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Important question for you revolver guys.

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by nsl, Jan 4, 2010.

  1. nsl

    nsl

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    I recently posted about a S&W 15-2 that I had found. I used the sticky about checking a used revolver, and bought it. Now that I got it home, there is one cylinder, or at least the notch at the back that the "tit" above the trigger locks into, that has a sliver of metal shaved off the low side. I can turn the cylinder to another chamber when the gun is not ready to fire. I can't turn the cylinder with the hammer back, or with the trigger pulled and the hammer down. I think this gun may of been dropped, and the cylinder knocked open, and thus it shave a little bit of metal out of one of the notches. Question is is this gun safe? Can it be fixed? I really don't see how it can unless it has an new cylinder installed, or a skilled gunsmith could kind of weld and recut the notch. Should I take this gun back and show the dealer the problem, or am I more than likely screwed? Damn shame as I have wanted one of these for a while, and it has target hammer, trigger, and a smooth action.
     
  2. Myke_Hart

    Myke_Hart Handloader

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    Sounds like you should have it checked out by a competent smith to be sure.

    Almost sounds if the there is a weak cylinder stop spring or excessive wear on the cylinder stop itself.
     

  3. just for fun

    just for fun

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    Two thoughts. What a find and what a shame! These old timers are starting to really demand the bucks if they are 6inchers and blued. Original grips only add to the kitty. I've got the same gun BTW and would not consider wielding on the cylinder. If the gun is a keeper (95%+) call Smith and see what it would cost to replace the cylinder. If the cost will take you over what you wanted to spend, try taking it back where you bought it. Refunds are hard to come by so you may want to think about "up grading"
     
  4. nsl

    nsl

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    Thought about just seeing if he would let me trade it toward something differant.Oh, and would S&W even be able to replace the cylinder on this gun due to its age?
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2010
  5. ronin.45

    ronin.45

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    Smith should be able to make it right even being older.

    I would definitely have a good Smith look it over before shipping it out.
    You never know it might be a simpler fix than you think.
     
  6. hogship

    hogship Patriot Extraordinaire

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    The notches in the cylinder are supposed to have a beveled edge on one side. This notch mates to the cylinder catch (I think that's what it's called, and probably what you are referring to as a "tit".)

    It's possible the cylinder isn't damaged beyond use. If it was forced in some way, then the cylinder catch may very well be a part of the total problem.

    A good gunsmith will be able to give you an evaluation.

    It's very possible it isn't as bad as you're thinking.

    hog
     
  7. nsl

    nsl

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    The notch in question just has had the edge shaved off to where there is not enough to keep it from spinning back in the dirrection of the bevel. I think the gun is safe to shoot, but this cylinder may prove a problem in the future as it gets even more wear, and it also could cause problems if I ever plan on selling it. I probably will take it back and just see if I can trade toward a glock, or one of those new Ruger 10/22's that look like an AR. I payedto much for the pistol for it to not be right.
     
  8. sourdough44

    sourdough44

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    I've heard of guy's having good luck dealing with S&W. It may have a few years but I'd check with them over a private gunsmith. I had a fire damaged mini-14 & called Ruger, they said ship it. They said it was toast, but sold me a replacement 'at cost'. A relative had the fire.
     
  9. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo Ancient Member Millennium Member

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    May be possible to re-face the star, shim back the cylinder and then tighten the barrel by one turn. This can be done by a good smith, the smooth action will still be there and the gun will still be 100% original. Or optionally, replace the star entirely and retime the gun, though it will lose some of that silky smoothness acquired over the years. Either way, it is fixable.

    The key is finding a good revolver smith; most have become Fudds or else moved into contest crap/45 auto work. I knew a guy years ago who could have done this but he is gone now. RIP Lew, mi amigo.

    Ronaldo - every vintage Smith is worth resurrecting...
     
  10. armorplated

    armorplated

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    Definitely take it back and try to get your money back. If all sales are final, then ship it to Smith and Wesson and get it fixed right. Consider it money spent to learn a lesson. If I had all the money I've spent learning lessons I'd be a rich man.
     
  11. Ghost Tracker

    Ghost Tracker

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    Agree with above post. If diagnosis & repair are required, there's no better place or value than a return trip to the builder, S&W. They'll know what's what, they'll tell you, and (after you okay the cost) they'll make it good to go! Really doesn't matter the age of the revolver, there aren't many companies (and even fewer firearm companies) who'll treat you as well as Smith & Wesson Customer Service. Let us know how things turn-out. Good Luck!
     
  12. diamondmike

    diamondmike

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    Its hard for me to picture in my mind what you are describing and without seeing the gun it makes it hard to figure out exactly whats going on.

    But it sounds like the part called the hand may be bent a little causing one or more chambers not to line up right.

    If you could post a picture it would be alot easier to understand what your talking about.
     
  13. nsl

    nsl

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    Well, took it back and traded toward a Ruger SR-22 rifle. Shop owner said he had never seen something like that before. He said it didn't seem to be a safety issue, but it wasn't right and he offered to buy it back. So, I just bought the Ruger.
     
  14. ilgunguygt

    ilgunguygt Enslaved in IL

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    Well, the one thing you learned through this should be that you have found a good gunshop. No fuss, no crap, took it back. Thats the way it should be. It would probably be a good idea to give this man more of your business.
     
  15. user

    user VaLegalDefense

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    Problem seems to have been resolved, but here's my observations for future reference:

    Nope, it's too dangerous to shoot. The notch in the cylinder under each chamber is shaped to fit the cylinder lock which pokes up from underneath the cylinder. If the cylinder lock doesn't fit into the notch tightly, then the cylinder can move while a cartridge is being fired. That means that the chamber may not be lined up with the barrel at the time of combustion, which means all the pressure will go out in all directions, usually blowing up the topstrap of the revolver. You'll be lucky if the shrapnel doesn't kill or seriously injure you when that happens. Notice I said, "when", not "if".