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Chico its kind of nice reading the long report because same state and we had our weird twists and turns. Shotguns to Marlin Camp 9s to MP5/10MM, to ARS. And ARs had a long a winding road to include chopped and converted that looked like a monkey did it. I was so glad SWAT was so uptight about their rifles being out of service for 20 minutes that I didn't even argue with that boss.

Handguns? Paras got approved with their LDA models for one guy who then discovered their QC was not up to par and it never got past approval. Our retarded long qualification at that time would choke any gun.
 

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Until 2002, the standard LAPD pistol was the Beretta 92F. When William Bratton was appointed chief, he allowed officers to also carry the Glock. New officers are now issued the Glock 22 in .40 S&W.

But once on the street, officers have a variety of choices and can choose the Beretta 92F, 92FS or 8045; the S&W 459, 5904, 5903, 659, 5906, 645, 4506, 4566, 4567, 5903 TSW, 5906 TSW, 4569 TSW and 4566 TSW; and the Glock 17, G19, G22, G23, G34 and G35.

For LAPD SWAT, Kimber designed and designated the Custom TLE II, a 5-inch-barreled 1911 in .45 ACP
Man I would love to carry my Beretta 92. It would be my first choice if I was allowed to pick my own duty weapon.

Everyone else in the agency can carry practically whatever they want, but us Neanderthals in patrol are required to carry the issued Glock 17.

I didn’t mind carrying the issued P226 in .40 at all, but Glock.......bleh! Not my preference.
 

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Man I would love to carry my Beretta 92. It would be my first choice if I was allowed to pick my own duty weapon.

Everyone else in the agency can carry practically whatever they want, but us Neanderthals in patrol are required to carry the issued Glock 17.

I didn’t mind carrying the issued P226 in .40 at all, but Glock.......bleh! Not my preference.
I never understood departments that said patrol shall carry A but everyone else can carry B, C ,D, E, etc.
 
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I never understood departments that said patrol shall carry A but everyone else can carry B, C ,D, E, etc.
But but but........you can share magazines because that has saved hundreds of cops lives over the years.

BS.

I cannot find a single instance of officers sharing magazines in any gunfight, ever.

Not even during the North Hollywood bank robbery shootout, one of the longest, highest round counts, and most involved officers in law enforcement history, is there any mention of officers sharing magazines.

Truth is the idiots That lead our department didn’t realize that the P229 and P226 don’t share magazines. The chiefs jaw dropped when I demonstrated that years ago when protesting the mandated issue gun.

And now they issue a G17 or G19 and those mags only share one way. So it’s a moot point to begin with.

Atleast we can carry almost anything we want as backup guns. Only requirements are .380 caliber or greater and “reputable manufacturer”.

I can’t tolerate agencies that don’t allow backup guns.
 

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I never understood departments that said patrol shall carry A but everyone else can carry B, C ,D, E, etc.
It makes sense to me, and we have a slight variant of it. It’s not actually “patrol,” but our policy dictates that anyone working on duty in uniform shall carry a “full size duty weapon” such as a Glock 17, M&P full size, etc. Those who work in plainclothes, and detectives can carry a compact weapon such as a Glock 26, or Glock 30. This is to prevent the clowns from wearing Glock 26’s or Glock 43s in uniform for duty use, because I know certain clowns would try it.
 

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Just about the time you think you've managed to acquire a complete list of everything issued, whether general or specialized duty, optionally authorized and approved for off-duty use ... you discover something you never knew existed, or some little circulated memo about some special enforcement/duty approval, etc. BTDT. ;)

Then, of course, someone comes along and changes things.
 

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Chico its kind of nice reading the long report because same state and we had our weird twists and turns. Shotguns to Marlin Camp 9s to MP5/10MM, to ARS. And ARs had a long a winding road to include chopped and converted that looked like a monkey did it. I was so glad SWAT was so uptight about their rifles being out of service for 20 minutes that I didn't even argue with that boss.

Handguns? Paras got approved with their LDA models for one guy who then discovered their QC was not up to par and it never got past approval. Our retarded long qualification at that time would choke any gun.
Were the ARs chopped by the volunteer fireman who works at a garage gun shop?
 

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We were given a wide choice of firearms: any Glock 17 Gen 4 with or without a tac light. Admin always gave as a top reason that in a gunfight, you could share magazine.

Wrong! If you missed with your 52 rounds, I’m not giving up my precious ammo for you to waste too.
 

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We were given a wide choice of firearms: any Glock 17 Gen 4 with or without a tac light. Admin always gave as a top reason that in a gunfight, you could share magazine.

Wrong! If you missed with your 52 rounds, I’m not giving up my precious ammo for you to waste too.
Yeah, we had that "shared ammo" idea trotted out and run around a time or two, as well. Managed to address it and eliminate the concerns after the first round of "everyone has to use the same caliber" in trhe days immediately following our transition from revolvers to pistols. Went from 1 caliber to 2 calibers, and then from 2 calibers to 3 calibers (present).

Not only did all of the training staff express a reluctance (NOT happening) to ever share ammo with someone who had ineffectually used and exhausted their own at some hypothetical OIS incident, but finding examples of OIS incidents where it had occurred, let alone saved the life of someone, was a difficult task.

It seemed easier to look back in service revolver days, when cops only carried 12-18 rounds, to find instances where sharing ammo might be found. Interestingly enough, not so much even in the earlier days of some service pistols that used 7-9rd magazines (1911's & M39's).

Trainers, as a group, seem more likely to wish to promote increased firearms training and emphasis on marksmanship, than just thinking cops are going to be sharing and swapping magazines around during some OIS.

If someone is going to be wasting their ammo loadout on sending out a lengthy stream of missed shots - which ARE going to hit something, or someone, somewhere downrange - why give them more opportunity to increase the likelihood of an even greater number of unintended things/people being hit?
 
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