Glock 17 How often do you replace the recoil spring on a G17?

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by ccagle, May 4, 2003.

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  1. ccagle

    ccagle

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    I was curious how often you replace the recoil spring on a Glock 17. HOw often? After how many rounds?

    Thanks
     
  2. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    Wish I knew the answer. My G19 has 43K rounds on it's original spring and it's still going strong.
     

  3. ghostwn

    ghostwn Ghost Member

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    Since I never had to replace a spring before, how do you know when it's time?
     
  4. Norbert

    Norbert

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    Got a 17, it started to stovepipe after about 50K rounds, I changed the recoil spring and it is just like new again.

    I don´t know whether this "wear" is normal but it seems very acceptable to me after so much use.

    Norbi
     
  5. Razor 2-6

    Razor 2-6 Dual Cool Guy

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    yep. stove piping or incomplete chambering will be caused by a weak recoil spring. most start weaking around the 30k mark, and it will start as an inconsistant problem. it's not like it will just "quit working."

    if you're concerned about it, spend $10 and get a replacement guide rod/ spring, and keep it in your range bag. i'd bet a case of guinness that you'll meet someone who needs it before you do...
     
  6. Nightshift

    Nightshift

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    I had a friend who had purchased his father-in-law's old 17. This was a holster gun (father-in-law is LEO) since new. I don't know how many rounds went through it, but it was a lot. It had the old non-captive recoil spring.
    He started to have stovepipes with it. When I worked on his gun, the recoil spring was completely smashed down the last 1/4 part of its coils. I replaced it with a new captive spring, replaced all his drop free hi-cap mags, striker spring and trigger return spring.
    After this it was as good a new. No problems with the gun, and it felt tight like a new gun again.
    Most new stock springs are the captive type, so its not easy to see if the coils are starting to colapse. If you have a non-captive, it is recomended to compare the old spring with a new spring that has NEVER been installed. If the old spring is 3 or more coils shorter than the new part, replace the old spring.
    To check the recoil spring on a weapon, the Glock Amoror's course says to hold the weapon pointing up. Obviously, this check is done with an UNLOADED firearm :). Pull the slide fully reaward (Downwards) and let it forward slowly. "Ride the slide home" as some say. The spring should be able to complete retrun the slide forward. The slide should lock fully into battery. If it cannot, then you should replace the spring.
    Springs are relatively cheap, so when anyone asks me if they need to replace (fill in the blank), I say just do it for peace of mind. Mags, recoil springs, all wear out, so just keep track of them.
     
  7. repooc

    repooc Millennium Member

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    I have 62,000 rounds on my 3rd gen 17 and replace the recoil spring every 20,000 rounds. I don't really notice any difference between a 20,000 round spring and a brand new one.
     
  8. POLIZEI

    POLIZEI

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    I have a G17 since 1994 and I used to shoot about 8-10 thousend rounds a year. I have never changed the recoilspring an it is doing fine.
    But change the little spring on the connector every 10.000. Mine broke after 60.000.;P
     
  9. ChaneyD

    ChaneyD

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    Glocks answer to this is simple: when the weapon no longer will stay in battery, replace the spring. I check my weapons quite regularly to see that they do.
     
  10. VincentZ

    VincentZ

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    The stock recoil spring assemblies last a LONG time with standard pressure ammo. Longer than most shooters will ever need. I carry a spare in my shooting kit since it is only $7 from Glockmeister. Not that the spring will wear out - I've just seen a few come apart. (For that matter I also carry a spare trigger spring and slide lock spring.)

    The way I was told to test the recoil spring at home is to take an UNLOADED pistol with an EMPTY magazine inserted and retract the slide about 1/4-1/2". Let the slide go. If it easily and fully returns to battery, then your spring is probably OK. I do this test as part of my after-cleaning inspection since it is so quick and easy.

    At the range you can very carefully perform the same test with your finger off the trigger, a loaded pistol, and a full magazine since magazine spring pressure and extractor tension can also play a role.