How often do you train?

Discussion in 'Carry Issues' started by RPK Clone, Jul 16, 2019.

  1. I take a firearms class once a year

    1 vote(s)
    1.5%
  2. I take classes multiple times per year

    8 vote(s)
    11.8%
  3. I shoot weekly at the range

    34 vote(s)
    50.0%
  4. I shoot monthly at the range

    17 vote(s)
    25.0%
  5. Im not even sure if my nightstand gun is loaded

    8 vote(s)
    11.8%
  1. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Oh believe me, plenty of Novice shooters in IDPA, including LEO. I am training with one right now. He works LASO, he is ranked MM, which is one step above novice.
     
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  2. Orive 8

    Orive 8

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    But what if when you shoot at the range, your shooting partner and you are both instructors and have the knowledge and skill to instruct/coach/correct each other. Can the practice then be considered training?
     

  3. ExecutiveWill

    ExecutiveWill

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    I try to take at least 2-3 classes a year from reputable instructors, and I shoot once a week at the range on average. I try to dry fire at least 4-5 times a week.

    I came from a martial art background though, and I just enjoy training.
    (Though it’s expensive. I set aside a literal gun fund for my training)
     
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  4. Sdasaro

    Sdasaro Not from my cold dead clutching hands

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    The bride and I are good for 2 one hour range days a month. No formal training since I retired 100 yrs ago.
     
  5. FireForged

    FireForged Millenium #3936 Millennium Member

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    I train quarterly... training encompasses at least several force on force sessions which also includes weapon retention modules + approximately 300 rounds static range time and I typically knock the rust off of my carbine skills with 150 rounds @ 50-300 yards. Once a year or at least every other year, I will seek some manner of fighting pistol or other tactical method class.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2019
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  6. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Depends on what you are doing. If I am shooting drills, I am practicing my gun skills. If I am working on something new, like vehicle tactics, I am training. It all may well be semantics, but static drills, not training just working gun skills. Idpa, not training just working gun skills.
     
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  7. Mr Meeseeks

    Mr Meeseeks

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    I was making progress with micro drills 3 times a week and dryfire 4 or 5 days a week, last year. Now all I do is work; too tired to expend the mental energy required for productive practice.

    So basically I go and screw around on my range about once a week. Maybe 5 minutes of practice draws from cocnealment every now and then :(
     
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  8. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    I'm my own personal instructor :)

    I'm one of the GT home range club. Get to do whatever I want on my own range, 0 to 100 yards.

    Plus I belong to a 0 to 300 yard private range close by. Small membership, usually the range to myself there, too. No rules, as in no limits on how, what, or how fast.

    Also a member of a different club with an indoor pistol range.

    And have access to a private 1000 yard range.

    So, I have a variety if opportunities to shoot, and usually do so a couple times a week :)
     
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  9. Intolerant

    Intolerant

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    Sometimes, its not bad living here in upstate NY. Does have some perks, IF, you have some property. I have a couple different ranges on my property here in upstate NY. I have a couple pistol ranges, and a 200yd rifle range and an indoor 6 bay pistol range for wintertime fun. I`m also a member of the pistol & rifle club about 2 miles from my house. I go over there just to hang out and help work on club stuff just to break my retirement boredom.
     
  10. arkdweller22

    arkdweller22 Cuhootnified Roamer

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  11. Orive 8

    Orive 8

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    But for some of us, that is not new; so for us that would be practicing vehicle tactics or practicing building clearings/entries, etc...

    So again, is it only training if it is new? Because for some of us, there really isn't anything "new" after many years of training. Maybe the difference between what is labeled as training and what is labeled as practice is not that different for some.
     
  12. FireForged

    FireForged Millenium #3936 Millennium Member

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    Training is a very broad and often loose term in the English language. Its really a complete waste of time to debate semantics.

    Generally speaking, the efforts to learn, acquire and develop a new skill is called Training. The efforts to maintain that skill which are carried out in ways not previously learned, is also called Training. The efforts to maintain a skill which are carried out in a previously learned manner is called Practice.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2019
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  13. fredj338

    fredj338

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    No, reinforced previous training is still training. Doing flat range drills or shooting dots or idpa, practice. I think it is also broken down further as gun skills, practice, tactical skills, training.
     
  14. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    I agree with the first part, that it is broadly defined.

    But I think the training vs practice, in the gun community, is mainly just a matter of snootiness. "That's not training, this is training."

    I've been coaching kids in soccer, on travel teams. Started with them at 8, and now they are 14.

    Every single time, every year, if it wasn't a game day, it was called practice. In each practice, they would be introduced to and learn totally new stuff. They would also have opportunity to get better at the stuff they already new.

    The main distiction used within a practice is between a "drill" vs a "game" (not to be confused with an actual soccer game).

    In a drill, they were being asked to do something in a particular way, and to do it repetitively. A drill is mostly focused on developing and refining specific skills. For example, me asking them to receive the ball with their right foot and pass it with their left, and asking them to do it quicker, then quicker and more precise at the same time. The drill wasn't done for any particular reason at that moment, other than to develop the skill. In a soccer game, the skills are like tools in a toolbox. The better they are at the skills I think they need to have, the more options and easier time they will have in a soccer game.

    The other main part of practice is games. They can be small games, silly games, short duration, or longer bigger games. The games can be different than the actual rules of soccer, or the games can be similar to a soccer game (and then would be called a scrimmage). For an example of a silly game, it might be "knockout" inside the 18 yard box. The rules would be each player has a ball, and has to dribble it, while trying to knock out another player's ball. The last player retaining their own ball wins. Different from drills, in a game I don't care how they accomplish their objective. They use their own decision making and the skills they have and favor thus far, to try and win the little game. From my perspective, in the little games they are practicing decision making and using skills on the fly. The little game is set up in a way that I know favors some things over others, things that I believe will help them in an actual soccer game.

    So in all of that soccer stuff, what is training, what is practice? Do the words used really matter?

    In scrimmages, I may stop play and describe stategies that I think would help them. Is that part of it "training"? We just think of it as part of practice, something they know can and will happen in a scrimmage; coach yelling "stop" and then pointing things out to them, especially about positioning. Using positions is part of strategy.

    But all of it together is all called practice.

    Not to mention there is a dictionary difference between practice and practise :)
     
  15. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    OK, fair enough. But practical pistol is all about fundamentals.

    So put together some gear and lay it out where you can pick it up very easily. Let a thought come into your head during the day... like maybe the importance of attention to trigger press.

    Then at some point for 10 minutes, put on your gear. Do some draws to a dot with zero smear at the trigger press. Push that up to race pace. Then push it up to warp drive. No smear.

    Then do a few draw/reloads to the same target with no smear. Just rock solid trigger press/Burkett/rock solid trigger press.

    Use your limitations to your advantage. Go deep. Discover something.
     
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  16. Mr Meeseeks

    Mr Meeseeks

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    I like that.
     
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  17. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Even in sports, diff between training & practice. IF a bunch of kids go kick the ball around, they are practicing, kind of like shooting dot drills or flat range repetitive drills. Put a coach in there giving direction, as in a scrimmage, I would say they are training. It is a bit of semantics, but in shooting, just because you are pulling the trigger doesn't mean you are training. I think training has specific goals you work toward & generally, you are advancing your knowledge of what ever it is you are training at. Practice is developing the skills you already have, generally by taking a training class.
    SO when I train with a student shooter, I cam giving them direction on how to improve their skills. They are then going to practice what they have learned to develop their skills. Just the way I look at training vs practice. Then there is the whole training for a fight or just practicing to advance your gun skills. I do think the term training is probably over sued though.
     
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  18. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    OK, let's accept the convention that training is primarily directed outward toward the acquisition of new terrain and practice is primarily directed inward, toward the refinement of existing terrain.

    Pistol shooting is quite simple and yet extraordinarily difficult. It really only consists of a small set of skills centered around the mechanics and perception needed to place hits on targets.

    Everything else is just application. Competitive shooting adds pressure and in many cases also peripheral operations intended to distract competitors from the actual shooting. Defensive/combat shooting takes shooting skills into an applied context. But in all cases, the actual core shooting skills are paramount.

    That's where serious practice comes in. If a person is actually going to improve at shooting, it's going to come from serious, disciplined practice over an extended period of time. That's where the revelations are.

    You aren't going to get better at actual shooting by running around barricades, rolling on the ground, shooting from cars, etc. But if you make the commitment to really get good at core practical shooting, you'll have a much greater likelihood of being able to shoot well in those situations.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
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  19. Decutor

    Decutor

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    To me, the difference is A.) clear and B.) important.

    Like I said previously, most gun owners never receive coaching and instruction from a competent trainer (training).

    They merely go to the range and work on what they think they know or think they know. (Practice)

    —————

    If you don’t know what to practice, or how to practice it, you still build a skillset. It’s just that it’s probably not the right one.

    For example, you practice 1R1 a bunch, thinking it builds your draw and reload. But because you always drop the mag at the end, you train yourself to unload the gun as part of the drill, and that becomes a the way you act under stress.

    So, high quality training is important because you learn what to practice, how to practice it and why it’s important— and that is the road to building competency on real world practical skills.
     
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  20. fredj338

    fredj338

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    That is a good example of practice like you play. When we have a formal practice/training session, we run hot range. When shooting whatever drill is in play, run dry, reload & continue. End of the drill, scan, reload, scan again.