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Is Glock a good self defense platform for 'average' shooters

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by grayi6, Mar 16, 2017.

  1. grayi6

    grayi6

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    While considering the purchase of a 26, I have read so many countless posts that reference the need to have a good and firm grip technique in order to avoid various ejection issues. If a person is of 'average' ability, are they better off sticking with other platforms? I don't mean this sarcastically, it is a genuine question.
     
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  2. Bruce M

    Bruce M

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    There are almost certainly pistols that are a bit more forgiving of a poor grip than is a Glock, statistically speaking. A fair number of those are more expensive than a Glock and few have as much aftermarket support.
     

  3. Teasip

    Teasip

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    I think that most would agree that it's more about the grip and resistance applied at the time of firing to allow for cycling of the firearm than it is the gun itself. With revolvers you can still "limp wrist" but cycling won't be an issue.
     
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  4. DNA

    DNA

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    Fix the grip issue and you'll be able to shoot everything you come across. Now if the issue is purely physical and you cannot grip it right (injuries, age etc), then yes, look at other platforms and practice clearing malfunction drills.

    Dan
     
  5. jnichols2

    jnichols2

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    With just about any brand of semi-auto pistol the common advice is to have a firm grip.
    You even need a firm grip on any revolver of power. Watch some YouTubes of folks letting the gun hit them in the head from recoil. I would really hesitate to name a "other platform" that doesn't like a firm grip. Even my .22 target pistol likes a firm grip.

    But don't despair, a firm grip is a good thing, and will make you a better shooter. It just means to hold it firmly, like an ordinary handshake. It doesn't mean bone crushing tight.

    What "platform" are you shooting now?
     
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  6. Keith Pierson

    Keith Pierson Exploring Alternate Routes

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    I think a Glock is purpose made for the casual shooter. One with a little since, anyway.
    No safety to learn (I personally like a thumb safety), simple to maintain and operate, and NO it will not fire without the trigger being pulled.
    Folks hate on everything, and as already stated there are pistols that, in theory, are more forgiving than a Glock for a loose, physically compromised, or wimpy grip.
    All pistols should be shot and held like you are mad at them and they are trying to run away.
    Find what works best for you, shoot before you buy if possible and get some good training. Your local PD, SO, or even gun store may have training classes. Steer clear of the "Yeager's" out there. They my be knowledgeable but are more show dogs than instructors.

    YMMV
     
  7. sciolist

    sciolist

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  8. Randylahey53

    Randylahey53

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    Imo you shouldn't have a gun or at least shouldn't be considering using your gun for self defense unless you can get a grip down and some practice.

    You'd be surprised how crazy your mind goes when under stress.
     
  9. newseditor

    newseditor fire/rescue104

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    I've always gripped the crap out of my pistols, and it's made me a much better shot. I grip the crap out of my golf clubs too, and it's made me a crappy golfer!
    To each discipline, its own path to perfection.
    And, to the question, yes the Glock probably is a good self-defense platform for average shooters, as are others. My best shooters are Walthers, but I use a Glock 43 for EDC because it is accurate and very easy to use and extremely easy to conceal carry. I don't need it to hit target centers 35 yards away, but if I need it in an up-close self-defense incident, I have complete confidence it will get the job done. I consider how I grip a pistol to be the biggest factor in how its shoots.
     
  10. Rocky7

    Rocky7

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  11. AzItLies

    AzItLies

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    I find your question a bit confusing...
    You indicate reading (many times) a glock (26) having 'ejection' issues, due to lack of firm grip... but then go on to ask should you consider 'other platforms'?

    is that a diff glock? a diff semi-auto by a diff mfg? a revolver?

    I've owned numerous semi-autos over the last 30 yrs or so. They *all* need a firm grip really, it's just inherent in the basic design they all have. A pistol on the other hand does not need quite the same firmness (at least not to function properly).

    Good luck with it. Not knowing why you have an issue with it, I'd add anyway, developing a firm grip isn't usually a big deal for most.
     
  12. janice6

    janice6 Silver Member

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    Some people have problems.

    I tried with my G27 to get a malfunction by holding it with 3 fingers. Worked repeatedly. I couldn't figure out how to hold it and fire it with just two fingers without dropping it. I couldn't make it fail. Others have problems making it work. People are different.

    Some people naturally provide the resistance necessary to counteract the recoil of the slide, ensuring a complete cycle. Others seem to be so loose that they let their body soak up the momentum of the slide and it fails to return to battery. They need an alternative or training.
     
  13. nikolaz

    nikolaz

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    Have a solid grip. In a self defense situation you are going to be white knuckling it.
     
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  14. Giggity-Giggity

    Giggity-Giggity Giggity-Goo!!!

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  15. Delleetodd

    Delleetodd

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    I have a gen4 26 and it functions perfectly for me and my wife that does not grip it properly. I run a 20Lb recoil spring assembly from Wolff (no other mods) and I still have no feed or ejection problems with anything from 115 grain target rounds to +p+ rounds. Carry it every day. Just shot 50 rounds of perfecta and 20 rounds of underwood +P+ Nosler on Sunday. Did not clean it after and it is shoved down my pants right now. Fully trust it and carry 124 HST +p.
     
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  16. Hank Was Right

    Hank Was Right

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    My position on this has evolved over the years. It's easy for people, myself included, to make excuses for a product we like. It has been my experience that most Glocks are more sensitive to improper grip than aluminum and steel frame guns. I used to simply write this off as a training issue, placing the burden on the shooter to fix it. A few years ago I was diagnosed with a certain form of arthritis. Around that same time my previously perfect Glock began having malfunctions when I would go through my weak hand drills. I had to work at maintaining a better grip to eliminate these malfunctions, and switched to a certain ammunition that seemed to be more resistant to operator-induced problems. This all made me rethink my philosophy on the guns I carried.

    I started weighing the pros and cons of the designs with which I was most familiar. With the Glock, you get a wonderfully simple design, low cost, compact size, and light weight. It's an extremely reliable gun (when using proper technique), and very durable, with little in the way of parts breakage or required routine maintenance. But if you're in a tight spot, injured, trying to fire from an awkward position with wet or bloody hands, a malfunction, while still unlikely, is a distinct possibility. My DA/SA metal-framed guns simply do not malfunction, regardless of grip. But they do require more maintenance, some of which is to avoid what could be catastrophic parts breakage (think locking block on a Beretta) that can't be cleared like a "limp-wristed" Glock. Mine are maintained at a meticulous level, and I trust them to work in a wider range of conditions than my Glocks.

    There's no such thing as a free lunch, whether you're a veteran or a newbie. If you shoot a polymer framed gun, perfect your grip and learn your malfunction drills. If you shoot a Beretta or Sig P226, keep it oiled and keep the springs fresh, and learn your malfunction drills. If you carry a revolver, make all six count and practice with the speedloaders. If you carry a 1911... well, you're just cool.
     
  17. halfmoonclip

    halfmoonclip

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    In our training classes, 'limp wrist' misfeeds or ejection have not been an issue; we let our rookies try a number of our privately owned Glocks, including a 42; the only LW jam we encountered was one gal who held my 42 halfway down the grip.
    For the OP, if you hold your pistol firmly (no death grip required), you should be fine. The pistols simplicity and reliability make it a good choice for 'average' shooters. Just keep that booger hook off the bang switch.
    Moon
     
  18. AzItLies

    AzItLies

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    And that is exactly why I sold my beautiful stainless Beretta. At the range one day, was telling the guy working there I'd heard about locking block issues with them. He reached under the counter and pulled out a tub of what had to be about 15 blocks (all broken or sheared almost in half), all from Berettas.
     
  19. grayi6

    grayi6

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    Thanks for the input. I am not trying to criticize Glock, just trying to understand. I agree 100 pct on the firm grip advice, I'm not debating that at all. I'm just thinking that I would like to pick up a 26 since it is smaller and lighter than my XD9sc. I have never had any issues with the XD (or my my S&W), even while intentionally limp wristing. But when I have rented a 26, I have had issues both times. When I read about it on GT, it seems the answer is always grip, grip, grip. But I don't have grip issues on other platforms. With all that said, I would like a 26 but not if it is going to be a struggle for me to shoot.
     
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  20. Borg Warner

    Borg Warner

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    You're asking exactly the right kind of questions. It's not a good idea for anyone to buy a new gun and just assume that they'll be able to use it defensively in a completely effective manner.

    It requires practice and if you run into difficultly some formal training may be required. But basically, If you grip the gun firmly, you shouldn't have any problems and if you do, you'll soon learn how to correct it since you've already zeroed in on the most common problem.

    As Americans, we've been conditioned by Advertising to believe that every product we buy will make everything easy with "no muss, and no fuss" and will require little effort on our part, and if it doesn't, well, that's what class action lawsuits are for, because after all, the advertising inferred that the product would do everything for us just like magic with little or no effort or familiarization with the product on our part.