I need some ground up Linux help.

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Blaster, Sep 26, 2007.

  1. Blaster

    Blaster Hunc tu caveto

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    I came across a spare computer and would like to experiment with Linux. The box is a HP 8000 workstation with dual processors and 4 gig of ram. It was kind of a high end device a few years ago it has a graphics card that supports dual monitors. A buddy passed it on to me.

    I would like to get it up and running with a Linux operating system. Can I do this by downloading to another computer and burning a CD?

    Anything that will get me away from the evil Microsoft would be great. Then I can experiment and learn.
     
  2. prism

    prism more ammo

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  3. bouncethis

    bouncethis

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    Download ubuntu linux, it is the most robust , easy to use and feature rich linux distrobution.
     
  4. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    Whats the proc. speed and hard drive space available on that PC? With that much ram, you should be able to use any distro you want. Also, what video chipset. ATI, while it *usually* works fine with the default drivers, can be a pain sometimes. If you have Nvidia, its really the best you can get. How will this PC get on the internet, assuming you want it on the internet. If wireless, what is the wireless card. If Dial up, what sort of modem.

    I probably wouldn't use a distro like Puppy/Damn Small, as it is a fairly minimal install, because its meant for PC's with very little resources. Great distros, but probably not the best choice for you, unless you're just dying to learn to compile from source, etc.

    Distros that will be pretty easy to pick up and get working fairly quickly: Any of the *buntus(Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu), LinuxMint(which is more or less Ubuntu), PCLinuxOS. For a flat out newbie, I'd recommend either Ubuntu or LinuxMint. Mint will basically have all the benefits of Ubuntu, but all multimedia codecs, DVD playback, etc, will be installed out of the box. Other distros, this will require a bit of hoop jumping. I'm not a fan of PCLinux at all, but the newest version, while I hate it, seems to get rave reviews, its just always slow on my PC/Laptop.

    Medium: Debian, Sidux, and Sabayon. I really like Debian and Sidux, but they aren't as forgiving as the ones I mentioned above. Both are Debian based, which means they'll be similar to the *buntus and Mint, but generally there's not quite as much hand holding with these. Sabayon is a bit complex, but it is pre-installed with a boatload of software, and all the "eye candy", and generally works well.

    All of these distributions are live CD's, but Debian's live CD has always sucked for me, but it installs perfectly with the Network install. A Live CD basically means you can boot the CD you burn, and run the OS from the disk without making changes to your computer. Test hardware, surf the internet, etc. If you don't like it, you simply reboot, and remove the CD from the drive, and your back at Windows.

    Hard: I'd avoid these until you get some more experience, unless you're just dying to see how many patches of hair you can rip out. ;) Slackware, Gentoo, Zenwalk, and more than a few others. They are great distros, but its meant for the true geek, who wants to compile everything from source, build new kernels, etc. I'd stick with something in my easy list if I were you.

    Go to this link, and you can look at screenshots for all of the distributions I mentioned above.

    http://shots.osdir.com/?rfp=dta

    If you go with Ubuntu, download version 7.04 Feisty Fawn. The next version, 7.10, will be out in about 4 weeks, but I wouldn't mess with the beta. Also, don't bother downloading Version 6.06 "Long Term Support". There's been a lot of improvements between 6.06 to 7.04, and unless you're paying for support, you get no real benefit of the LTS release.

    That was way more than I intended to say, but I don't think I missed anything..lol.

    http://www.ubuntu.com
    http://www.kubuntu.org
    http://www.xubuntu.org
    http://linuxmint.com/
    http://www.pclinuxos.com/

    Any probs, feel free to PM or send me an instant message.

    IGF
     
  5. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    Couple other tips not related to the distribution you choose.

    When you download the CD/DVD image(ISO file):

    1. Burn them to CDR/DVDR. Rewriteable works sometimes, but doesn't work a lot of the time. Don't know why, but it is indeed true. I've never had a problem with DVDRs or CDRs.

    2. Burn them as an image and burn them SLOW. No need to max out Nero at 24x. I don't know why this matters, but it does, trust me. I've got about 20 dead CDRs from where I burned ISO's at 20x, and they failed to boot. Burned the same ISO, to the same type of media at 4x, and they worked perfectly.

    Just thought I'd add the above.

    IGF
     
  6. Washington D.C.

    Washington D.C.

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    Very up to date (not really needed on old PC) and stable in Sidux Linux. It's based on Debian Sid and comes on a live CD so you can try it on your hardware before installing.

    Here the link for the CD image to burn to a CD. It's 700 MB.

    http://debian.tu-bs.de/project/sidux/release/sidux-2007-03.1-200708151444-gaia-kde-full.iso


    Homepage


    http://sidux.com

    Forums

    http://sidux.com/module-PNphpBB2.html


    Documents

    http://manual.sidux.com/en/welcome-en.htm


    Debian Homepage


    http://www.debian.org

    Debian Forums

    http://forums.debian.net

    Debian Documents

    http://www.debian.org/doc/
     
  7. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    Last edited: Jan 19, 2012
  8. vanderson

    vanderson

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    Just get Kubuntu you will like it and if you have any questions just PM I am always available to help.
     
  9. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    Kubuntu is OK, I just am not a fan of KDE as its to resource heavy and slow(at least compared to Gnome and Xfce). Thats not really Kubuntu's fault, its a KDE fault, and it will likely be that way with any KDE distro. Oddly, Sidux seems to run on one of my old PCs well despite being KDE, Kubuntu will grind it to a halt. The installer crashed a couple times, etc. Its a 733mhz Pentium III, 512mb Ram, Nvidia FX5200 256mb PCI video card. Kubuntu has also had issues on my Laptop(similar to above, but 1ghz).

    Key thing to remember, is what works great for 1 person, may not work as great for another. Most likely the first distro you try, isn't going to be the one you end up using on a regular basis.

    I started with PCLinuxOS .90, distro hopped forever around between a lot of distros, before settling on Debian about a year ago. It was a LONG, LONG process before I finally found a distro that worked well, and that I liked.

    IGF
     
  10. vanderson

    vanderson

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    Never had a problem running any version of Kubuntu on any older system especially one with 512MB of ram, the limitations are 256mb if you dont know what they are.

    If not get Xubuntu but I love KDE never had a problem best thing ever for Linux.

    But it is really the users choice and thats what I tell my clients.

    ADD: Also he has 4GB of ram it wont lock up, did you read his initial post? Also it is the MOST compatible for drivers. You should try the new version if you haven't, debian is great but NOT for a desktop system in my opinion just for server
     
  11. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

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    Yes I read his first post, did you read my first one?

    My point was, I hate KDE because its top heavy compared to the other 3 Gui's. Debian works fine as a desktop, ist actually extremely similar to the *buntus...

    IGF
     
  12. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    Unless you’re doing this just to brag that you have a Leenuks box, I’d suggest you ignore the “easy to use” sales pitch. Get a real OS, roll up your sleeves and stick in your arms clean up to the elbows. ;) If you’re not tweaking it, breaking it, fixing it and learning to write scripting -– remember that ‘vi’ and Bourne shell are your best friends -– it’s just bling-bling.
     
  13. gmachine

    gmachine

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    http://distrowatch.com/

    Distro Watch is a good resource for someone interested in Linux.
    It's a good starting point to read about many of the different Linux flavors as well as links to download most of them.

    If you download and install a distro you don't like, download and install another one...