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I want to hunt...where do I start??

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Landogie, Jan 21, 2006.

  1. Landogie

    Landogie

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    I have been wanting to get into hunting for the past year now and I am finally going to start this year with turkey season in April. I HAVE NO CLUE WHERE TO START. I have no one around here to teach me. None of my friends or family hunt so I'm a bit lost. I also have no equipment (but I do have several Bass Pro gift card sitting around) other that my Remington 870 Mag. I need all the information you guys can give me in order to bag a bird come spring. I will be hunting in East Tennessee. I have been searching through the TWRA website and I find it very confusing as to the exact permits I must obtain and such. I am thinking that I will probably hunt a wildlife management area or public hunting area managed by TWRA because I don't know anyone with enough land to hunt on. If I did find a nice piece of private land to hunt how do I go about asking the landowner's permission. Any info would tell me any more than I already know. The only hunting education I really have is what Ive found online or seen on OLN. Thanks a lot!!!
     
  2. bustedknee

    bustedknee The Snowflakes have invaded GT

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    Git yourself in a good hunter safety course.

    They will teach you gun safety, hunter ethics, and you will need the certification in some states.
    A good course will also include live fire on a range.
    You will meet some nice folks in the class; maybe some future hunting partners. You will meet old-timers as well as folks just like yourself.

    What you learn when class is out of session can be as valuable as what you learn in class. The advice and opinions will be flowing.

    Alaska offers several state-sponsored classes such as Hunter Safety, Archery, Muzzle Loaders, Shotgunning, and Bear Baiting.

    In many places you can join local hunt clubs. Remember to listen and learn and always do more than your share of the work. You will be invited back.
     

  3. Landogie

    Landogie

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    Tennessee does require a hunter's safety course in order to hunt. I am going this Sat. and will get my certificate. Whats the next step?
     
  4. RJ Schuknecht

    RJ Schuknecht

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    Check out the National Wild Turkey Federation at NWTF.org. They will probably have members in Tennessee who can give you a lot of help.
     
  5. BillRiley

    BillRiley

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    If you are goign to hunt on TN WMA's check to see what hunting equipment is allowed. I know atleast one WMA (wolf river) in west TN is archery only, others, I think allow, muzzle loaders.
     
  6. Hunterjbb

    Hunterjbb

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    your willing to spend.. your going to need a few things. Ask the guys at the Hunter's safety course also about this.

    Clothing: Jacket,hat,pants,shirt.. Camo if your turkey hunting something to match your area of hunting and the time frame of the year, and if nothing else Woodland Camo pattern(stuff army's wears) is decent all around. You may need Hunter's Orange also, not sure about your local rules.

    Rain Gear--Gore-Tex if you can,at least a poncho if nothing else. depends on how dedicated your gonna be..about hunting in the rain. Not a bad thing to have no matter what, also works well keeping cold wind off of you.

    Might want to cosider a Face mask, or you can camo paint your face.

    Good boots; comfortable Gore-Tex lined boots.. nothing worse the wet feet. Insulated or not up to you. I would suggest some form of insulation..

    A decent pocket knife with a 3-3.5" blade, I would suggest one of the many Swiss Army Lockblades, there are a million knives out there. Buck, Cold steel, Gerber, etc.. You don't need one with a blade that's 12" long.. A Good pocket knife will suffice for most game you take.

    Turkey calls.. to start out with probably a push box, or box call of some sort.. Shell's for your shotgun..

    Compass and if you like a GPS.. maps of area your are in. Small first aid kit..

    Day pack, and something to carry water in, lot's of packs come with hyrdation packs.. not a bad idea. A Seat for in the woods, foamy or web seat.. You want to be comfortable and quite and still.

    You could probably skip the rain gear at first, up to you.. and the day pack, but you should carry water somehow.. Turkey hunting Vests are a great although not a "basic" need..

    Good luck.. above all else learn SAFETY.. It's more important to be safe then it is to shoot something..

    DO NOT SHOOT unless you can SEE what you are shooting at. So many hunting accidents happen cause people shoot "cause they heard something"..

    Jeff

    PS: Practice with your calls and scout the area you want to hunt early before the season starts.
     
  7. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

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    You've recieved a lot of good advice already. Hunter safety will give you a brief introduction, and will put you in touch with people who can answer some of your more elaborate questions. Your state's game department will also be a big help, in the form of an annual hunting regulation book. That will tell you where you can hunt, what you can hunt for, and what shotgun/loads you will need to be legal.

    The single most important thing you can do is to remind yourself why you're hunting in the first place. It is all about the experience. Whether or not you take home a bird is a distant second behind enjoying your day out in the wild. I've come home from some great trips that I will remember for the rest of my life, and have come home with an empty game bag.
     
  8. ECVMatt

    ECVMatt

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    My local club teaches hunter safety and we get lots of new members that way. We consider it an honor and a duty to the sport to help out anyone who is really interested.

    I am sure the folks in TN would feel the same way.

    Good luck, welcome, and I hope you find all the help you need.

    Matt
     
  9. bustedknee

    bustedknee The Snowflakes have invaded GT

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    A guided hunt the first time!

    You can see first hand how it is done and stand a good chance of getting to eat your own bird. The guide will most likely explain what you are doing and why. He will point out signs of turkeys feeding, roosting, etc.

    Network. Join a hunt club.

    Read. Books and magazines are a great source of information.

    Watch TV. The Outdoor Network, or whatever it is called, has a lot of hunting shows.

    Bear in mind that many of the above sources consider themselves experts but aren't really. The TV shows seem to be the worst to me.

    But, most important, is get out into the woods. Go every chance you get and observe.
     
  10. Toml

    Toml

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    Depending on how you asked I would be inclined to answer, "No, you may not hunt on my land." Or "Yes, you may join me for a hunt on my land."

    Good luck. Sit still and check for ticks after each hunt.
     
  11. Hunterjbb

    Hunterjbb

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    Some things i've found out.. First you have to find out who owns the property. Check for posting signs, indication someone already hunts, the landowner may not want hunters or a club uses the property, don't let this discourage you, they maybe old. County tax records are great for this, alot of counties have that stuff online now also.

    I always try to meet face to face.. Calling is ok but some folks just plain want to look at you.. and it's a little more difficult for them to just shut you out if your standing in front of them :)

    DO NOT show up in Camo or looking like Rambo.. or with guns bristling all over..

    Be polite at all times.. Answer all questions honestly, inquire about all types of hunting, i.e. bow, rifle, shotgun.. some will let you hunt with one but not the other. If things are looking good enquire about any restrictions they may have, can't hunt here, not on these days etc.. If your inclined tell them you will post the property..

    Enquire if they would consider leasing the property, reassure them your not going to have 25 people hunting, unless that's what your looking for.

    Get used to rejection.. it's gonna happen and not all folks are very nice about how they tell you..

    Your probably going to get turned down more often then not, don't get discouraged though and ask them for a number to call and check the following year..

    One other thing, whenever I was given permission to hunt i've always done something unexpected for the owner, small gift, fixed a gate on a fence, fixed a fence, cleaned up a section of property, trails etc.. Send a thank you card.. And i always tried to leave the property as good or better then when i was given permission.

    Hope this helps.

    Jeff.
     
  12. jolt8me

    jolt8me Your the devil

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    my family owns some farm land in spring city around 100 acres. We live in michigan obviously so we dont use it for farming. i dont know if thats close to you or not but if you want i can ask and i dont see any problem with you hunting on that. just a thought.
     
  13. Landogie

    Landogie

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    WOW...that is very nice of you to offer. I'm not exactly sure where spring city is but I will google it and see if its in my vacinity. Thnaks a lot for the offer!
     
  14. Landogie

    Landogie

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    It looks like it would be about an hours drive from where I live. I live in Farragut (Knoxville suburb) which is where I 40/75 split. If you went straight instead of taking the forks (which you cant) It would be directly in line with me. I am interested if the offer is still on the table. Thanks alot.
     
  15. Fox

    Fox Varmit Control

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    You can start out with paying an outfitter for your first hunts. Then you will know what you are doing.
     
  16. frank4570

    frank4570

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    It should probably be mentioned that turkey is maybe the MOST difficult game animal to hunt.They are smart,have great hearing and great eyesight. Easily spooked. If you move, they are gone. If you look out of place, they are gone.If you don't sound right , they are gone. I think going out with an experienced turkey hunter is probably a great plan.