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This is a must read making the rounds on the internet. Puts current events into perspective.


Imagine you were born in 1900. On your 14th birthday, World War I starts, and ends on your 18th birthday. 22 million people perish in that war. Later in the year, a Spanish Flu epidemic hits the planet and runs until your 20th birthday. 50 million people die from it in those two years. Yes, 50 million. On your 29th birthday, the Great Depression begins. Unemployment hits 25%, the World GDP drops 27%. That runs until you are 33. The country nearly collapses along with the world economy. When you turn 39, World War II starts. You aren’t even over the hill yet. And don’t try to catch your breath. On your 41st birthday, the United States is fully pulled into WWII. Between your 39th and 45th birthday, 75 million people perish in the war. At 50, the Korean War starts. 5 million perish. At 55 the Vietnam War begins and doesn’t end for 20 years. 4 million people perish in that conflict. On your 62nd birthday you have the Cuban Missile Crisis, a tipping point in the Cold War. Life on our planet, as we know it, should have ended. Great leaders prevented that from happening. When you turn 75, the Vietnam War finally ends. Think of everyone on the planet born in 1900. How do you survive all of that? When you were a kid in 1985 and didn’t think your 85 year old grandparent understood how hard school was. And how mean that kid in your class was. Yet they survived through everything listed above. Perspective is an amazing art, refined as time goes on, and enlightening like you wouldn’t believe. Let’s try and keep things in perspective.
 

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My dad was born in 1909 and his entire family with nine kids came down with smallpox. He lost two of his siblings.
Times were real rough back then.
 

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One of my grandparents was an infant during the Oklahoma Land Rush and she was the youngest of my grandparents. All were born before the Wright Brothers and all lived to see men walking on the moon. I can't think of another period in history when such giant steps were achieved in so many different scientific areas during the span of a single lifetime.
 

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Both of my Grandmothers were born in 1900.
One died in March of 1963, at age 62.
One died in January of 1972, at age 71.

They both had HARD lives.

One Grandfather born in 1888. Died in '51.
One Grandfather born in 1899. Died in '51.
Ironically, both died on Christmas Day, of Cancer.
 

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Excellent post, and good medicine for the Chicken Little brigade.
LOL you're looking at it completely wrong.

The relative safety and security we've experienced the last 40+ years has been an anomaly. Things are likely to get worse from here, not better. In the larger scheme of things 9/11 and the GWOT is barely a blip.

9 countries completely ceased to exist in the 20th century. Many more had violent revolutions, massive civil upheavals, civil wars, genocide that killed millions, and/or government or economic collapses.

We are the world's oldest democratic-style government. (Yes, we are the Republic, a sub-type.) We've long outlasted the duration Aztec Empire. Hell, the White House since it was rebuilt has stood longer than that Empire. Everything has a beginning, a middle, and an end.

Some other fun facts:
  • Our Constitution is long in the tooth, routinely ignored or "interpreted" into meaninglessness.
  • Corruption is rampant in government.
  • Elections are rife with voter fraud.
  • Laws are being ignored by the government and politicians at every level.
  • We're no longer one people with a common culture and similar goals.
  • At least 22% of the population actively wants to destroy the United States as it exists today, believing that it is no different than Nazi Germany.
  • Debt (Federal, State, Private) is surging to unprecedented levels that are completely unsustainable, with no end in sight.
  • 30 million people lost their jobs in the last 6 weeks.
  • War with China is looming on the 10 year horizon.

This post is good medicine for the "everything is fine, everything is always going to be fine" brigade.

It's later than you think.
 

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My granddad, on Dad's side, was born in 1900. Lived to be 90.
 

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My grandfather lived from the horse and buggy days, plowing with a draft horse, to see the space shuttle.

I will never live long enough see those leaps.

Sure bad things happen, but a lot of good does too. My grandparents on either side never spoke of the bad.

You guys dwell on the bad too much.
 

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My grandfather was born in 1898 and grandmother in 1899.
Farmers in East Texas all their lives. My grandfather was enroute or had just got to Europe when WW1 ended. He came back home and continued farming the rest of his life.
My grandmother never did believe the Moon Landings were real. She thought it was Hollywood.
I remember my grandfather plowing the fields with Mules when I was a little boy.
They saw a helluva lot of changes.
I still have a old Damascus twist barrel single shot 16 gauge shotgun that my grandfather had.

ETA:
We have precious few pictures of our family.
Here is a pic of my Mother, Uncle and my Grandfather. Must have been right after WW2 as my uncle had just got back from fighting the Japs in the Pacific.
I do remember seeing rifles from the Pacific and Europe from our relatives they had brought back when I was little. They would have them in closets or behind the doors in there houses on the farms.

 

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My father was born in 1895. In October of 1918 he was gassed in the Bois de Bantheville in France while serving in D Co. 354th Inf. 89th Div. His lungs were burned and he developed pneumonia and was hospitalized.He somehow avoided the Spanish Flu but wasn't able to return home until August 1919.He then resumed his job with the railroad,lived thru the Depression ,married in 1941, raised 4 children between 1943 and 1955 (WWII & Korea) before he passed away from heart failure at age 64 one month before my 5th birthday.I can only wonder what he would think of the way this country is today!
 

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I will never live long enough see those leaps.
How old are you? I ask because I think you might be missing some big leaps. The world now is a completely different place than it was a half century ago. Think of all the things that didn't even exist in 1970 that are already obsolete today- VCRs, cable tv, DVD/CDs, ATMs, cellular telephones.

Look at all the things we are able to do with that super computer that we all carry around in our pockets today (We call it a "phone" but it's really a super computer with a high tech telephone application!) If I'd have been told in 1989 that I'd be able to pull a computer out of my pocket that was smaller than my walkman, touch a few pictures on a screen and have toilet paper dropped at my doorstep 36-48 hours later, I would have laughed my ass off and called B.S.!

Advancements in vehicles- Not only computerization but synchronization with that super computer in your pocket. They're also starting to drive themselves.

I think you've seen a lot more leaps than you realize my friend...
 

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My Grandmother on my father's side was born in 1903. She died in 2006 at the age of 103. She married my Grandfather in 1919 when she was 16 and he was ten years older, born in 1893. They both told me a lot about their lives except I could never get him to talk about the war. I wish they could have told me more, and the same with my parents.

But one time my mother told me about what it was like during WWII when she worked as a secretary in Washington DC and lived in a boarding house and how much she enjoyed the experience and how she thought it was an exiting time to live through and how there will never
be a time like that again

My mom was an Iowa farm girl but after high school she went to secretarial school in Denver and my dad was stationed there for some kind of training program with the Army. After they met he had another assignment in Washington DC and she applied for a job there. They kept in touch for the duration of the war and married in 1946 after the war was over. I was born a year later and in my lifetime I've seen the world change quite a bit and not entirely for the better. In some way yes, in other ways, no.
 

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How old are you? I ask because I think you might be missing some big leaps. The world now is a completely different place than it was a half century ago. Think of all the things that didn't even exist in 1970 that are already obsolete today- VCRs, cable tv, DVD/CDs, ATMs, cellular telephones.

Look at all the things we are able to do with that super computer that we all carry around in our pockets today (We call it a "phone" but it's really a super computer with a high tech telephone application!) If I'd have been told in 1989 that I'd be able to pull a computer out of my pocket that was smaller than my walkman, touch a few pictures on a screen and have toilet paper dropped at my doorstep 36-48 hours later, I would have laughed my ass off and called B.S.!

Advancements in vehicles- Not only computerization but synchronization with that super computer in your pocket. They're also starting to drive themselves.

I think you've seen a lot more leaps than you realize my friend...
I am 59.
You make some good points but horse travel to space shuttle is a leap I will never see in my lifetime.
 

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I am 59.
You make some good points but horse travel to space shuttle is a leap I will never see in my lifetime.
Things keep going the way they are you may see the space shuttle back to horse travel... :couch:
 

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Health was not taken for granted back then. People were very careful to not get injured. Before antibiotics were discovered, a simple cut could be fatal.

I remember a story told by my grandparents (b. 1890) about my mom (b. 1918) almost dying from an infection caused by a splinter in her foot.

I marvel at the things they lived through.
 
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