I think he likes me...K9 guys inside please

Discussion in 'Cop Talk' started by silverado_mick, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. silverado_mick

    silverado_mick

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    Our dept recently got a K9 (4 months ago). Great dog (Brando) and handler. Here's the rub...none of our officers can get near the dog. He's very aggressive and suspicious of all of us. I've worked with a lot of dogs in the past and I know each one is different, but I'd like to get to the point where we can at least get him in the station without worrying about him biting us.

    I was on a call with him earlier and the dog approached me in a friendly manner, sniffed my hand and went to jump up on me to sniff my face. I was so surprised by the sudden turn of events that I forgot myself and moved my arm too quick which sent him right back to work mode and almost got my arm torn off, lol.

    The poor handler is starting to think its a lost cause, and a lot of the guys don't help by being scared of the dog and shying away whenever he's around. Their tension adds to the dog's tension and it just snowballs from there. Any suggestions from the brain trust?
     
  2. StarfoxHowl

    StarfoxHowl

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    I will assume that shooting the dog is off the table as a viable solution.
     

  3. silverado_mick

    silverado_mick

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    I think my chief would take issue with offing a 10,000+ investment, so yeah, thats a no-go. :supergrin:
     
  4. JTipper.45

    JTipper.45

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    We had the same problem years ago. One of the guys in our small dept got a Belgian. Everyone was a little intimidated by the Maligator but one poor guy was terrified. If the dog walked by he would literaly start shaking. The dog would key in on this right away Fear affects our nervouse system ad adds a little different scent to our perspiration. This is what tracking dogs key in on I would start on reducing everyones fear. Have him kennel the dog in the station somewhere all the guys congrigate. Let him start getting used to their scent. If he is a bite dog use someone other than the road guys during bite training. When he breaks him, let some of the guys be around. A dog is the happiest when he has been crosslegged in the kennel for a few hours waiting to go potty and you let him out. After a while of spending time with the guys our dog got to where he was able to roam the station with no worries. Oh, except for the one guy who was terrified. The dog would litteraly track him down, sit by him, and stare him down the whole time!
     
  5. Kadetklapp

    Kadetklapp Methberry PD

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    Maligator! :rofl::rofl:
     
  6. Hack

    Hack Crazy CO Gold Member

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    Somehow I see a comedy movie coming out.:whistling:


    Not a K-9 guy, although I wish I was. BOP is real odd about that kind of thing.
     
  7. Philly K-9

    Philly K-9 Run! I Dare ya!

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    I've seen a few dogs like this. We had one, King, a large GSD, who no one could get near. What you need to realize is that the dog is a tool not a pet or a mascot. A lot of cops want to play with the K9's and that's great if the dog is social. If not, that's ok too. Just be sure to follow the handler's instructions and NEVER come between the dog and the bad guy and NEVER, NEVER, NEVER come between the dog and his handler! You'd be amazed how many cops have made those mistakes with my old dog on the street! Let's just say I got lucky and leave it at that.

    Look, having a dog that's "on" when around cops is not all that bad. It can be a pain in the butt but it's not the end of the world.

    If the handler has a problem with the dog being "on" around fellow cops he has some options.

    1) Keep the dog away from other cops. Keep him in a kennel or his car when at the station. Train the cops how to work around and with his dog. I can't suggest how beause every dog is different.

    2) Building on the advice above about getting the cops over the fear of the dog, suggest to the handler that he allow the cops to play tug with his K9. Have him teach you the correct way to play with his dog so you don't get hurt and then allow you to play tug. Slowly and short at first. Build on it. Also, small dog treats may be an option.

    3) Limit training to K9 staff if possible. The dog will associate you guys with bite work and make the problem worse.

    4) Sugest to the handler that he use a command phrase to let the dog know that the person that's comming toward him is a good guy. The word "OK" works well. Have the handler start using that command, "OK" every time the dog interacts with other people. Friends, Wife, kids, etc. For example, LADY; "Officer, may I pet your dog?" HANDLER; "Sure, one second. "Brando", it's OK." If done every time, the dog begins to "power down" so to speak and accept strangers. He should still be a tad on guard. He's still a police dog after all.

    Look, all of that being said, "Brando" might just be one of those dogs that's "on" all the time. Some Mals are like that. As I said, he's a tool not a pet.

    Good luck. PM me if you'd like to talk on the phone.
    :wavey:
     
  8. PROSOUTH

    PROSOUTH

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    Back when I was working dogs we would always take an item of clothing , usually a T-shirt that had been worn and was loaded with scent, from each officer on the crew and put in the K-9's cage when he began his new job. This will associate the dog with all of his new co-workers.

    When my K-9 MAXX contracted heartworms the Vet called me and said that he was going nuts and that the arsenic would kill him if he didn't settle down. I had not seen him in two days, so I went to the office and talked to the Vet and told him he was missing me and hadn't been away from me so he was upset. I was in my POV and had an old fatigue shirt I used for a light jacket behind the seat of my truck that I took into the Vet. I instructed him to take it into the back and put it in Maxx's cage. The vet returned and said he had never seen that one before, He said Maxx sniffed the item and turned around twice and laid down on the shirt calm as heck. I told him he knew I would be back for him and the shirt and the scent off the shirt was re-assuring to him. The procedure went OK and I picked him up at the end of the week.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2010
  9. Kadetklapp

    Kadetklapp Methberry PD

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    Very cool. My GSD is a heartworm survivor as well. :wavey:
     
  10. mikegun

    mikegun

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    Having had a k9 most of my cop years, pHILLY, MAKES A VERY GOOD POINT, The dog is a tool, and i think we tend to forget that at times, re read his post very good advice..IMHO
     
  11. silverado_mick

    silverado_mick

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    Hey man thanks a lot for the advice. Like I said, new dog and new handler, so I'm just looking to help him out and ease his mind a little as far as the pooch is concerned. If I get more specific questions for you, stand by for a PM, but I'm gonna take your advice and make some suggestions.

    No no no...that's not the case at all. We all KNOW he's a tool and treat him accordingly. When he tried to bite me the other nite I apologized to the handler for spooking his dog and he said "nah it wasn't you, he's just a dick". My response was "all things considered I'd rather he be a dick than a *****".

    He's got the best nose I've ever seen on a GSD, and a ridiculously hard bite so I'm told. He's already made an impact on the street and has a couple of dope finds and one good 1 1/2 mile track on a burglary suspect through snow and freezing cold that ended in an arrest. If it comes to leaving him in the car (which is the current solution) then that's the way it will be, but the handler being new wants his dog to be "part of the family" so to speak. Just trying to get some tips to facilitate is all.

    Thanks for the advice guys.
     
  12. lawman800

    lawman800 Juris Glocktor

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    It just keeps getting better, don't it?
    Yeah, a dog like that you don't eat all at once.:supergrin:
     
  13. silverado_mick

    silverado_mick

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    :rofl:

    Right, you gotta let him marinate for awhile first...