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Covering two of my favorite topics: emergency preparedness and cop shops. That being said, it's a serious vein of sorts that I hope to push around to some other boards for some insights and maybe an article later. At least working on something for my agency and maybe some others.

Several weeks ago, I was sitting with some friends and we were discussing disasters and responses over the years from departments and agencies. The stories varied and some had practical experience. I told them about the debrief I received from a NOLA SWAT officer shortly after Katrina. While NOLA had supplies and food in place, most was store at locations below the water line and when the water flooded in, most the the supplies were either destroyed or flooded out. That got me thinking about my agency and others as well.

Most of us have been forced to go through NIMS of some sort. Yet very few have gone through what to do for a major disaster (although some have practical experience ala hurricanes or earthquakes). A lateral of our from Florida told me that his SO had a policy of mandatory supplies store for at least a week of survival because of hurricane frequency. I've heard other agencies do the same. I would venture that some of us have BOBs/BHBs/RIPs in our vehicles or some supplies stored in our lockers (no one is getting my roll of TP! No one!).

What I am trying to find out is how prepared your agency is at sustained operations during a major disaster? Food, water, fuels prepositioned? Or come as you are?

My agency is poorly prepared. We have cots. And line of site to FEMA Region 10 headquarters.

That's it. I was told food would be obtained from the local Albertsons if we needed it. Hell, we don't even have keys to the mayor's office in city hall. How do they expect us to get into the grocery store when things get bad? Water: we have water tanks on the hill. Never mind we don't have access to them or even a way to hook a hose to it. The backup generator is a diesel fueled monster that runs for about 12 hours on a tank. During our last major windstorm for the region, we were out for more than 24 hours, in a major surburban area. Fuel pumps for the vehicles: electrical powered with generator backup, I hear (can't confirm). Can't cook at the city hall/PD building because the stove is electric? We'll use the BBQ grill that has no backup tank. By the way, who has matches? The igniter isn't sparking. People need to extend beyond their normal shift and have to remain in place for extended periods? We'll figure it out. We have cots. But no blankets.

As I talk to peers and friends in the industry, this is not unusual. So, it your agency not at all, somewhat or well prepared for a major disaster? I'm writing about physical assets beyond a bank of screens at the local EOC.
 

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No. We had idiots that were more concerned about patrol people having the US State Department Consular advisory notices for arrests of foreign nationals than if we had ammo for training, flares for accidents, or stored water in the desert.
 

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Definitely not. Had a tornado come through town two years ago, no fatalities, but widespread power outages and homes destroyed on the east side of town.

About the only thing they did right was cut off the city gas pumps and have officers fill up every available car and truck at service stations keeping the city tanks as reserve.

Two weeks after that we all got issued Motorola lincs and new directives came out making patrol "on call".

Poor leadership and knee jerk reactions, as always, are our downfalls in critical incidents. Sometimes you just have to tackle one thing at a time in the order things come in until you get caught up, and our admin cannot do that.
 

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Our county emergency management agency has a ridiculous cache of crap. It, unfortunately, is across the river that was the source of our last significant flood. That one never reached the point where anything was completley inaccessible by car (there was one bridge (out of six, including one over Interstate 80) that remained open. I suppose that EMA's stock makes us more prepared than most.
 

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My EMS agency is very equipped preparing for something. We got a lot more stuff donated since the West explosion. My PD and FD not so much.

Sent from the Tardis using psychic paper.
 

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I would say as an agency no. We have a USAR team local, but it's the fire department. Also, do have EM stuff (also run by the FD), but the PD does not have anything to my knowledge. They may have some stuff stuck in a warehouse, but it has never been told to us peons.

Since I love emergency management and would do that as a second career, I'm very interested in it as well. But to get people to talk to you about it is impossible.
 

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Don't get me started on the A-clowns that run the nearby town

The only landing strip/airport in the County is at sea level 150 yds from the average tide line . But that is OK all of the equipment that would be needed to clear the runway in case of a tsunami or earthquake is conveniently located in the new Public Works facility at the end of the runway, along with the emergency supply of fuel.




Tell me, what is wrong with this picture? (Considering the city owns unused property in the hills 90-120 feet above sea level and a mile and a half from the ocean and the Port that owns the airport owns a cleared former mill site 7 miles up river bigger than the airstrip.)
 

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Geez. I didn't know we had it together compared to some. I suppose the 89 earthquake left a mark. We have food and water at the PD. Not a lot and mostly snacks but it would do for a couple of days at least. If I am off duty and coming in I will bring my small camp stove and some canned food to hell me out last that. We end up using Safeway and Costco for other more short term emergencies. We could rely on our Costco for quite some time. Plus the NG was flying officers over for anti looting patrols. They could throw some food on the bird if they had to.

posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
 

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Nope.

I was just tasked with updating the COOP (Continuity of Operations Plan) and OEP (Occupant Emergency Plan) and it was last upated in 2004 / 2005.

When the SHTF it's going to be bad.
 

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We are in hurricane country, and we are very prepared. There are plans and the resources are in place as well. The agency prior to here had no plans and when the fires in the Bastrop and Spicewood had everyone in a major tizzy. They were concerned about fires pooping up in the city.

I am interested to see this storm season.
 

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Morris, sad though it may be... you are miles ahead of lots of us.
My place's plans are ... ummmm, ummmmm, yeah, still wondering myself.
 

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Prepared? Hahahahaha. More like knee jerk reactions after something happens
 

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Hell to the no. As a secondary responder agency, we don't have radio interoperability except with DPS since we share the same radio system. We're also the bastard stepchildren and are excluded from most mass casualty/critical incident/tabletop exercises.

The biggest problem I see that they still haven't learned since 9/11 is radio interoperability. Metro was on an Open Sky system (compatible with NOTHING) but dumped it. They didn't learn their lesson and are now going to a 700MHz APCO P25 system. The only other P25 systems in this area are Bureau of Interior (Hoover Dam), FBI, TSA and Nellis AFB. Henderson, North Las Vegas and the City of Las Vegas are on SNACC (800MHz trunked Motorola Type II) and the state agencies are on NSRS (EDACS 800MHz trunked). While Metro might be the 900lb gorilla in the state, they're still going to have to communicate with other responders if the SHTF.
 

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Nope, we are a rural Troop in New England and we have one four wheel drive vehicle. My assigned Expedition. And thats only because I am assigned portable truck scales and they dont fit in a cruiser. This last big snowstorm we had not one four wheel drive vehicle on the road. Guys were stuck for hours.
 
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