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Rational
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Now, for the record: I'm a big fan of Grant Thompson's videos. The guy is really smart, and comes up with all kinds of neat and cool stuff.

But boy oh boy....his general firearms knowledge and usage needs a serious upgrade.


Shoots lead bullets in polygonal rifling, and doesn't resize the bullets either. Then points the gun at his head as well.

Come on Grant....

I dunno....maybe I'm just overreacting.

UPDATE 07/30/2019: Grant Thompson passed away last night at the age of 39. Cause as of right now is unknown.
 

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That guy is an idiot as far as guns are concerned based on that video. He also doesn't know much about Cadmium.

wp
 

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Rational
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Discussion Starter #6
That guy is an idiot as far as guns are concerned based on that video. He also doesn't know much about Cadmium.

wp
Wow...I see that stuff is very toxic. Is it found in car batteries?
 

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That's a guy that knows nothing about reloading and throat depth/ogive of a barrel related to the OAL

There's no issue of lead in a Glock barrel if the barrel is slugged so you know the proper size bulllet to use and the proper hardness
 

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Rational
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Discussion Starter #10
That's a guy that knows nothing about reloading and throat depth/ogive of a barrel related to the OAL

There's no issue of lead in a Glock barrel if the barrel is slugged so you know the proper size bulllet to use and the proper hardness
I only know the very basics of reloading, but even I was concerned about how far he'd seat that bullet with the pliers. Too deep can increase pressures to dangerous levels.
 

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This video is a testament to the durability of the gun. Not to the quality of the firearm knowledge of the shooter/reloader.
 

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SAFETY PIN CRITIC!!
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That's a guy that knows nothing about reloading and throat depth/ogive of a barrel related to the OAL

There's no issue of lead in a Glock barrel if the barrel is slugged so you know the proper size bulllet to use and the proper hardness
I would imagine that it also helps to CLEAN the bore WAY more often say every 50 rounds of lead cast ammo?!! :supergrin:

Hardcast lead bullets in polygonal rifling like buffalo bore DO keyhole, which is why most guys swap out for traditional rifled barrels.

The idea is to know the "mix" for how hard the lead should be? Through experimentation or do I have this all wrong??

Cadmium is extremely toxic. If any of that crap atomized in the heat and pressure of being fired and you unknowingly inhaled it...:ack: maybe I'm going a tad overboard, but is this guy from San Fran or something...?? God how stupid.
 

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So, what have I learned from this video.
#1. I can stop putting money away for reloading equipment. Apparently a pair of channel lock pliers that I already have is all that is needed!
 

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SAFETY PIN CRITIC!!
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So, what have I learned from this video.
#1. I can stop putting money away for reloading equipment. Apparently a pair of channel lock pliers that I already have is all that is needed!
:rofl:

I'm as green as Kermit the frog when it comes to reloading. I look at a Dillon 550 and imagine needing a week long hands on training and set up session!
 

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I decided to watch it, took some notes while it was going because I knew there were going to be so many gems:

1. Lead is soft. If it will chamber then it should conform to the barrel upon firing (it won't get "stuck").
2. When he did his first vice-string-shooting test, I could not believe he did so with more than one round in the gun.
3. It's his gun, but what a great way to beat it to hell by hitting it with an axe and having it come back and hit a rock.
4. So he's not using any kind of load data at all, he's just replacing a jacketet bullet with a lead bullet, using a pliers to do both jobs. While that's probably fine, he's a much braver man than I am.
5. The bullet got "chewed up by the barrel?" I think the wood did that.
6. Ah, he shows that they were tumbling, going in sideways. That would explain the strange shape of the recovered bullets.

IMO, this kind of thing isn't something you want to jump into without doing some serious research first. He really should add to his video, saying that in hindsight, what he did was dangerous but does not have to be if one is simply willing to take some time and learn. But I suppose he has a large following of people, many of whom are probably just as knowledgeable about guns as he apparently is (as in, not). Maybe this is a net positive for public opinion on guns. No clue.

Just my 0.02
 

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I would imagine that it also helps to CLEAN the bore WAY more often say every 50 rounds of lead cast ammo?!! :supergrin:

Hardcast lead bullets in polygonal rifling like buffalo bore DO keyhole, which is why most guys swap out for traditional rifled barrels.

The idea is to know the "mix" for how hard the lead should be? Through experimentation or do I have this all wrong??

Cadmium is extremely toxic. If any of that crap atomized in the heat and pressure of being fired and you unknowingly inhaled it...:ack: maybe I'm going a tad overboard, but is this guy from San Fran or something...?? God how stupid.
Anyone who uses a pair of channel locks to seat a bullet without any regard to how seating the bullet deeper (and reducing case volume) might increase chamber pressures is an accident waiting to happen. And I wonder if he even knew enough to lube those bullets? He acted like he had never fired a lead bullet out of a gun before. If he didn't lubed them, that would lead the barrel regardless of hardness.

To determine hardness the best way is to cast some bullets from pure lead and weigh them and measure the diameter with a micrometer. Then cast slime bullets from an alloy that is known to be a very hard alloy such as linotype and weigh and measure a few bullets cast from that alloy.

Bullets made of pure lead will weigh more than than bullets alloyed with tin or Antimony. And also, bullets with the most alloy will shrink less than lead and will measure out to a larger diameter than pure lead bullets cast from the same mold.

Therefore, bullets cast from an unknown alloy will be heavier and cast out at a smaller diameter if they are soft, and will weigh less and cast out to a larger diameter if they are hard. And the lighter they are, the harder they are. And that's how you determine buller hardness without a hardness tester.

The idjit in the video also didn't say how he reclaimed the lead.

There is calcium, selenium, and arsenic in battery plates and it has to be skimmed off when the lead is melted. The dross from melting them down will, if contacted with water or even humidity in the air will release stibnine, a gaseous arsenic compound. Not only that, but even if you try to flush out the acid with water before you take apart the battery you will still get the acid on your clothing because even diluted battery acid SEEKS OUT cloth and eats holes in it.

Salvaging car batteries for lead is hazardous and a lot of aggravation and effort for a small amount of lead. It's better to buy lead at the going rate at your local recycling yard. I used to save aluminum cans and take them to the local recycling yard and basically trade five-ten bucks worth of cans for 5-10 bucks worth of lead.
 

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SAFETY PIN CRITIC!!
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Anyone who uses a pair of channel locks to seat a bullet without any regard to how seating the bullet deeper (and reducing case volume) might increase chamber pressures is an accident waiting to happen. And I wonder if he even knew enough to lube those bullets? He acted like he had never fired a lead bullet out of a gun before. If he didn't lubed them, that would lead the barrel regardless of hardness.

To determine hardness the best way is to cast some bullets from pure lead and weigh them and measure the diameter with a micrometer. Then cast slime bullets from an alloy that is known to be a very hard alloy such as linotype and weigh and measure a few bullets cast from that alloy.

Bullets made of pure lead will weigh more than than bullets alloyed with tin or Antimony. And also, bullets with the most alloy will shrink less than lead and will measure out to a larger diameter than pure lead bullets cast from the same mold.

Therefore, bullets cast from an unknown alloy will be heavier and cast out at a smaller diameter if they are soft, and will weigh less and cast out to a larger diameter if they are hard. And the lighter they are, the harder they are. And that's how you determine buller hardness without a hardness tester.

The idjit in the video also didn't say how he reclaimed the lead.

There is calcium, selenium, and arsenic in battery plates and it has to be skimmed off when the lead is melted. The dross from melting them down will, if contacted with water or even humidity in the air will release stibnine, a gaseous arsenic compound. Not only that, but even if you try to flush out the acid with water before you take apart the battery you will still get the acid on your clothing because even diluted battery acid SEEKS OUT cloth and eats holes in it.

Salvaging car batteries for lead is hazardous and a lot of aggravation and effort for a small amount of lead. It's better to buy lead at the going rate at your local recycling yard. I used to save aluminum cans and take them to the local recycling yard and basically trade five-ten bucks worth of cans for 5-10 bucks worth of lead.
Thank you sir for your excellent help.
From what I understand even when slugging barrels with soft pure lead balls, the barrel needs lubing to prevent lead deposits and getting stuck in the bore using JUST dowel rod segments and a plastic gunsmith mallet.

GOOFY had NO idea how hard that junk was he rammed though there at firing pressures and speeds.
Also has no idea in hell what happens to a lead bullet vs a FMJ when fired into wood etc!

Without a fully supported barrel he was looking at blowing up a $500 handgun and even then it's like the devil rolling dice!

However it comes up you ain't a gonna like it.

Metallurgy is a wonderful thing!
 
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