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I budget and do not do impulse buys any longer. I like my money in the bank. I enjoy reading about all the guns on the forums, but I have what I want and just refrain from buying the latest of what I have. Now if I really have to have a new gun, I sell one to buy one. I didn't used to be this way, but I have now changed how I do things. Just me.
That's how I am. Down to five handguns and one AR. All bases covered from deep concealment to home defense. No need or want for more. The darn P365 has taken most of the carry time lately.
 

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When I was younger I indulged in a lot of retail therapy, buying new guns and clothes and whatnot. Fear of missing out. This is on sale TODAY ONLY. Plus, when I bought a new gun I thought maybe they'd discontinue it, maybe I'd need it in the future and it'd be sold out. I was very driven by the fear of missing out...

But I stopped to reflect and realize...I used to be happier going to the range with the only two guns that I owned - a 9mm pistol and my 870 Express shotgun. Now that I had way more guns I'd have to pack them all up and their appropriate accessories, and ammo, and tools, and lug all this crap to the range, uncase, spend very little time with each gun, go home, lug everything up the stairs, clean everything, etc. And so I stopped going as much, because traveling heavy made me unhappy. More guns didn't make me happy.

Once I got my Omega Seamaster...I thought i'd want a Rolex. And then I thought, when I get one, then what? Is it really going to make me happy? Honestly it would look gorgeous for a little while and then...then it would quickly wear off.

Plus when I moved recently, I couldn't help but think of how much money I wasted on all of the cheap trinkets and stuff i have accumulated over the years that were going straight into the trash. Cheap impulse buys I wasn't going to take with me on my move. Just a big waste of money for no reason...

And the older I get, I realize this stuff doesn't make me happy. The impulse buys don't make me happy. The going home and realizing the cheap crap you own keeps you further from savings, from investment retirements, etc.

So I've accumulated all the guns I want. Do I want more? Sure I always think about wanting something else. And something else. But then what? When does it end?

And when I got my Mustang GT, I loved it and then faster cars came out and suddenly I was talking to salesmen about trading for something else and realizing how many thousands I'd lose just to get into something. And then in 6 months, THAT car would make me unhappy. And I started to realize something:

  • More stuff didn't necessarily make me happy. The only thing that really made me happy gun-wise, was realizing what kind of gun I wanted, and then searching for it for up to a few years before finally buying it. If at any time I stopped wanting it during that time, I knew I didn't actually want it. For example, I like Marlin 1894 or 336 Cowboy Limited models made in CT. They're very rare guns. And so each time I have found one, it's after tirelessly searching and looking around for months, or years, and finally finding one. It's not something I just bought on Saturday because I thought it looked cool on Friday. It was something I actually wanted. And if the hunt for that particular gun hasn't lost its luster in months or years, I know I truly wanted it, and it was not an impulse item.
  • Realize that whatever you buy, buy something quality and have a plan to keep it. My aforementioned Omega? I plan to have it for life. No plans to sell or trade or upgrade. Worked with a guy with cheap watches who had over 50 Invictas etc. Nothing wrong with that. BUT he was ALWAYS buying more, so he wasn't happy with them. Something quality will satisfy you more.
  • Realize that there will ALWAYS be something later and greater that'll come out and you'll never be free of the "grass is greener" feeling so just be happy with it. My car was so cool and fresh and innovative when it was new. Now so many things have surpassed it in every way measurable. I wanted the next big thing. But I quickly learned, that'd never end until I was too broke to carry on.
  • Appreciating assets: I could get the same feeling of getting something new by buying something smart. When I buy new appliances i need, I am adding financial value to my home. When I am buying new stocks, I can feel good watching them get more valuable and don't have to feel like I bought crap I didn't need.
  • The luxury of security: In today's uncertain world, having money in investments and cash in the bank is much better of a luxury than anything else. And it feels great to know I can handle any financial emergency.
  • Be happy with what you have: go and admire the things you DO have; your Colt 1911, your Daniel Defense AR15, your car, whatever. You can learn to enjoy the **** you've already paid for.
  • Ask yourself when you do want to buy it, why? Are you worried about its rarity? About its price? Is it really on sale if you don't plan to buy it? If they made 1 million of something is it all that rare? It's not a good deal if you don't need or truly want it.
Don't get me wrong, I am no penniless Buddhist monk, and I have a ton of guns and a couple of cars including one that's just for the weekend. And I've spent a lot on stuff. But I realize the older I get, the more I go, "I have enough" and don't buy as much as I used to by a long shot. And I don't care to have the latest and greatest any more.
 

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As long as you can afford it and it doesn't cause you or yours a hardship, buy what you want.

Life is too short, enjoy it as much as you can.

When you get near the end, you don't want to say, "I wish I had...................".
My biggest fear is running out of money before I die. My second biggest fear is having some left. HH
 

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I like to look at paper adds. I circle what I am interested in. Then ask wife if it’s a good price. (Or think back)
There are @40 things I buy on sale. I buy even if I don’t need. (If it keeps).
 

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I always try to keep a few hundred extra dollars in the bank account specifically for impulse buys. Some of my favorite things have been impulse buys. I also keep my purchasing to a minimum and only buy things that I REALLY want. I hate having a bunch of stuff sitting around that never gets used.
 

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I admit I will buy a tabloid in the supermarket checkout line if it looks interesting. Good beach reading.
Great, You know that this is how MEN IN BLACK, knew about the ALIEN PLANS :kiss:
 

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I generally can afford wants and needs. At this point I happily pay for things that pay me back in time I can do things I would rather do. I could mow my own lawn and eat up half a day once a week but I pay someone else. I could buy patio furniture but I would rather make it myself with the time I didn’t spend mowing. In the kitchen if a gadget saves me time making good dinners it makes me more likely to cook good dinners vs order a pizza. Etc..
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Well my attitude about spending money is it was hard to accumlate - earn, I am a bargin shopper. I do not buy much impulse items, seldom. This Thanksgiving Weekend is Black Friday, the only impulse item was a New Cigar I wanted to try, it was good, bought at local B & M. Will by more online for war better price.

Why over pay for exact same item? I am my own favorite charity.
 

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Director of civil unrest
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When I was younger I indulged in a lot of retail therapy, buying new guns and clothes and whatnot. Fear of missing out. This is on sale TODAY ONLY. Plus, when I bought a new gun I thought maybe they'd discontinue it, maybe I'd need it in the future and it'd be sold out. I was very driven by the fear of missing out...

But I stopped to reflect and realize...I used to be happier going to the range with the only two guns that I owned - a 9mm pistol and my 870 Express shotgun. Now that I had way more guns I'd have to pack them all up and their appropriate accessories, and ammo, and tools, and lug all this crap to the range, uncase, spend very little time with each gun, go home, lug everything up the stairs, clean everything, etc. And so I stopped going as much, because traveling heavy made me unhappy. More guns didn't make me happy.

Once I got my Omega Seamaster...I thought i'd want a Rolex. And then I thought, when I get one, then what? Is it really going to make me happy? Honestly it would look gorgeous for a little while and then...then it would quickly wear off.

Plus when I moved recently, I couldn't help but think of how much money I wasted on all of the cheap trinkets and stuff i have accumulated over the years that were going straight into the trash. Cheap impulse buys I wasn't going to take with me on my move. Just a big waste of money for no reason...

And the older I get, I realize this stuff doesn't make me happy. The impulse buys don't make me happy. The going home and realizing the cheap crap you own keeps you further from savings, from investment retirements, etc.

So I've accumulated all the guns I want. Do I want more? Sure I always think about wanting something else. And something else. But then what? When does it end?

And when I got my Mustang GT, I loved it and then faster cars came out and suddenly I was talking to salesmen about trading for something else and realizing how many thousands I'd lose just to get into something. And then in 6 months, THAT car would make me unhappy. And I started to realize something:

  • More stuff didn't necessarily make me happy. The only thing that really made me happy gun-wise, was realizing what kind of gun I wanted, and then searching for it for up to a few years before finally buying it. If at any time I stopped wanting it during that time, I knew I didn't actually want it. For example, I like Marlin 1894 or 336 Cowboy Limited models made in CT. They're very rare guns. And so each time I have found one, it's after tirelessly searching and looking around for months, or years, and finally finding one. It's not something I just bought on Saturday because I thought it looked cool on Friday. It was something I actually wanted. And if the hunt for that particular gun hasn't lost its luster in months or years, I know I truly wanted it, and it was not an impulse item.
  • Realize that whatever you buy, buy something quality and have a plan to keep it. My aforementioned Omega? I plan to have it for life. No plans to sell or trade or upgrade. Worked with a guy with cheap watches who had over 50 Invictas etc. Nothing wrong with that. BUT he was ALWAYS buying more, so he wasn't happy with them. Something quality will satisfy you more.
  • Realize that there will ALWAYS be something later and greater that'll come out and you'll never be free of the "grass is greener" feeling so just be happy with it. My car was so cool and fresh and innovative when it was new. Now so many things have surpassed it in every way measurable. I wanted the next big thing. But I quickly learned, that'd never end until I was too broke to carry on.
  • Appreciating assets: I could get the same feeling of getting something new by buying something smart. When I buy new appliances i need, I am adding financial value to my home. When I am buying new stocks, I can feel good watching them get more valuable and don't have to feel like I bought crap I didn't need.
  • The luxury of security: In today's uncertain world, having money in investments and cash in the bank is much better of a luxury than anything else. And it feels great to know I can handle any financial emergency.
  • Be happy with what you have: go and admire the things you DO have; your Colt 1911, your Daniel Defense AR15, your car, whatever. You can learn to enjoy the **** you've already paid for.
  • Ask yourself when you do want to buy it, why? Are you worried about its rarity? About its price? Is it really on sale if you don't plan to buy it? If they made 1 million of something is it all that rare? It's not a good deal if you don't need or truly want it.
Don't get me wrong, I am no penniless Buddhist monk, and I have a ton of guns and a couple of cars including one that's just for the weekend. And I've spent a lot on stuff. But I realize the older I get, the more I go, "I have enough" and don't buy as much as I used to by a long shot. And I don't care to have the latest and greatest any more.
I think this is an old guy thing. I say that because I've come to the same realization in my old age.
I've not had a lot of nice things but I've had more than some people. It's the way we've been programmed in the US. Buy, buy, buy!! They sell us cheap crap that wears out quickly and then they sell us an even cheaper replacement and so on and so on. Let's face it, there's quite a thrill in buying a big, red, hotrod or 4X4.
If you look at the boom after WWII and it's history, it has led us here.
Time to break the cycle.
 

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RIP Stan Lee.. . .
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What a boring life to live on a need basis only. To H with that. Life is short and you can’t take it with ya.
My last 5 "impulse" buys were:
  • S&W Shield
  • Mossberg MC2c
  • CZ PCR
  • Henry 357/38 Steel Carbine
  • Samsung S6 Lite Tablet

Also Mags for above and ammo when I could find it. . .

Although Biden/Harris may have had something to do with those first 4 purchases. . .
:confused:

One advantage to working at home is that I'm saving a lot of money by not commuting and by not having to pay that 9% Oregon income tax. . .
 

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RIP Stan Lee.. . .
Joined
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I'm ok with all my impulse buys.... Even ones I didn't keep. I'd rather be a bit dissapointed at an impulse buy than later regret passing it up.
I hemmed and hawed about buying my Henry Carbine and by time I decide to buy, they were gone. Kicked myself in the azz. Next time I found one I bought it right away. . .
 

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Registered
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When I was younger I indulged in a lot of retail therapy, buying new guns and clothes and whatnot. Fear of missing out. This is on sale TODAY ONLY. Plus, when I bought a new gun I thought maybe they'd discontinue it, maybe I'd need it in the future and it'd be sold out. I was very driven by the fear of missing out...

But I stopped to reflect and realize...I used to be happier going to the range with the only two guns that I owned - a 9mm pistol and my 870 Express shotgun. Now that I had way more guns I'd have to pack them all up and their appropriate accessories, and ammo, and tools, and lug all this crap to the range, uncase, spend very little time with each gun, go home, lug everything up the stairs, clean everything, etc. And so I stopped going as much, because traveling heavy made me unhappy. More guns didn't make me happy.

Once I got my Omega Seamaster...I thought i'd want a Rolex. And then I thought, when I get one, then what? Is it really going to make me happy? Honestly it would look gorgeous for a little while and then...then it would quickly wear off.

Plus when I moved recently, I couldn't help but think of how much money I wasted on all of the cheap trinkets and stuff i have accumulated over the years that were going straight into the trash. Cheap impulse buys I wasn't going to take with me on my move. Just a big waste of money for no reason...

And the older I get, I realize this stuff doesn't make me happy. The impulse buys don't make me happy. The going home and realizing the cheap crap you own keeps you further from savings, from investment retirements, etc.

So I've accumulated all the guns I want. Do I want more? Sure I always think about wanting something else. And something else. But then what? When does it end?

And when I got my Mustang GT, I loved it and then faster cars came out and suddenly I was talking to salesmen about trading for something else and realizing how many thousands I'd lose just to get into something. And then in 6 months, THAT car would make me unhappy. And I started to realize something:

  • More stuff didn't necessarily make me happy. The only thing that really made me happy gun-wise, was realizing what kind of gun I wanted, and then searching for it for up to a few years before finally buying it. If at any time I stopped wanting it during that time, I knew I didn't actually want it. For example, I like Marlin 1894 or 336 Cowboy Limited models made in CT. They're very rare guns. And so each time I have found one, it's after tirelessly searching and looking around for months, or years, and finally finding one. It's not something I just bought on Saturday because I thought it looked cool on Friday. It was something I actually wanted. And if the hunt for that particular gun hasn't lost its luster in months or years, I know I truly wanted it, and it was not an impulse item.
  • Realize that whatever you buy, buy something quality and have a plan to keep it. My aforementioned Omega? I plan to have it for life. No plans to sell or trade or upgrade. Worked with a guy with cheap watches who had over 50 Invictas etc. Nothing wrong with that. BUT he was ALWAYS buying more, so he wasn't happy with them. Something quality will satisfy you more.
  • Realize that there will ALWAYS be something later and greater that'll come out and you'll never be free of the "grass is greener" feeling so just be happy with it. My car was so cool and fresh and innovative when it was new. Now so many things have surpassed it in every way measurable. I wanted the next big thing. But I quickly learned, that'd never end until I was too broke to carry on.
  • Appreciating assets: I could get the same feeling of getting something new by buying something smart. When I buy new appliances i need, I am adding financial value to my home. When I am buying new stocks, I can feel good watching them get more valuable and don't have to feel like I bought crap I didn't need.
  • The luxury of security: In today's uncertain world, having money in investments and cash in the bank is much better of a luxury than anything else. And it feels great to know I can handle any financial emergency.
  • Be happy with what you have: go and admire the things you DO have; your Colt 1911, your Daniel Defense AR15, your car, whatever. You can learn to enjoy the **** you've already paid for.
  • Ask yourself when you do want to buy it, why? Are you worried about its rarity? About its price? Is it really on sale if you don't plan to buy it? If they made 1 million of something is it all that rare? It's not a good deal if you don't need or truly want it.
Don't get me wrong, I am no penniless Buddhist monk, and I have a ton of guns and a couple of cars including one that's just for the weekend. And I've spent a lot on stuff. But I realize the older I get, the more I go, "I have enough" and don't buy as much as I used to by a long shot. And I don't care to have the latest and greatest any more.
You’ve discovered a form of minimalism. It’s not just about less stuff, but stuff that brings value to your life.

 

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AAAMAD
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30,986 Posts
Complains about impulse shopping and buying wants vs needs

Admits to buying massive quantities of cigars because they’re on sale.......

seems legit.
 

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02
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21,342 Posts
There’s not much I need or want. The stuff I want tends to be on the higher end so I usually put it on the back burner and if I want it down the road I get it. For example I’m considering upgrading the audio system in my truck which will run me about $10k. If I want to do it in a few months I will, if I’m not thinking about it in the next few months I won’t.
 
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