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I'm off a bit, ALWAYS

Discussion in 'Tactics and Training' started by hamburger, Mar 5, 2010.

  1. hamburger

    hamburger

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    My shots are consistantly off to the left and down when shooting at the range.
    I shoot a bit low, but straight, when shooting without sighting.

    When aiming, is the fact that I use one eye to focus the cause of my shot being off center? That's what I'm assuming because without focusing on the front sight, my shots are straighter. I shoot with a squared parallel stance and/or right leg back. Whichever stance I use, I'm constantly off south west.

    These pictures are 20 rounds at 10 yards for each Glock that I shot with.
     
  2. rboatright

    rboatright

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    1) try shooting from a rest. Grab a sandbag and triple check your sight picture and eliminate your trigger pull and hand movements from the issue. Pull dead slow and see where the bullets go and what the group size is. If they're off from a rest, then you need to adjust the sight.

    but

    2) you may have a very slight flinch. Your second picture sure looks like a flinch. Do you do much dry fire practice? if the groups from rest don't show those flyers out to the sw, and your freehands do, you need to start working on that. have someone else load your mags and intermingle snap caps at random locations so you can try to see yourself flinching. Spend some time dry firing.
     

  3. hamburger

    hamburger

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    Dry firing? Yes, like crazy. These are my first 2 handguns and when I got them, I could not stop dry firing them.

    I will try your suggestion of shooting them using a tool such as a sandbag or something to hold it steady.

    Both Glocks has never been tampered with. What are the chances that they both came from the factory with the sights off?
     
  4. rboatright

    rboatright

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    not much. That's why I suggested it's probably you. :)

    You could be mis-aligning your sight picture. You could have a slight flinch, you could be pushing on the trigger to the left.

    When you're dry firing, as the gun goes off, does the sight picture change _at all_ ? are you able to dry fire at a target and see the front sight not move?

    If you can, the next step is to try that same dry fire practice with a coin balanced on the front sight. If you're pushing or flinching and can't see it, but it's there, then the coin will consistently fall to one side or the other. (in your case, to the right.)
     
  5. hamburger

    hamburger

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    I like that. Sounds like a neat little trick. Thanks
     
  6. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

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    Dry firing does not help to diagnose shooting errors as much as

    - mixing dummy rounds in

    - having a 3rd party observe you while you shoot

    At 30ft, there are not a whole lot of things you can screw up, so with observation and using dummy rounds in the mix, it's relatively easy to spot, and most times correct.

    In the final analysis, if the firearm's POA = POI, you are disturbing the sight picture immediately before, at or just immediately after the trigger breaks. We generally do these things because of

    - flinching
    - recoil anticipation
    - lack of proper follow thru
    - attempting to "look over" the gun's sights to see where the shot hit
    - attempting to pull the gun down in preparation for the next shot (very similar to recoil anticipation, but is really a result of wanting to maintain sight alignment with faster shooting).

    The corrective actions for the above would be (again, the assumption here is that the gun is 100% functional, and accurate)

    - stop flinching. :) This can be minimized by doubling up on hearing protection (not as loud muzzle report), shooting outdoors in daylight (less muzzle flash, not as loud)

    - stop anticipating recoil. Mixing dummy rounds in with live rounds will help you to see if you do this.

    - practice good use of the shooting fundamentals, and in particular, follow thru.

    - don't spend too much time trying to see where you hit.

    - don't be in a rush to make the next shot. Each & every single shot should go thru that mental "pre-flight" checklist of the fundamentals all the way up to follow thru. Make every shot count, take your time.

    'Drew
     
  7. PhoneCop

    PhoneCop TeleDetective

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    The image on the right of your shots with the 30 are a classic example of the too fast pres on the trigger, often referred to as jerking. Most of your shots are well placed and grouped nicely. But, on those few shots you pressed just a little too quickly.

    I am uncertain as to why you have those oddly arcing flyers in the first picture.

    At 10 yards I wouldn't sweat it. You have no systemic issue, you are simply human and prone to error. Shoot more and try to enjoy it more.

    :wavey:
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010