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If you have Remington STS or Nitro hulls they load great once the press is set up for them.
Remington Gun Clubs will also load great at those same settings, but Gun Clubs are notorious for having different length hulls. You’ll see the occasional swirl or hole in the crimp.
My 650 is set to the sweet spot and I can load 1oz in Remington or Winchester and all I have to do is change the powder bushing for the smaller volume AA or I’ll get the occasional wrinkle in a Winchester hull

If you are reloading Winchester be careful off older hulls. They change them in the 1990’s and the loading is different.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
If you have Remington STS or Nitro hulls they load great once the press is set up for them.
Remington Gun Clubs will also load great at those same settings, but Gun Clubs are notorious for having different length hulls. You’ll see the occasional swirl or hole in the crimp.
My 650 is set to the sweet spot and I can load 1oz in Remington or Winchester and all I have to do is change the powder bushing for the smaller volume AA or I’ll get the occasional wrinkle in a Winchester hull

If you are reloading Winchester be careful off older hulls. They change them in the 1990’s and the loading is different.
Really good info. How can one detect older AA hulls?
 

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Go to Walmart and get an aluminum cookie sheet tray that has a raised lip all the way around the tray. Mount the press in the center of the tray. When you spill shot and power it helps in containing the shot from going everywhere. Also a hand held vacuum helps in picking up the said shot and powder.

Also pick up two like the large plastic Akro bins but are bigger for your hulls and wads
I used to spill shot and powder, and thought about remounting with a cookie sheet.

After a while, I seem to spill a lot less stuff. I just mounted it on a board (with a redding powder measure on the backside for individual loading of pistol/rifle).

Remington STS's work just fine, but I pretty much stick to Winchester AA's. I've got two (2) flip top bins full of them, and about 2k loaded. I'm pretty much set on hulls for the foreseeable future. Virgin shot has gotten expensive though. I've probably got 100# of reclaimed and virgin.
 
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Really good info. How can one detect older AA hulls?
Winchester added a "step" at the bottom of the hull. AA hull on the left and the "new" HS (High Strength) on the right.


 

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Flyover nailed it
A lot of people don’t like the new AA HS because of the change. I like them, they load easy. You just have to know to look. I recently came across some old ones freshly shot. The red is deeper red, somewhere between lighter red of the new ones and the maroon of a Federal Hull.
 

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Flyover nailed it
A lot of people don’t like the new AA HS because of the change. I like them, they load easy. You just have to know to look. I recently came across some old ones freshly shot. The red is deeper red, somewhere between lighter red of the new ones and the maroon of a Federal Hull.
I haven't run across any of the "new" AA HS hulls yet. From what I have heard is that you need to find loads specifically designed for the HS hull. I have seen a few loads in one of BPI's manuals.
 

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With the old ones I found At the Trap Range I think some kid got into grandpa’s closet and shot all he had.
The new AA HS have been around for awhile. I rarely see any of the old ones anymore.
And the recipes are different because there is less volume in the new ones.
I like the new ones, they load fine for me. They just have a different construction.
 

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The machines that make the hulls are special and as Winchester’s machines wore out they knew they had to do something different. Because the European companies were flooding the market with their cheap straight offerings.
They had their engineers design all new machines and production methods to make a straight walled hull with an insert that would make it a tapered wall hull.
This made them competitive again, the hull had teething pain, but Winchester fixes those a long time ago. They are really good hulls.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
The machines that make the hulls are special and as Winchester’s machines wore out they knew they had to do something different. Because the European companies were flooding the market with their cheap straight offerings.
They had their engineers design all new machines and production methods to make a straight walled hull with an insert that would make it a tapered wall hull.
This made them competitive again, the hull had teething pain, but Winchester fixes those a long time ago. They are really good hulls.
That's interesting since I have a relative that's going to gift me a box of old AA hulls, wads, and PRIMERS! I'll have to study further the loading nuances for both. Is it a matter of wad and powder selection, or are there crimp adjustments between old and new?
 

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A couple of years ago I picked up a couple cases of Winchester 28 Ga ammo, it is AA construction. Maybe they hadn't made the change over in the 28 Ga yet.
 

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I can’t speak from experience since I’ve never loaded the old AA’s. But they were the Gold Standard for many years. They can be reloaded many, many times over.
I’m not sure if there is a wad difference. I do know that reloading books said they loaded the same as the new ones, but that’s not true.
When I get back home I’ll look up some resources.
Trapshooters.com is a wealth of resourse. But beware they drop the Ban Hammer for the slightest offense. If you had members selling $6,000 to $10,000 guns to each other you would be strict too. It’s a club but you sound ******* enough to get along over there.
 

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I love reloading shotshell. It’s not as precise as metallic so it’s got some fudge room, but stack height can be a real pain in the neck.
You have to stick with recipes, you cannot substitute primers, powders, wads or hulls.
 

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Go to Walmart and get an aluminum cookie sheet tray that has a raised lip all the way around the tray. Mount the press in the center of the tray. When you spill shot and power it helps in containing the shot from going everywhere. Also a hand held vacuum helps in picking up the said shot and powder.

Also pick up two like the large plastic Akro bins but are bigger for your hulls and wads

What he said...happens to the best of us
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Well this thing has grown legs. A relative that heard I bought a press showed up today. He no longer had use for his shotshell gear so he dug it all out. After a few trips back and forth from his car I now have:

Thousands of hulls, mostly AA one piece.

Many thousands of wads of various types.
2700 primers.

And another press! He gifted me a 12 gauge Sizemaster.

He apologized for forgetting to bring all the shot too, so I'll have that coming.

Since I've been reading and re-reading the Lyman Shotshell manual #5, it was also kind of cool to see that he brought volumes 1 and 2. A few sleeves of the primers are the old CCI 157 size. He has the right hulls and wads for those too, plus the old manuals have data for the 157s.

I should have hands on the replacement part that I broke this week, so I should be making ammo this weekend. I need to get some bins to start organizing all this bounty!
 

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I've reloaded with MEC 600 Jr's, 9000 Hydraulic, and Grabbers. The Jr's are foolproof, but very slow, the Hydraulics' are blazing fast, but when there is a screwup it creates a massive mess. Have settled on a Grabber which is the same as a 9000 except you have to rotate the shell plate manually. It's a similar philosophy as a Dillon RL 500 in that you have manual control over advancing through the cycle. I originally loaded for trap, but the price of shot doubled and it was simpler to buy loaded shells through my club as reloading was saving <$1.00 a box. Started shooting Cowboy Action and went back to reloading so I could make very-very lite shells. Recently started reloading for trap due to a pending trap shell shortage. Following are my thoughts on the subject:

The weakest link on MEC progressives is their primer drop. Always watch the drop like a Hawk and make sure that the primer is correctly aligned. A cookie sheet under the press is a good idea. My Grabber is mounted to a large board which I fasten to my workbench with bolts/wing nuts and take off when done with a batch of shells. Make sure that the latch which keeps the powder bar in the left position when starting out is always perfectly adjusted. This is the main dropped shot culprit and can drive you nuts.

Stick to one specific shell, either a Win. AA or a Remington STS/Nitro. Both have brass heads. The major difference is the Remington's are a few thousands longer than the Winchesters. Moving between the two causes adjustment issues which is a pain. Just stick with one or the other. Use only approved powder manufacturers recipes. Finally, there are tons of YouTubes. Watch the MEC YouTubes first. They are dry and presented by engineers who always refer to every part number (screw part 1234, spring 9876, etc.) but are very well done. They cover every situation.

The 9000 is a first-rate workhorse and makes excellent shells. If you run into issues MEC has wonderful phone support; enjoy.
 
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