GlockTalk Forum banner

41 - 60 of 124 Posts

·
Free Full Clip!
Joined
·
17,094 Posts
I haven’t had a dog since i was a kid, so I guess I really never did as my parents had all the responsibilities...fast forward 50 some years, and as I’m pushing retirement ( wife deceased, no children) I’m researching large protective breeds ( GSD, Rottweiler, Doberman, etc.)
To cut to the chase, how much do you budget for your dog monthly/yearly, food, vet etc?
"To cut to the chase, how much do you budget for your dog monthly/yearly, food, vet etc?"

Dog food is cheap and it's not even something you even have to budget for. Years ago when I wasn't working steady I had no problem being able to feed my 65 pound Lab-Sheppard mix. I fed my dog kibble and added table scraps or sometimes milk and she stayed healthy on what I fed her. Dry Cat food was another treat sprinkled on top of the kibble especially when I explained to the dog who hated cats, that it was cat food.

Vet bills are another story. Most dogs stay healthy and don't need veterinary care except for the occasional injury or something like porcupine quill removal a foxtail weed in the ear.

But some dogs get cancer or diabetes or other medical conditions that used to be unusual for dogs. As much as I loved my dog, I couldn't see trying to keep the dog alive with some kind of on-going medical problem and spending thousands of dollars on prolonging a poor quality of life.
 

·
Mentally Frozen
Joined
·
24,717 Posts
Our old Lab had two ACL surgeries, but he was still worth every penny..
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rotn1

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,945 Posts
If you’re ready to put in the TIME, effort, & some $$, go for it. If you are a ‘dog person’, you’ll get back more than put in. The main thing they want is time spent together, all else is secondary.

Besides shelters a lot of ‘re-homing’ goes on. It’s not that hard to find what you want under 2 years old. After a few months that dog will be ‘yours’. Put the feelers out. I’m supportive, it is harder to care for a dog when single, but it can be done.

6A2FB029-7612-4A1C-AE22-051C3B336EA3.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,063 Posts
I'll just skip a few and say it may cost somebody in OK the farm after their sweet loving Pit killed a distant relative on my wife's side a few weeks ago. 70 something sweet old lady never had a chance.

I'm guessing the owner didn't budget for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,753 Posts
We have a brother and sister Chihuahua’s that each has had to have both knees fixed by a specialist in another state, counting buying both and everything else we have over $10,000 in each and there just 7 years old. I just spent $1650 to fence them in a large play area in our yard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,044 Posts
Wife and I had a dog for almost 16 years. He's gone and we miss him, but we probably won't ever get another one. He was awesome, but I like not having to worry about taking care of a pet anymore. Life is just easier now.
 

·
Fightin' Fire
Joined
·
2,051 Posts
Had a yellow lab that cost us plenty. The one time we were at the vet and they asked us what the spending limit would be to cure the dog of something or other. The wife said do whatever it takes. I looked at her and her response was "we will take out a second mortgage if we have to".
Needless to say, we made the Christmas card list. In fact we were at the vet just after Christmas and I thanked them for the Christmas card. The girl said ohhhhh not everyone gets a Christmas card. I said yeah it was neat that everyone signed and put a personal note on it. She then looked at me and said "those are the special cards that only a select few people get". I didn't feel very special knowing that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,818 Posts
Not once did I ever give it a thought.

We have two mutts, sisters that are 8 months apart, 2 different litters.

As I can recall, groomers 4 times a year about 90 dollars a trip. The veterinarian 2 times a year about 600 and food is about 30 dollars very 6 weeks or so.

We have had them almost 13 years and would spend more but they have been very healthy and its not necessary.
 

·
Friends Call Me "Flash"
Joined
·
4,163 Posts
The first week that I had Jake the Wonder Dog, I tried to return him to friend Gloria. She objected and stated "He's just a baby!" She was right. You must TEACH your dog how to behave!

I didn't know that I needed a dog and after a while, we became inseparable. I don't OWN Jake. He is my "family" and 24/7 companion. He is protective of me and a wonderful watchdog. Nothing escapes his senses and he is careful not to alert unless something is wrong.

Jake loves me, his Daddy, more than my Human family ever did! I saw him nearly get hit by a car and I ran in front of the car to grab him. Love goes both ways.

Jake lives inside the house with me and we have a daily "routine" as we go about our lives.

Jake has had trouble with his teeth for years. We had 3 sessions of Dental surgery at $300-$400 each, but he is in terrible pain and I can't allow that! He's ready for a fourth Dental trip as soon as I get my second eye surgery. So far, he's had 26 teeth pulled.

Friend Bonnie is Jake's "Momma." She got Jake some expensive doggie food ($28/bag) that he can chew and it's made a huge difference in his weight and health! Don't feed your dog crap food. It really screws them up!

Jake weighs 8 1/2 pounds, he's 10.5 years old and I shudder to think about losing him! Thankfully, small dogs live longer than big dogs.

Jake is FAR more than a dog. He is my FAMILY! How would you put a price on that?

Flash
 

·
NRA Life Member
Joined
·
5,536 Posts
I’m noticing that vets now tend to want to try and prolong the life of dogs through treatments that were once reserved for people. I’m not saying that’s bad, just an observation. And I’m sure there are exceptions.

I would question the wisdom of cancer treatments and experimental surgeries on a 12-15 year old dog. That would once have been a certain recommendation for euthanasia. If you go with these recommendations, you could spend a small fortune.

But when it comes to other people’s dog and the money they choose to spend on them, they need to make the decision they can live with.

It does seem ethics finally comes into play on dogs the same as it does on a feeding tube or life support for Grandma.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rotn1

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,036 Posts
@89109 There’s some good info on here and some down right false info in this thread. So let’s take it from the top:

RESEARCH EACH BREED YOU’RE INTERESTED IN BEFORE YOU DECIDE TO BUY ONE. You have to get a dog that fits your lifestyle. If you get a high energy dog but you’re a lazy ass, it’s not going to work.

If you’re looking at a “protective” breed, that means a working dog. Be prepared to spend $1000-$3000 depending on the breed. Get it from a reputable breeder. No rescues. You don’t need someone else’s problem dog. A good breeder will make sure your pup comes with a hip and elbow guarantee. Genetics are everything. And the breeder will be available to take the dog back if needed.

Working breeds need to be worked several times a day in order to train them properly, and keep them from getting board and destroying things. Be prepared to spend $1000 or more at a good reputable trainer. And be prepared for a high energy dog that you will spend at least 3 hours a day burning off energy. They like to work!

A good secure dog crate for training and transporting will run you anywhere from $100 to $750. You’ll need one that the dog can’t tear up. And you’ll use it for house breaking as well as having it for the dogs safe place. A good crate pad is under $65.

You’ll need a good reputable Veterinarian. They vary on prices, make sure they come highly recommended. My Vet bills for my female GSD are about $450 a year. That includes office visits, shots, flea and tick meds.

I feed a pretty good food. I go through 65 lbs a month for 3 full size dogs. The 65 lb bag is $120. So your might be $40 or so a month.

Toys or training aids, I spend about $100 a year on Kong’s, Balls on a string, and frisbees. I do use an E-Collar on my dogs and if you need one, it’s about $250. My collars cost $65 each and my leather leashes are about $60 each. Prong Collars are around $30.

If you have any questions about anything dog related there are a number of us on here who can help you. @pgg00 @itisbruno @Rotn1 @Mayhem like Me @BuckyP just to name a few
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,534 Posts
Way more now than it was even 10 years ago. Feeding a dog in a month is nothing compared to the vet bills, even if it is just for routine checkups, flea, tick, heartworm treatments, etc. God forbid the dog has some health issues and needs surgery. Or needs to see a "specialist" somewhere, yes they are not just doing the "specializing in every little thing and charging a huge price for it" on humans only. The vet industry as a whole figured out now a lot of people will spend huge bucks on their pet. In about a year an a half we spent around $8k on our dog outside of routine stuff. We had pet insurance for a little while, all they wanted to do was try to deny everything to get out of it and upped the premium every 6 months when renew time came. So we said screw you pet insurance and dropped it. I like dogs better than people for the most part, just like anything the whole deal has gotten out of hand on the health care end for the animal.

Our dog is a lab mixed with something. A rescue from down south, paid $200 for her she was a little pup. Main vet bills were because of urinary tract issues and needed corrective surgery, imaging, testing, etc. My sister got an english bulldog she wanted, despite my warnings. English bulldogs are great dogs on many levels, they just have a lot of health issues, which my sister found out the hard way. Breeders really screwed up the breed unfortunately.
 

·
real dogs
Joined
·
1,940 Posts
My mother had cats when we were growing up. I like them but am now allergic.

Wife and I watch a lot of vet programs on cable and I'm stunned by the cost of vet surgeries etc. One person on Dr Jeff's Rocky Mountain program last night got a quote of $7000 to fix a broken leg on a rottweiler!!

Our last of two cats never had any issues other than a rare hairball that she cleared herself, great pet. Don
You dont get to be a veterinarian by going to night school. You do learn a lot of skills i vet school and you do incur a considerable debt. Within levels of endeavor a veterinarian is equal to a physician in skill levels and in some cases equiptment and supply costs are quite comparable. Most drugs are the same and a lot of equiptment is the same as in human medicine. Most orthopedic supplies come from the same suppliers. Expensive , what can I say.
That being said some geographic areas and some practices dip a bit deeper into your wallet than others. Some teaching hospitals/universities run quite high on their pricing. A few specialty practices such as one in NYC and one in Mass. wil generate billing not unlike a stay at the Mayo or Hopkins. However, many competent practices could probably fixed most Rottweiler legs for 1/3 to 1/2 of the theatrical estimate.

I retired a few years ago and I will say that the cost of vet care was very stable for decades but over the past 20-30 years costs have gone up dramatically. In some locales by multiples.
 

·
real dogs
Joined
·
1,940 Posts
@89109 There’s some good info on here and some down right false info in this thread. So let’s take it from the top:

RESEARCH EACH BREED YOU’RE INTERESTED IN BEFORE YOU DECIDE TO BUY ONE. You have to get a dog that fits your lifestyle. If you get a high energy dog but you’re a lazy ass, it’s not going to work.

If you’re looking at a “protective” breed, that means a working dog. Be prepared to spend $1000-$3000 depending on the breed. Get it from a reputable breeder. No rescues. You don’t need someone else’s problem dog. A good breeder will make sure your pup comes with a hip and elbow guarantee. Genetics are everything. And the breeder will be available to take the dog back if needed.

Working breeds need to be worked several times a day in order to train them properly, and keep them from getting board and destroying things. Be prepared to spend $1000 or more at a good reputable trainer. And be prepared for a high energy dog that you will spend at least 3 hours a day burning off energy. They like to work!

A good secure dog crate for training and transporting will run you anywhere from $100 to $750. You’ll need one that the dog can’t tear up. And you’ll use it for house breaking as well as having it for the dogs safe place. A good crate pad is under $65.

You’ll need a good reputable Veterinarian. They vary on prices, make sure they come highly recommended. My Vet bills for my female GSD are about $450 a year. That includes office visits, shots, flea and tick meds.

I feed a pretty good food. I go through 65 lbs a month for 3 full size dogs. The 65 lb bag is $120. So your might be $40 or so a month.

Toys or training aids, I spend about $100 a year on Kong’s, Balls on a string, and frisbees. I do use an E-Collar on my dogs and if you need one, it’s about $250. My collars cost $65 each and my leather leashes are about $60 each. Prong Collars are around $30.

If you have any questions about anything dog related there are a number of us on here who can help you. @pgg00 @itisbruno @Rotn1 @Mayhem like Me @BuckyP just to name a few

I wish many people would exercise this level of preparedness before "getting"(having" children.
 
41 - 60 of 124 Posts
Top