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Info on parachute riggers or logistics

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I am a usmc vet, combat engineer. My son just recently enter the delayed entry program but has yet to pick an mos, unfortunately he failed the color blind test at meps, so his selection is limited. Looking for info on parachute rigging 0451 or any of the other logistic mos’s to help him narrow down his selection.
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I am a usmc vet, combat engineer. My son just recently enter the delayed entry program but has yet to pick an mos, unfortunately he failed the color blind test at meps, so his selection is limited. Looking for info on parachute rigging 0451 or any of the other logistic mos’s to help him narrow down his selection.
Semper Fi, Brother. I don’t have a lot of info for you, but I would tell him to consider an MOS that has a good civilian equivalent. I don’t know what logistics MOSs are available, but think shipping and receiving.
 

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Well I would ask so the Marine Corps did not work out as a career, what job in the civilian world needs a Parachute Rigger.

Logistic is not a bad choice, as there is work in the civilian world for people with logistic skill.
 

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I didn't serve in the Marines, but your son cannot go wrong with a MOS in logistics like Jarine88 and Glock-O-Rican stated above since the field has jobs that are directly applicable to the civilian sector. American Military University has three bachelor's degree programs (see links below) focused on logistics, so encourage him to consider taking college courses while he's serving to get a jump start on a degree.

B.A. in Supply Chain Management
B.A. in Reverse Logistics Management
B.A. in Transportation and Logistics Management
 

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... Looking for info on parachute rigging 0451 or any of the other logistic mos’s to help him narrow down his selection.
In the 1970s Marines went to NAS Lakehurst, NJ for the "A" School for Parachute Rigging. To graduate you had to pack your own chute and make a Jump. As I recall you should be skilled enough to pack three chutes per hour. Their are 13 steps to pack a chute. In my day it was the T-10 and now the military uses the T-11 as of 2006. Besides parachutes they also set up survival gear for aircrews and equipment drops.

One prior Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps started out as a Parachute Rigger. So your son has many options in that career field. :drillsgt:
 

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Most of the Smokejumpers I met in Alaska were former military. I believe they also have riggers to maintain their gear.
 

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OK, from someone who had boots on the ground, the airplane deck and ship's desk.
MOS 0451 is Air Delivery. (a lot of parachute packing there
MOS 0441is Logistics (read "general" unit logistics)
MOS 0431 is Embarkation. Lower ranks this is ship loading and full accountability of all unit inventory.
At E-7 (Gunnery Sergeant) the o431 and 0441s merge into one MOS 0491.
Caution: I was USNR and was working to become a draftsman but settled on being a Radar Operator to get some traction (rank). For ease of training I changed to ET (Electronics Technician) only to sideline myself back to drafting. I also had studied the USN extensively.
After joining the Marines (reserves can make the switch). as a Squadron 0431, I did ALL the logistics functions of the unit from ordering operation and maintenance supplies to accounting for everything the squadron after serving for about 2 years as an Aviation Electrician.

An 0431 does not have a minute to themselves - if they do, they are not doing their job. Training is weak at best and hard. A loggy or embarker can not rest on their laurels.

Just prior to my end of my contract, I went looking for a job to make the exit. One company did not need electricians but the supply type experience they needed yesterday.

Log jobs are out there now, but everyone thinks you are about the High School drop-out class and the jobs suck as does the pay. That aside, I used to scare the heck out of my supervisors with what I could do. Every experience I had had served me well later on. I was able to identify parts that others could only guess at. In one case, I had a supervisor ask if I had ordered a specific item. I told him that did not seem to be a priority with the requesting site - so no I had not ordered it. He was UPSET! After lunch I was back in his office to have my tail-feathers trimmed. He asked again if I had "failed" to get that part. I said "No!" He said, well this morning that is not what you told me. I stated again that it had not been a priority and that at that point I had not gotten it. He asked what had changed. I stated he appeared to have made it a priority. For that reason, I had gotten it and it was shipped and would arrive in 3 working days to the site. He was floored. Didn't know if he should continue with and chewing me out or compliment me for such fast action. I gave him a copy of the shipping documents. Again, he was floored!

So, yes, the Marine 0431 or 0441 teaches a lot. However, to be better than one's peers, everything one runs across, pay attention, learn and at least mentally file it away. One needs an analytical and a creative mind

When things go wrong, everyone wants to blame the loggy. For what they paid, I was canned because I did not put up with management's stupidity. Company Policy and Procedures stated that a Buyer (I wasn't a buyer) had 30 days to procure an item. It took me on average about 5 days from receipt of request to getting it to the buyer - and I was too slow. I showed them the Company P&P which showed the Buyer had 30 days to act. I then showed them my interaction with the buyers, who, using my research, got the item on order within 3 to 4 days. I even got the required 7 signatures to move the request from my desk to the buyer's desk in that average of 5 days (longest was 7 days). My experience as a (Military) U.S. Customs Agent also helped after my days in uniform. I was in England, procured an item for a u.S. Government contract in Maryland, USA. That site manager was stunned when he got that item within 72 hours of his request! Item was in the mail less than 24 hours and went through British and U.S. Customs to boot.

Sorry, I did not mean for this to be an extensive rant.
 

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A friend was an aircraft mechanic and parachute rigger in the Marine Corps.

When he was in the Marine Corps he wanted to get a part time civilian job packing parachutes, as the pay is good and the hours are short.

The FAA told him at that time, that they didn't license active duty military members.
 

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I am a usmc vet, combat engineer. My son just recently enter the delayed entry program but has yet to pick an mos, unfortunately he failed the color blind test at meps, so his selection is limited. Looking for info on parachute rigging 0451 or any of the other logistic mos’s to help him narrow down his selection.
Are you sure he can be a rigger? In the Army you can't be a parachute rigger if you are colorblind - can't be any kind of paratrooper (which all riggers are).
 

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Well I would ask so the Marine Corps did not work out as a career, what job in the civilian world needs a Parachute Rigger.
Plenty of jobs in the civilian world need people who used to be Marines and the military will usually pay for college when you get out, so being a civilian rigger is the least of it.

As for jobs for parachute riggers - assuming they also go to jump school and become parachutists, like the ones in the Army, being a smokejumper (parachuting wildfire fighters) was something guys used to talk about when I was a paratrooper.
 
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