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... what if you are reseasoning them? I used an SOS pad on a pan that had a little rust, and some other spots from sitting without being used for years. I then reseasoned it and its slicker than the one I have been using. I taste no soap in my food. Also, I use lard. Whats better, lard or vegetable oil? Anyway, I may use an SOS pad on my normal use pan and reseason to see if it will slick up some.
 

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Cajunator®
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I think people are too obsessive about this. If the pan works for you, then don't worry about it.

You're doing fine.

We had iron skillets since I was too young to crawl. Us idiot kids washed them in the sink with everything else, and mom came behind us and coated them with Crisco. No one ever complained about anything that was cooked in those skillets.

Of course, if they had complained, they may have learned of the primary use a woman has for her iron skillet.
 

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I've got an old, old, old, skillet and wash it along with all the other dishes and haven't noticed anything. I cook bacon, taters and eggs on it, plus an occasional sausage in it.
 

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never heard that. whats the reasoning behind it, to keep the old flavors intact?
There's more information on this on the internet than there is on how to take care of a Glock.

The iron cookware makes excellent non-stick cookware if you take care of it correctly. If you toss it in the sink with the rest of the dishes, like we used to, it loses it's non-stick properties. They can be restored if you reseason it.

Or if you just use enough Crisco. People don't use that stuff much these days, so they have to come up with special time-consuming and costly methods to keep the food from sticking to the pan.

Notice how much less heart disease we had in this country before we learned so much about which foods are bad for our hearts?
 

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Don't use soap, cast iron is porous and the soap will work its way into the metal. The soap will also break up your seasoning oil and will take your pot/pan back to pre-seasoning state that you'll have to rework.

Use lard or other animal fat to season it, vegetable oil doesn't coat near as well. Peanut oil does work but takes longer to get it good and built up in the pores.

If your pot/pan is rusting you have either left water in it for more than a few minutes or you have washed the seasoning out of the thing. You need to re-season it after taking steel wool to the rust spots.
 

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Don't use the eye bolt because the load is too heavy.
 

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... what if you are reseasoning them? I used an SOS pad on a pan that had a little rust, and some other spots from sitting without being used for years. I then reseasoned it and its slicker than the one I have been using. I taste no soap in my food. Also, I use lard. Whats better, lard or vegetable oil? Anyway, I may use an SOS pad on my normal use pan and reseason to see if it will slick up some.
If you want to go back to a raw pan, throw it upside down in a hot fire on the coals, this will cook all the old seasoning out and take it back to just the cast. Then you can season it with lard or crisco.
 

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I wash mine with ordinary dish washing liquid, just like my other dishes.

Just don't go crazy on it and everything will be alright.
 

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If you cannot use soap, how do you clean it. Especially the baked on crusty stuff.
I use hot water and a plastic wool scour pad. It looks like a large-grained SOS, but its made of plastic. If the stuck on stuff is on there hard, I scrub it with kosher salt.

After cleaning, the pan is always dried, put on heat until hot, and then rubbed with oil, crisco, bacon grease, or lard.
 

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If you cannot use soap, how do you clean it. Especially the baked on crusty stuff.
Most of the "crusty stuff" just flakes off my pans. I can pop it off with my finger or run a dry brush over it. It's the gooey stuff that's a little harder. Even that, i just run hot water over it and scrub with a stiff bristle brush until it's clean. That's the point of cast iron. Nothing sticks to a properly seasoned pan.
 

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If you cannot use soap, how do you clean it. Especially the baked on crusty stuff.
Hot water and green pad. Sea salt for an abrasive.
 

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AKA Fluffy316
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I think lard works best in a Iron Skillet.

My grandma used to make Cornbread in an iron skillet and then slice it up like pie. My mom got my grandma's iron cookware, so she let me have one of the skillets. I think this pan has to be at least 80 years old.

No store bought pan can compare with an old Iron Skillet that was properly cared for.
 

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Salt as a scrubber we have a winner!
 

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Miembro Antiguo
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I think people are too obsessive about this. If the pan works for you, then don't worry about it.

You're doing fine.

We had iron skillets since I was too young to crawl. Us idiot kids washed them in the sink with everything else, and mom came behind us and coated them with Crisco. No one ever complained about anything that was cooked in those skillets.

Of course, if they had complained, they may have learned of the primary use a woman has for her iron skillet.

This is exactly it. The principal advantage of a cast iron skillet is the mass. It offers a uniform, even surface temperature that thin skillets cannot match. While I don't make a habit of washing mine, it won't hurt them. Just lube them up well before the next usage.
 
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