Immediate Crock Pot Help Needed...

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by Alchemy, May 25, 2005.

  1. Alchemy

    Alchemy Senior Member

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    My wife left for Seattle and i'm forced to take care of myself.

    I just brazed a pork loin roast and put it in the crock pot.
    How much liquid should I add to keep it from burning?. I
    intend to add Ragu and make spaghette sauce out of the left-
    overs.

    Should I add the Ragu now, or just put some water in the crock?
     
  2. noway

    noway

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    I would say enough liquid to cover the meat is what I do. Never tried ragu in a crock pot, but i bet it would work if the heat doesn't burn it or cause it to stick. On hi setting with one of my rivals, I can burn certain liquids. So I must stir on ocassion.


    Good luck.

    If you have avl lamb necks, try some of those for a like beef texture but rich in flavor. I normally cook a pot or 2 per month with carrots, onions and a few other items in a thick beef broth.
     

  3. VictorLouis

    VictorLouis

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    ;m

    I would ad NO water at all. First of all, the loin may have already been injected with broth by the provider;Q . At the very least, there's enough moisture and fat content in there that you won't have an issue. Just keep it on LOW, with the lid on, and plan on having cook at least 6-7hrs depending on how you like it done.;a
     
  4. Alchemy

    Alchemy Senior Member

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    noway, excellent suggestion on the lamb, unfortunately my wife
    dispises lamb and I love it...so to suffice, I don't get any.

    Victor it's a costco 3 pack, so I don't know if it's been
    injected, but I doubt it. I've added a little water to it,
    but it looks very lean. It's on low, but i'm probably going
    to have to add some liquid to it.

    thanks
     
  5. Ron3

    Ron3

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    Put enough water in it to cover most of the meat.

    Ron3
     
  6. Alchemy

    Alchemy Senior Member

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    Thank you Ron....I just covered it to 3/4, i'll ck it before I go
    to bed.
     
  7. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    Since you wanted a tomatoey deal anyway, next time cut it into 3" chunks,
    brown'em good in a skillet, then toss the chunks, some Stewed Tomatoes,
    browned onion quarters, chopped garlic, black pepper, and a cup of red wine
    in the Crock Pot and let it go till the pork gets tenda!

    Serve it over mashed potatoes or creamy Polenta...

    Yeah man!

    ;c
     
  8. Dandapani

    Dandapani

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    +1, I've done beef chuck roast this way. NO WATER! Enough moisture in the meat.
     
  9. Ron3

    Ron3

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    I've never put in too much water. How is that even possible?

    Whats it going to do? Make it too moist? Too dry? I'm really curious what harm it could do.

    It says in the instructions to always use liquid too for more even cooking. Makes sense to me. ^8

    Ron3
     
  10. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    you need water(liquid) to transfer the heat and make it work right.

    Usually a cup or two will do it.

    Some veggies to lift the meat helps also.
     
  11. VictorLouis

    VictorLouis

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    I've always felt that most meats come out tasting boiled when they're somewhat submerged in water. This is fine if you intend to shred it and make stew, or the sauce that the poster described. When you ad no water, and place the cut fat side UP, you get more of the roasted texture and flavor you would in the oven.


    Keep in mind, the addition of potatoes, carrots and onions to the pot will also leach out lots of water.
    ;)
     
  12. Dandapani

    Dandapani

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    Again, a +1. Listen to Victor!
     
  13. Alchemy

    Alchemy Senior Member

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    lastnight I considered all the water suggestions. I added about
    2" to the crock and slept on it. I had a great pork sandwich
    for lunch.

    Today I added some olives, a clove of garlic and a can of Ragu
    to the pork. I'll add some partially cooked egg noodles to the
    sauce in a bit.

    I'm surprised that you can't smell it.....Mmmmmm

    thanx for the suggestions!
     
  14. NRA_guy

    NRA_guy Unreconstructed

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    I have never tried starting out with a dry crock pot. I will give it a shot. Can I do this with a dry rub?

    I Have a little aluminum metal thing that came with my pressure cooker that raises the meat up out of the liquid. I might try using that, too, to keep the meat drier.

    I really love pork and beef roasts cooked in a crock.

    But I HATE so-called crock pot barbecue when folks add the barbecue sauce and a little water up front. Meat "boiled" in barbecue sauce takes on a terrible taste. A few barbecue joints actually try to sell it as real barbecue.

    Crock pots pull low electrical current. I have one of those little plug in timers, and frequently I just put it all in the pot and turn it on at bed time. Then I let the timer cut it off several hours later. The next morning, it's good to go.

    Whatever you do, spray the crock pot with PAM before you start.

    Cleaning up is a pain.
     
  15. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    Read the instructions that came with it.
     
  16. VictorLouis

    VictorLouis

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    You can certainly experiement to see what you feel works best. I'm just speaking from personal experience. The reason to place meats fat side UP is two-fold.

    One, the fat will trickle-down through the meat, keeping it moist. Two, the spices you add on the fat layer will be carried along with it, with all of the additional flavor.
     
  17. First Glock

    First Glock

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    Water, never. I always use beer. Stews, roasts, whatever - it's always beer. Very tasty.
     
  18. NRA_guy

    NRA_guy Unreconstructed

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    OK. Yesterday I tried dry crock pot cooking for the first time. I rubbed a boneless pork loin with jerk seasoning and threw it in with no water or beer or other liquid.

    I let it cook for about 4 or 5 hours as I recall. Not exactly sure about the time.

    It was good---fork tender and pretty, but a little too dry for my taste. It made about 1/2 inch of liquid in the bottom of the pot, whick I put back over the meat.

    Overall it was a good thing and I'll try it again some day. Maybe some cut of meat with more fat in it.

    But the answer is that you can definitely do dry crock pot cooking.