Life Member Silver Member

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    cheesecloth is perfect.