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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
CED7000

Without a place to shoot for a little while more I’ve just been testing it out.

I “can” get it to work with Dry Fire, but I have to qualify that statement with it only works with my hammer fired semi autos (not my revolvers), AND I put Velcro on the back and attached it to an athletic wrist support (support hand) so the Mic is right next to the hammer.

That all sounds silly, but it’s not that bad.

I’ve been working on my first shot for the GSSF course of fire (from the low ready). A revelation I’ve had is that I lose 0.2-0.5 seconds if when I bring the gun up I have to hunt for the front sight. It’s just a slight nuance I never noticed dry firing without a timer. Nor would I ever be able to quantify it without one. One time I might get 1.00, and then another I’d get 1.30 and have to ask myself WHY. Without the timer I never knew that was a question I had to ask myself.

It’s caused me to pay more attention to my starting position, wrists, and where my head actually is relative to my shooting arm, and ALL before I even would give my ready signal an RSO.

There are 12 (12/81 shots) from the low ready position shots in a GSSF course of fire, and that can cost me 5 to 6 seconds without having even fired a shot. That’s even MORE of an impact with the shorter courses of fire with the Pocket Glock and Major Subcompact Divisions (12/54 shots).

I’ve also been able to measure my RAW reaction time. Gun pointed at the target, finger ON the trigger once I hear the BEEP, CLICK!!!!!!!!! 0.15-0.20 seconds it takes me to react to an audible beep. That’s two seconds over the course of fire wasted standing around before I even react after the beep.

This additional discipline to my practice is all new to me. What little I’ve done in the last few days is eye opening.
 

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I'd like one of them. My timer is big and bulky. I don't shoot enough anymore to buy one.
 

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I think there are free apps for that. Probably not as good as the real thing but should work for practice/training.
 
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This is not a proper substitute for a real timer but I use a dry fire par timer app on my phone for better-than-nothing practice, mainly getting my duty pistol out of a Safariland ALS/SLS holster and on target dry firing.

The app I use does a beep to start and then you can set it to beep again at an interval that you choose. So it's only as precise as you setting your goal time and measuring yourself.
 

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apps are not timers, and timers are not apps. So just spend the $100 and get on with training. I have a CED 7000, a Competition Electronics Pocket Pro 2 and an old RUREADY. Other guys like the PACT Club III.

For dry fire, use a par time.
 

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We've run into that "problem" at my club. At a recent fun shoot, one guy was using a suppressed AR style gun (I forget exactly the model). He has all the paperwork to legally own it in Connecticut.

The RO had issues with timing his shooting, because the suppressor worked so well the timer wasn't recording correctly (I don't know the model of timer). We just resorted to "manual" timing with a couple guys timing his shooting. It was fun and cool to see him using the suppressed gun, but we all agreed that until we can figure something out it really doesn't work well in timed matches.

What is "par time"? Using a timer manually?
 

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It took me a while, but I finally bought one about 1.5 years ago (for Christmas). My 12yo daughter isn’t gung-ho about shooting until the timer comes out. She’s all about the competition - she’s always trying to beat me at whatever we’re doing, not just shooting.

It comes in handy a few times a year when I get together with some friends at a private range. We do all kinds of shooting, including 2 or 3 IDPA stages. Nothing fancy, maybe 6 or so targets with some no shoots, requiring reloads and movement.

I used to use a phone app but that was clumsy and unreliable.
 

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We've run into that "problem" at my club. At a recent fun shoot, one guy was using a suppressed AR style gun (I forget exactly the model). He has all the paperwork to legally own it in Connecticut.

The RO had issues with timing his shooting, because the suppressor worked so well the timer wasn't recording correctly (I don't know the model of timer). We just resorted to "manual" timing with a couple guys timing his shooting. It was fun and cool to see him using the suppressed gun, but we all agreed that until we can figure something out it really doesn't work well in timed matches.

What is "par time"? Using a timer manually?
I think a par timer is a timer with 2 beeps. One tells you to start and the other beep is at your par time. If you hear the second beep before you pull the trigger, you know you’re over par.
 

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If you are timing a suppressed AR, you have to hold the timer close to the bolt, not the muzzle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I wouldn't worry about your reaction time if you are doing .15-.20. There is a limit to human reaction time. Olympic sprinters average .162.

Now your time to first shot, that's different. Definitely measure and work on that.
Agreed, I really don't know if there is even a way to improve my reaction time. I'm almost 50. It's not going to get any better.

I finally got to play with this at the range last night. I think even worse than my first shot, is my transition time to a new target. My follow up shot (second shot on same target) is 0.5-0.6, don't know if that's any good (I did have some 0.3
s in there, but they were luck, I didn't have control of the front sight), but my transition time is around 0.8 which is not much of an improvement from the low ready and getting sight acquisition on the first target. I have to think there is a lot of improvement in there.

Transition shots make up more than HALF the GSSF course of fire.

Anyway........... this timer is great. I now can break down every aspect of every movement that cumulatively comprises the final score, and focus on where I am specifically the weakest.

It's only one night of data. I've got a ways to go.
 

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Depends what distance. .5 for a -0 shot at 20 yards isn't too bad, given the accuracy requirements of GSSF matches, but for a 7 yard shot that is quite slow. Those transitions are definitely slow though. Be sure to move your eyes ahead of the gun, not follow the gun to the next target like a tank turret.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Depends what distance. .5 for a -0 shot at 20 yards isn't too bad, given the accuracy requirements of GSSF matches, but for a 7 yard shot that is quite slow. Those transitions are definitely slow though. Be sure to move your eyes ahead of the gun, not follow the gun to the next target like a tank turret.
Yea, when I got home, and compared my times to my ACTUAL match times it translated into being SLOWER than I am at matches. But I was only practicing at 25 yards (I didn't have the range to myself, and I had to pick ONE distance)

**********

Ideally, I can get my hands on my range's 8 inch single standing plates, and put them out at 10, 15, 20, 25, etc... and see where my "limit" is in regard to two hits per plate with transitions.
 

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All competitition timers have sensitivity adjustments. I find that MOST ROs have no idea whatsoever how to adjust that sensitivity - GSSF ROs especially. Most of those ROs believe you have to stagger COF shooting when 2 or 3 are shooting on the same bay; absolutely NOT required. Drop the sensitivity to 6 on the PP II and keep the timer up and pointed at the gun - not up in the sky, not down at your toes, not at the other COFs. By the same token, timer sensitivity may be raised to 'hear' suppressed guns or. 22 rifles. But then that higher sensitivity raises problems of its own.

I also have a CED7000, but never could hear the beep routinely with those. It IS NOT the volume of the beep - it is the frequency of the beep. I have a noise-induced (notch) hearing loss, and the freq of the 7000 matches that notch. I bought my particular 7000 as it can be used with a strobe/buzzer unit that straps on my arm, and strobes/buzzes concurrently with the beep.

Practiscore timers at SCSA 'look' like the 7000, but I can hear those... thankfully.

Timer Apps are an absolute joke for me. Rarely hear my phone ring or jingle at all, unless I am right next to it. Certainly not going to hear it on a range, with muffs.
 

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...What is "par time"? Using a timer manually?
I think a par timer is a timer with 2 beeps. One tells you to start and the other beep is at your par time. If you hear the second beep before you pull the trigger, you know you’re over par.
A par time may be set on any competition timer and is the time between the 2 set beeps. For instance, GSSF Indoor uses a 15 second par time for every string, in which you must fire 10 shots (or 5 shots in Pocket Glock division.)

Think of par time as par in golf. Where a hole may be a par 5, a string may be a par 15 (seconds). Set par to 2 seconds tp get out of the holster and on target with your shot before the second beep.
 
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