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Info on HK (Heckler and Koch) P7 (pee seven)

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by rappa29, Mar 5, 2010.

  1. rappa29

    rappa29 JAFO

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    Hi,

    Looking to add one of these 'classics' to my mini collection of single stack 9mm.

    Can anyone give me the rundown on the HK P7 series of pistols or direct me to a definitive resource? Details such as..

    General price I should expect to pay for one.
    Significant markings I should look for.
    Differences between the various models.
    Etc.

    I'm starting to do some legwork on finding and buying one but want to know what to look for and what a fair price is. I've seen prices from $750-$1000 depending on model, condition, finish, etc.

    It would be for all purpose use (CCW, home, car, range, etc).

    Not looking for a mint safe queen but also don't want a completely dogged out police trade in.

    TIA!
     
  2. H&K 4 LIFE

    H&K 4 LIFE Leonum A Ignis

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    HK P7 series pistols...

    P7 (PSP "type")- "European" heel mag release, no heat shield, flush fitting bushing requires a takedown tool to remove the FP assembly. Takes P7 magazines (different then M8)-9mm capacity 8rnds.

    P7 European police trade-in's are graded A through C. As grade increases (A being best), visible wear decreases and price increases. P7's can be had from $500-$900 depending on grade, cleaning tools, box, paperwork, etc.

    P7M8- "American" style mag. release (located near trigger guard), heat shield, raised bushing for no tools removal of the FP assembly. Takes M8 magazines-9mm capacity 8rnds.

    P7M8's go for around $1,000-$1,500 depending on condition (NIB vs. used), box, cleaning tools, paperwork, etc.

    P7M13- Mag. release located near trigger guard. Heat sheild. 9mm, capacity 13rnds. double stack.

    P7M13 SD- Same as above, only with factory extended and threaded barrel for the addition of a suppressor.

    P7M10- Mag. release located near trigger guard. Heat sheild. .40S&W capacity 10rnds. double stack.

    P7K3- Convertible to 3 calibers, .22LR, .32ACP, and .380ACP. Mag. release located near trigger guard. No heat sheild. Uses an inertia blow-back action, unlike the gas-retarded action of the other P7 series pistols.

    P7M7- .45 ACP, capacity 7rnds. single stack. Mag. release located near trigger guard. No heat sheild. Used a hydraulic buffer unit unlike the gas-retarded action of the other P7 series pistols. *Never made it past prototype*. Only 6 exist, HK owns them all.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010

  3. rappa29

    rappa29 JAFO

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    Wow! Super info! Thanks!
     
  4. Indy_Guy_77

    Indy_Guy_77 Thread Killer

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    Oh...and FYI, P7 mags will run you $60+ if/when you can find them.

    -J-
     
  5. TylerDurden

    TylerDurden Viva Hate CLM

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    I really like my P7, got it a couple years ago LNIB for a very good price.

    Very interesting piece of engineering, and worth owning for anyone who is into firearms design.

    Fixed barrel makes it a sweet shooter, and the fluted chamber and feed profile make it awesomely reliable.

    The prices on the P7s have gotten low enought that I can't believe more people don't own them. Just keep in mind that mags are expensive and hard to find, and that a holster that distributes the weight properly will have to be custom made.
     
  6. space_weazel

    space_weazel

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    I got a 'used' PSP, I prefer the PSP style in this instance to the other options, I paid about $600 a year ago. I have been very happy, it has a little holster wear but internally it was flawless and clean, and I'm glad I saved $400 over a 'Mint' version.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. bac1023

    bac1023

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    Awesome pistols!


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Laserlips

    Laserlips "Laus Deo"

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    [​IMG]


    I like P7's....:whistling:

    J.
     
  9. bluelineman

    bluelineman Infidel كافر

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    My only experience with them was fondling one at a gun show. It felt good except one thing. The squeeze cocker felt like cheap plastic when squeezing it. It felt clunky & not smooth. Am I wrong? Was it just because it was new? Otherwise, I've never heard one bad thing about them from actual owners.
     
  10. KalashniKEV

    KalashniKEV

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    I'm dying to try one out and see what all the hype is about...

    I'm thinking that it's just b/c they are so uncommon that people lust after them. If cocksqueezer was such a revolutionary innovation that makes it so much faster and more awesome, then surely someone else would have picked it up by now...
     
  11. Laserlips

    Laserlips "Laus Deo"

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    FWIW:

    In my experience it seems that potential HK P7 owners, with no prior experience with the HK P7, and it's unique "squeeze cocker", either love it at first shot, or simply don't care for it.

    It's not a matter of whether or not the P7 is unique, of high quality, and one of the most inherently accurate 9MM pistols ever made, but more whether the pistol "fits" the individuals hand.

    I had three CDNN A grade P7's but sold one of them to purchase a new HK P2000SK (V3).

    Now, having both to shoot and compare one against the other I find I prefer to cc the P2000sk over the P7 90% of the time.

    Why?

    My HK P2000sk (V3) is TDA, and offers 2 more rounds.. I have the option with the P2000sk to use the higher capacity 13rd mag from the full sized P2000 (w/X-grip).

    Amazingly, my P2000sk is as accurate as either of my P7's which is a surprise, because in my experience the P7 is more accurate than any other 9MM pistol I've ever owned.

    In fact in over half a century of firearms ownership I've only have 5 amazingly accurate pistols, and four of them were HK's. :dunno:

    (The 5th was a Walther P99c/AS).

    [​IMG]

    I do believe that "most" folks who shoot a P7 want one.. Not everyone mind you, but most "gun" folks who have shoot one of mine fell in love..

    I would recommend you give one a try, and if it's not to your taste there is always a market for a good used one. All of my P7's were "A" grade, and if you have the option I would suggest you try and get an "A" grade too... Lots of folks are well pleased with "B" grades, but I believe most people who buy "C" grades do so with the intentions of having the pistol refinished anyway.

    The surplus Lower Saxony Police imports (as sold by CDNN) were graded in Germany prior to export by HK people, and graded according to INTERNAL wear, NOT visible external wear.

    As with anything else it's easier to buy the "best" of whatever it is you are buying than buying one in poor condition expecting to "fix" it later.

    Just personal opinion, could be wrong.. Been wrong before.

    Best Wishes,

    Jesse

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Reswob

    Reswob

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    I'm gonna take a lot of flak for this, but I would strongly recommend that you get to shoot one before you look to buy one. It will likely change your mind about wanting to own one.
     
  13. Laserlips

    Laserlips "Laus Deo"

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    Res:

    Shooting ANY firearm (or one like it) before buying is NEVER bad advice.. :supergrin:

    Best Wishes,

    Jesse
     
  14. bac1023

    bac1023

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    ...of course, if he is a good judge of quality, it will make him want one even more. :tongueout:
     
  15. rappa29

    rappa29 JAFO

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    Unfortunately I haven't had the chance to handle one, but at the price the C grade pistols are going for, I'm willing to take a chance on one. If I completely hate it, I can make my money back reselling it.

    I've wanted one for the collection for a long time and they've only recently become affordable and available.

    Plus, it's exciting for me to learn a new manual of arms, even if it only ends up on strictly range duty. It sort of rounds out my menagerie of 9mm pistols that are all completely different from each other, 3913TSW (prerail), 2nd Gen G19 and '86 W.German P225.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2010
  16. Historian

    Historian NRA Benefactor Lifetime Member

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    This finish is quite rare in certain years. What year was yours made? If I may ask?

    It's a shame they no longer make this pistol.
     
  17. bac1023

    bac1023

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    Historian, I'm actually not sure of the year. The serial # is 021-1172, so maybe somebody with more P7 knowledge than I could answer that question.

    I do know the M10s weren't made that long. However, unlike some of the other P7 models, the blue M10s were the most rare.

    While all of them are rare, most of the P7M10s built were nickel, like mine.
     
  18. sigcalcatrant

    sigcalcatrant

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    Actually, concerning the P7M10, the blued ones are the rare ones. In fact, they are EXTREMELY rare, as bac points out.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2010
  19. sigcalcatrant

    sigcalcatrant

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    I bought one just because of the uniqueness, fit and finish, and cool egineering, and at first, didn't care for the feel of them. After about a hundred rounds or so, I realized how accurate I was shooting it, and was totally impressed with the trigger pull, and how easy it is to shoot it accurately and quickly.
     
  20. Historian

    Historian NRA Benefactor Lifetime Member

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    Sorry to say I didn't notice that was an M10. None-the-less a very fine pistol. Wow. That's just lovely...and you're right about the blued finishes.

    Mine is a p7m8 in the same finish and the reason why I asked the date was it turned out mine was one of only 500 in that years production (their last) and when I bought it...NIB...I had no idea...and I suspect the dealer didn't either...because the last time I saw one for sale online they wanted darn near $2000 for it.