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I bought a new G17 a few days ago and took it to the range today. It jammed on 20% of the rounds! In each failure, the expended round ejected cleanly but the new round didn't feed into the chamber, causing the slide to jam open. I only took one of the 3 provided Glock mags with me.

The ammo I used were my own reloads. I've been using the same reload formula for the last 12,000 rounds: 4.6 gr Bullseye and 115 gr Winchester FMJ roundnose bullets. During that time I've not had a single jam or misfire in either my Browning Hi Power, Sig P320C, Taurus PT99 or Ruger EC9s. I realize 4.6 is a relatively light charge for 9mm, but it's worked flawlessly and accurately in my 4 other pistols. And I don't think the jams are being caused by my grip.

I'll clean and lube the pistol, then try a different factory mag and some Winchester white box factory loads next time. I'm just wondering if G17s are known to be picky about the ammo they're fed?
 

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Given your reloads' history of reliability in your other pistols, the answer is pretty obvious.

But just for scats and giggles, can you reload a batch of ammo to something equivalent to a 9mm NATO, just to re-confirm it's the Glock?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Given your reloads' history of reliability in your other pistols, the answer is pretty obvious.

But just for scats and giggles, can you reload a batch of ammo to something equivalent to a 9mm NATO, just to re-confirm it's the Glock?
Yeah, I usually do my reloading around Christmas. If the cleaning, oiling and different magazine don't correct the problem I'll load a dozen or so with a hotter charge. It will be interesting to see if the Winchester White Box rounds work in the G17, too.
 

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I have three Gen 5 G 17. Two of them have eaten all kinds of ammo Tula, Wolf, Blazer aluminum, Blaze Brass. I have not tried reloads yet. I will test the new one Friday and see how it fares. I do remember years ago I had a lot of reloads that would run just fine in my Sig 225; but would jam about every three rounds in a Glock 17. I think you will have to make some changes to your reloads, The bullet may be too far out of the casing. Try dropping the reload in your barrel or use a gauge. Best of luck to you,
 

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Yeah, I usually do my reloading around Christmas. If the cleaning, oiling and different magazine don't correct the problem I'll load a dozen or so with a hotter charge. It will be interesting to see if the Winchester White Box rounds work in the G17, too.
before you go loading up fireballs. take a mag of your reloads, insert, and rack the slide manually. back, then release. don't ride the slide forward. see if you can replicate your problem. these gen 5s have a shorter throat. I had to shorten my 9MM reloads to function in my duty gun (17). that ran fine prior in my 43x. I did not have this issue with my gen 5 .40 but the 9mm seem to be notorious for it.
 

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What does "dropping the reload in your barrel" mean? Are you saying shorten the overall cartridge length of my rounds, or physically inserting a round into the chamber?
physically dropping a round in the barrel. i.e. your reloads may be too tall.
 

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I bought a new G17 a few days ago and took it to the range today. It jammed on 20% of the rounds! In each failure, the expended round ejected cleanly but the new round didn't feed into the chamber, causing the slide to jam open. I only took one of the 3 provided Glock mags with me.

The ammo I used were my own reloads. I've been using the same reload formula for the last 12,000 rounds: 4.6 gr Bullseye and 115 gr Winchester FMJ round-nose bullets. During that time I've not had a single jam or misfire in either my Browning Hi Power, Sig P320C, Taurus PT99 or Ruger EC9s. I realize 4.6 is a relatively light charge for 9mm, but it's worked flawlessly and accurately in my 4 other pistols. And I don't think the jams are being caused by my grip.

I'll clean and lube the pistol, then try a different factory mag and some Winchester white box factory loads next time. I'm just wondering if G17s are known to be picky about the ammo they're fed?
While I do not want to fly in the face of conventional wisdom, I am going to go exactly contrary to most, but not all, of the advice you've been given so far. First off, on a subjective note, I have never (as in never) owned a brand new Glock pistol that ran either correctly or well right out of the box. All three of my factory-new Glock pistols required something in order to get them up and running properly.

Now I am sure all of the Glockeroos are going to be 'up in arms' over the above remark, and I hope that I am not going to get a chorus of 'my new Glock is (or was) perfect' replies. If Glock's polymer frame pistols have been anything over the past 18 years that I have been building and working on them, they have been HIGHLY INCONSISTENT. One Glock will work, and another will not. It is just that simple!

(Consequently, someone chiming in with a statement like, "My Glock is (or was) perfect!" is, in reality, offering an irrelevant and meaningless non sequitur.)

I've also had to learn the hard way that brand new polymer frame pistols require, at least, a 300 round break-in before one of them can be trusted to run smoothly and efficiently. Personally, I have put between 500 and 1,000 fired rounds through every new Glock I own BEFORE I began carrying it for self-defense. (Back when I first got into Glocks the Illinois State Police used to require 750 rounds to be fired through a brand new Glock before being certified for field service.)

According to Dave Borges (CEO of Polymer80 Corp.) brand new polymer frame pistols need to be repeatedly flexed (by firing) before they can be trusted for consistently reliable use. Here is an except from an article in the April, 2016 issue of the NRA’s premier magazine, ‘Shooting Illustrated’. On page #10 there’s a piece titled, ‘Plastic Fantastic’. This revelation helps to explain, ‘Why’ so many new Glock owners have experienced, and continue to regularly experience, difficult-to-understand: stoppages, jams, and other problems with their brand new Glock pistols. The first pertinent quote is,

"In terms of a pistol frame, the tip of the barrel is where specific heat is applied, although the barrel is not touching the frame. This heat is predictable and therefore the injection mold is designed to manufacture the frame with THE ULTIMATE RELAXATION (emphasis added)(Ed.) of the material in mind .... . It does not impact performance or accuracy."

Now, to continue from the general text of the article, the second pertinent quote is, (Ready?)

"IT TAKES 500 TO 1,000 ROUNDS FOR THE POLYMERS TO RELAX."

~ Dave Borges, CEO, Polymer80 Corporation

This plastic-molding phenomenon is equally as true of Glock’s polymer frames as it is of Polymer80's aftermarket pistol frames, and AR15 receivers. It, also, helps to explain, ‘Why’ brand new polymer magazine baseplates are so very difficult to remove the first time the magazine is disassembled. Newly molded, stiff, and un:flexed polymer needs to have an opportunity to relax, and THAT only comes from actually using the pistol.

Right now the very first thing you need to do is to break that Glock's new polymer frame in; and, then, if you're still having a problem, return here and ask for additional help.
 

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Cycle the slide a few hundred times manually and go from there also you have to realize it's a brand new pistol built for a life of 9mm nato (basically +p) winchester white box probably won't run that great either btw unless it is the nato flavor. I personally like sellier and bellot or blazer brass for target ammo.
 

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Have not experienced any issues ,Although some Glock shooters at range do not like Blazer aluminum cased ammo extractor shears off softer aluminum and bits and pieces fly about .Also steel cased can be tough on extractors ,Both of which I never shoot at all .
 

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I bought a new G17 a few days ago and took it to the range today. It jammed on 20% of the rounds! In each failure, the expended round ejected cleanly but the new round didn't feed into the chamber, causing the slide to jam open. I only took one of the 3 provided Glock mags with me.

The ammo I used were my own reloads. I've been using the same reload formula for the last 12,000 rounds: 4.6 gr Bullseye and 115 gr Winchester FMJ roundnose bullets. During that time I've not had a single jam or misfire in either my Browning Hi Power, Sig P320C, Taurus PT99 or Ruger EC9s. I realize 4.6 is a relatively light charge for 9mm, but it's worked flawlessly and accurately in my 4 other pistols. And I don't think the jams are being caused by my grip.

I'll clean and lube the pistol, then try a different factory mag and some Winchester white box factory loads next time. I'm just wondering if G17s are known to be picky about the ammo they're fed?
Learn to grip it properly, so the frame isn't moving with the slide in recoil. A new gun with a stiff recoil spring and a light frame is going to short cycle and catch the next round against the ramp before it is in position to feed, if you don't have something at least close to a proper grip.

This space left blank for you to write about how you know how to shoot and have been a gun owner for ____ years, etc:





Alternatively, if you do have some clue about grip, then your loads are too light for the new recoil spring. You can change the load or change the recoil spring (or grip it better).

Since you are using half a grain more Bullseye in your 9mm than I use for a .45 shooting at a 50 yard target, I still lean toward grip.
 
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