How to practice FTE?

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by jensen_lover, Jan 31, 2010.

  1. jensen_lover

    jensen_lover

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    I went to the range with my conversion barrel on Saturday. I had two FTE where the next round was trying to go into the chamber while the spent round was still in. The terrible Monarch ammo I used was surely the culprit. How do you practice FTE? Do you use weak ammo that you know will not properly eject? If you want to try that look into Monarch from Academy.
     
  2. Cole125

    Cole125 Silver Member

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    How I practice FTE is I load a couple of these in each magazine: [​IMG]

    Only way to practice FTE on a Glock. :supergrin:
     

  3. Steel Head

    Steel Head Tactical Cat

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    Dump mag and hard cycle slide to clear chamber,insert mag,rack slide,BANG,BANG,BANG
     
  4. College_EMT

    College_EMT Guest

  5. TrooperBrian

    TrooperBrian

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    If you didn't want to do it midstring, you could just induce a doublefeed and run a doublefeed drill. It would be the same as the AR-15 drill, but easier. Lock the slide back, rip the mag out, rack rack rack, new mag, rack bang.
     
  6. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

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    What you're describing is a type of FTE most commonly referred to as a "double feed" or a "type 3 malfunction". It occurs when a loaded round or fired case is in the chamber and a round is trying to feed in behind it. The proper way to clear it is:

    1) Lock the slide back
    2) Rip out the magazine
    3) Cycle the slide 3 times
    4) Insert a new magazine if you have one, or the old magazine if you don't have a new one
    5) Cycle the slide
    6) Assess, and fire if necessary

    You can replicate it and practice clearing it on your own time by dropping a dummy round into the chamber with the slide locked back, inserting a magazine with a dummy round in it, and then releasing the slide so the dummy round in the mag is trying to feed into an already occupied chamber. Lock, rip, rack-rack-rack, reload. Easy!
     
  7. rfd339

    rfd339

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    When me and my wife go to the range we will load each others mags with 1 or 2 (snap caps) for malfunction drills. The cheap way is to use spent casings also . We used that way in training where I use to work and had no problems with that either. My way of clearing a misfire is a modified SPORTS .

    MAKING SURE WEAPON IS POINTED IN SAFE DIRECTION.

    Slap mag to make sure it is seated in place.
    Pull the slide back to eject or clear malfunction.
    Observer to make sure chamber is clear of malfunction.
    Release slide cambering next round
    Take aim on target
    Squeeze trigger.
     
  8. mechanica

    mechanica Texazonan.

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  9. jensen_lover

    jensen_lover

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    Thanks guy. I think I will load a few spent casings into my mag. That guy nearly shoots his hand off on the second or third shot. Pretty good way to practice if you do not mind losing a finger.
     
  10. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

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    You're right that using live ammo for clearance drills is unnecessary and can be risky. Still, I would advise spending the money to get some dummy rounds. Empty cases do not feed and clear the same way live rounds do, but dummy rounds will. It's worth the $10 to get a handfull, and the good ones last nearly forever.