How many shots do YOU usually take?

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Goaltender66, Jan 6, 2003.

  1. Goaltender66

    Goaltender66 NRA GoldenEagle

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    I received a Remington 870 as a Christmas present this year (great shotgun, thanks for asking), and as part of my research into Remington I found the following article. So, I'm interested...is this article pretty much, pardon the expression, on the mark?
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    How Many Shots Bag a Deer?

    Studies show hunters usually fire two to seven shots for each deer bagged. The reasons are varied and might surprise you.

    By Patrick Durkin

    Hunters in whitetail-rich areas often say opening morning of gun season sounds like a Civil War re-enactment. In fact, maybe it’s me who always says that. As I sit in my treestand in Wisconsin’s farm country, I find myself doubting the woods could hold enough deer to support such fusillades.

    But then I remind myself some deer get shot at more than once, and we’ve become accustomed to taking multiple shots. After all, we’ve had semiautomatic shotguns and rifles for 100 years, and lever-actions longer than that. Plus, a skilled rifleman can work a bolt-action nearly as fast.

    I also muse that maybe some of that shooting is a holdover from the muzzleloading era, and that those first "priming" shots pay homage to the "fouling shot" required in the original black-powder days. The difference, of course, is that we’re priming ourselves, not the barrel. Speaking from experience, it seems too easy for modern hunters to squeeze off a quick first shot when the adrenaline is pumping and you know a follow-up shot is only a second away.

    Not only that, but everyone hates to fail when they shoot at a deer. Who isn’t tempted to take their shot at redemption with a second, third, fourth and maybe even a fifth shot at a fleeing deer? New York’s Lawrence R. Koller, who wrote the deer hunting classic Shots at Whitetails in 1948, said this about the agony of missing:

    "The primary consideration in deer hunting is to hit your buck. Weeks of anticipation, days of deliberation in choosing rifle, load and sights, plus plenty of shooting practice, all total zero if you fail to connect. Added to this is that sinking sensation in the pit of your stomach when your trophy vanishes in the timber, well under its own power."

    One-Shot Exceptions

    Despite the best teaching and encouragement to the contrary, many of us do not hold out for a one-shot killing opportunity. For whatever reason, multiple shots are more common with deer hunters than one-shot attempts. And, like it or not, this is not a new phenomenon. Consider this comment:

    "It is a good rule always to try to get as near the game as possible …At the same time, I am a great believer in powder-burning, and if I cannot get near, I will generally try a shot anyhow, if there is a chance of the rifle’s carrying to it. In this way, a man will now and then, in the midst of many misses, make a very good long shot, but he should not try to deceive himself into the belief that these occasional long shots are to be taken as samples of his ordinary skill. Yet it is curious to see how a really truthful man will forget his misses, and his hits at close quarters, and, by dint of constant repetition, will finally persuade himself that he is in the habit of killing his game at three- or four-hundred yards."

    Some might consider that writer unethical, but the man behind those words is President Theodore Roosevelt. As we know, TR is the father of the Boone and Crockett Club, and was a founding force in the United States’ conservation movement. That quote is from his book Hunting Trips of a Ranchman.

    What about deer hunting in the new century? With all the shooting Eastern hunters hear every year on opening day, has anyone tried to figure out how many shots are fired for each deer that’s bagged? Granted, some guys sit on their stands and count the number of shots they hear during the first few hours so they can reveal their data to friends back in camp. The trouble is, that doesn’t give us a success rate.

    For that, we need researchers, and several of them actually have studied the ratios of shots fired and deer bagged. Not surprisingly, however, these ratio vary, depending on several factors, including hunter numbers, deer densities, deer movement, season lengths, hunting methods and firearms types.

    For instance, the more hunters who go afield in a short season, the more intense the competition and pressure will be to "get your deer." Also, the more deer in the woods, the more the likelihood for multiple shots. In turn, the more hunting pressure, the more likely whitetails will be moving. And the more whitetails move, the less likely they’ll present stationary targets.

    A 1972 study at Wisconsin’s Sandhill Wildlife Area — a state-owned, 9,000-acre fenced research facility — found 6.5 shots were fired for every whitetail registered. Other studies at Sandhill varied a bit from the ’72 study, ranging from 3.1 to seven shots for every deer bagged. Studies elsewhere usually reported fewer shots fired per deer killed. Research in Illinois, Ontario and South Carolina found the averages were 4.7, 1.6 and 1.2 shots per kill, respectively.

    Why such variance between states? One obvious difference between Wisconsin and those other studies is stiffer hunting competition. Even though hunter numbers at Sandhill are restricted, deer hunters in Wisconsin — as in other huge deer hunting states like Michigan and Pennsylvania — often grow up in competitive hunting environments. In 1972, Wisconsin had 518,000 gun hunters, and in 2001 they numbered 688,261. For perspective, Illinois and South Carolina have fewer than 200,000 firearms hunters today, and Ontario has about 165,000.

    Bag Limits and Herd Size

    The Sandhill studies reported by John Kubisiak, a former researcher with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, provide insights into how shooting habits change depending on various factors. For instance, the worst shooting performance, a 7.4-1 shots-to-deer ratio, occurred during the 1963-68 rifle/shotgun hunts when any deer could be shot and the Sandhill herd was estimated at 32 per square mile of range. Next worst was a 7-1 shots-to-deer ratio during the 1970 rifle/shotgun hunt when the herd numbered 44 per square mile. Deer were plentiful and any deer could be shot, so lead filled the air.

    Lest anyone think those numbers are skewed by a few individuals who just happened to "shoot more and shoot more poorly," 71 percent of the 1963-68 hunters and 91 percent of the 1970 hunters fired more than one shot.

    The best shooting performance, a 3.4-1 shots-to-deer ratio, occurred during the 1987-89 rifle/shotgun hunts when the population was 41. That year, hunters had to be sure they were shooting a deer specified by their permit. Some hunters could shoot any deer, but usually held out for one of the enclosure’s famous trophy bucks. Meanwhile, the rest of the hunters had to shoot an antlerless deer, so they usually waited until the deer was close enough for a careful look at its head.

    Firearms Differences

    Another factor studied at Sandhill was what happens to those averages and shooting ratios when hunters use handguns or muzzleloaders.

    Perhaps surprisingly, even though muzzleloading rifles can only hold one shot at a time, these hunters fired 5.3 shots for every deer they killed during the 1977-78 seasons. What factors were at work? These hunters, using sidelocks and flintlocks, could shoot at any deer, so many of them weren’t selective. Another factor was that this was the state’s first special hunting opportunity for muzzleloaders. It’s possible many of the hunters were inexperienced with muzzleloaders, and some were using one for the first time.

    The group taking the most shots, however, were handgun hunters in 1970 who fired 14.2 shots for every deer bagged. From 1963 to 1970, hand-gunners also shot more rounds than their long-gun counterparts. Post-hunt interviews with successful hunters those years found handgun users fired eight shots for each deer bagged, while long-gun hunters averaged five shots per deer.

    Further, 35 percent of successful handgun hunters killed their deer with one shot, and this group averaged three shots and two hits for each deer they bagged, suggesting many of them were effective shooters. These hunters tended to take shorter shots, with the average being 40 yards. Of 63 deer bagged by handgun hunters, 39 percent were within 25 yards of the hunter, and 79 percent were within 50 yards. In addition, 58 percent of the deer were walking or standing when shot with a handgun, and of those running, 71 percent were within 40 yards and none was farther than 60 yards.

    First Deer, Second Deer

    Another Sandhill researcher, Professor Thomas Heberlein from the University of Wisconsin, found differences in shooting behavior when hunters shot at more than one deer. Most shots taken at the first deer were 50 yards or less. If they shot at a second deer, it was usually between 50 and 100 yards. Also, about one-third of the first deer they shot at were standing, while nearly half the second deer were running.

    Most hunters only took one shot at a second deer, but they often fired at least twice at the first deer. And whether they fired at one deer or two, more than half of the hunters missed their first shot. The first deer were more likely to be killed with follow-up shots because they were usually closer and standing still when first fired upon. In this scenario, by firing repeatedly, hunters bagged the deer three out of five times. On second deer, however, because so many of them were running, hunters usually got off only one shot, so they bagged only two of every five deer on their second attempt. Further, 37 percent of the hunters who got a shot at one deer failed to bag a deer at Sandhill.

    What about the differences in success of standing vs. running deer? Heberlein found about 70 percent of deer walking or standing were killed. Success dropped to 37 percent when deer were running, and less than 10 percent on a second deer if it was running.

    Fun With Numbers

    After bouncing all those numbers around in our heads, it seems only natural that we try to figure out how they translate into the number of total rounds fired during a firearms season. Given the averages discussed, let’s be conservative and say North America’s gun hunters fire 3.5 shots for every deer bagged. At that rate, Wisconsin’s hunters would have fired 1.85 million rounds during the 2000 firearms season to bag the state’s record gun-kill of 528,494. But if Wisconsin’s hunters fired 6.5 shots for every deer bagged in 2000, they fired 3.43 million rounds to achieve that harvest.

    Using 3.5 shots as the average, how many shots might have been fired in the rest of the nation’s top 10 deer states in 2000? Let’s look:

    Texas hunters would have fired 1.51 million shots to bag 431,927 deer; Pennsylvania, 1.49 million shots to bag 426,078 deer; Michigan, 1.4 million shots to bag 400,000 whitetails; Georgia, 1.33 million shots to bag 380,000 deer; Alabama, 1.3 million shots to bag 372,000 deer; New York, 969,034 shots to bag 276,867 deer; Louisiana, 896,000 shots to bag 256,000 deer; Mississippi, 850,5000 shots to bag 243,000 deer; and Missouri 771,732 shots to bag 220,495 deer.

    In other words, hunters in the top 10 whitetail states in 2000 fired an estimated 12.34 million shots to bag 3.54 million deer.

    Conclusion

    With all that lead and copper flying, you might assume the deer woods are unsafe. Actually, deer hunting has never been safer. In Wisconsin, for example, whether the number of shots fired by its nearly 700,000 hunters in 2000 was 1.85 or 3.43 million, the state recorded only 21 shooting accidents, including two fatalities, during gun season. Further, eight of those shootings were self-inflicted. Therefore, only 13 of a possible 3.43 million shots, or .0004 percent, struck another person.

    Compare that with 1970. During that season, the number of Wisconsin gun hunters was 502,000 and 13 of them were killed by gunfire. In addition, the deer kill in 1970 was one of the lowest on record the past 40 years at 72,844.

    It’s difficult, if not inaccurate, to say hunters in 2002 are better shots than their counterparts in 1970. We can say, however, that when today’s hunters miss, their bullets are less likely to hit another person.

    If nothing else, that might bring some reassurance on opening morning when gun shots seem to be erupting from every hollow and hilltop within hearing range.
     
  2. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    i've only had one deer that needed 2. it wasn't a bad shot either. the slug (this was in OH where it's SG only) hit the spine, shattering it. the deer dropped straight away, but was only paralized. i quickly put another in to end it.

    i've seen the guys who are taking the seven shots per deer. these are the same folks you see at the range that you avoid because their gun handling is unsafe and they can barely keep it on the 3' square paper at 100 yards.

    i can't even remember taking 7 shells with me to hunt deer. i usually put 1 in the gun and 2 in my pocket and was good to go.
     

  3. G36's Rule

    G36's Rule Senior Member

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    Typically in my family, one shot per deer. I have killed three Whitetail and one Mule Deer this year so far. I fired five shots for the four deer. The Mule deer was moving and headed for rough country and although my first shot turned out to be a solid lung shot, I hit him again to anchor him.
     
  4. Guest

    Out of the 7 deer I've taken in my life, I've only needed a second shot once. That was after I wounded a buck when my .270 bullet deflected off a thin branch that I couldn't see through my scope and ended up wounding the deer. It stumbled down a bank and into a thicket where it got hung up. I finished him off with a round from my .357 Magnum.
     
  5. Hairtrigger

    Hairtrigger

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    My area is very populated and flat. Roads make square miles with mostly farmland and a few small woods. Deer are hunted by posting hunters and pushing. Most groups have a pickup or two circling the mile as well. Shots at deer are usually running. Ohio is shotgun only.

    I hunted that way until I was exposed to "real" hunting in the west, now I do not hunt deer in Ohio. Most hunters are in and out of the mile sections fast enough that they usually do not have permission, at least written, for the section.
    this may not be true for most of the state, but true for the part that I live in and have relationships with the land owners.
     
  6. Owen M. Eaton

    Owen M. Eaton

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    Congrats on the 870. I wish I could find a lawn mower that thrives on
    neglect and abuse like the pump gun from "Big Green".

    My 870 is a 3" Mag with a smooth bore. State of the art twenty years ago: "OOOO, rifle sights!" I have fired 2 shoots in the last 3 seasons and killed 2 deer. 2000 my father was in the hospital
    so I didn't hunt, and this year I was working with a new Lab puppy, so
    I didn't even get a tag, but my old 870 did the job in '99 and '01.
    The first a 65 yard heart shot, the second spined at under 20.

    I think the rush to the sabot slug and rifled barrel overlook one
    basic fact: If I can't AFFORD to shoot it A LOT, is it really a good idea? I've found that my gun likes the Brenneke 1 .oz rifled slug.
    I can get 100 of them for less than $60. (On clearance in January)
    I try to shoot a lot AT THE RANGE, so I can shoot less in the woods.

    From my stand I have 40, 60 and 90 yard shot presentations likely.
    I like to shoot at least 15 rounds at paper from each range. (5 bench,
    10 off hand) This is a weekend project, not all at once. My final test is 2 rounds from 40, 2 from 60 and 1 from 90, all off hand at my 7" steel gong. If I get a good solid clang 5 times I'm ready to hunt.
    Obviously I'm not going to "waste" that many expensive sabot slugs.
    I know guys with expensive rifled barrels and nice scopes who shoot
    less than 10 rounds before opening day, and have never tried more than 1 brand of slug. Do they have more range than I do? Well, yes.
    Are they making the best use of the money they spent? Hmmmmm...
     
  7. TJC

    TJC "No Compromise" Millennium Member

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    Most of the time 1 shot 1 kill. I have fired 2-3 rds at a time. It is usually at multiple deer when I have antlerless permits to fill along with the buck tag.

    The 11-87 with rifled barrel and leupold scope just keep producing.
     
  8. Craigster

    Craigster

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    Hundreds of rounds with my rifle and thousands with my pistol but Ive never needed more than one when pointing at a Deer or Elk.

    Craig
     
  9. Michigun

    Michigun live free or die

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    I hunt a "shotgun only" zone. One shot is what it takes me. I've never had one go more then 30 yards with my shotgun, most going down in their tracks. Although it did take me till the 3rd shot on my buck last year, it was a mental error. I had changed my "zero" for my gun before season & when the "buck fever" set in I reverted back to the previous "zero" & put 2 "well aimed shots" over the deer's back. I snapped out of it, readjusted my "hold over" & sent the 3rd round in behind the shoulder. The distance was 90+ yards & I was shooting "off-hand". I was lucky that buck got confused & didn't take off running. He stood there for all 3 shots just looking around. Each shot was separated by a good 2 seconds.

    Before I built a "slug gun" I had only hunted deer with a muzzleloader in the "shotgun only" zone... maybe that's the difference.......

    I wonder how many of us "one shot, one kill" deer hunters are also bow & muzzleloader deer hunters?

    I use a Beretta 390 with a Leupold 3x9x40mm mounted on a Hastings cantilever "fully rifled" barrel. I use Federal's Barns Expander 3" mag sabots because it shot the best out of all sabots available as of last year. I do have a few new sabots to try out before next season though... just to make sure I have the best for my gun. Although a 1" or less grouping is going to be hard for another sabot to beat... ;)

    I do find that most "volley shooting" deer hunters are using minimal or sub par equipment & have minimal practice. It's just what I see in my area.
     
  10. MarkCO

    MarkCO CLM Millennium Member

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    I'd say the article is conservative, but accurate. The vast majority of sportsmen lie like a rug. The numbers of game taken are inflated, the distances stretched and the number of times skunked, or missed are deflated. This occurs with hunting and fishing.

    I always say this when I hear shots... 1 shot = 1 animal, 2 shots - maybe an animal, 3 shots = no animal.

    Most hunters could not consistently hit a pie plate at 100 yards under field conditions. They go sit at the range, with a rest, fire 3 shots and feel they are excellent markesmen. Volunteer at your local range during sight in and you will be disgusted! Single shot tag filling...Hooey!

    I hunt quite a bit, and I know that when I was young and starting out that my shooting skills, and my hutning skills, needed work. I shot my rifles empty several times. I saw my dad, and the other men we hunted with miss on a failry regular clip as well. I'd say 3-5 rounds fired per animal was about the norm.

    When I was 15, I went antelope hunting. I had 2 tags. After one series of missing 3 shots in a row, I asked my dad if I could borrow a box of ammo. He gave me a box with about 12 rounds left in it. He had his 2 antelope, and I had 12 rounds to get my second. Fortunatley the next shot was on the mark and we went home with 11 un-used shells. But, for the 4 antelope we took, 89 rounds were fired! That is 22.3 rounds per animal. DESPICABLE.

    I decided that, despite my parents prohibition, I needed practice, and specifically, competition. I went hunting everytime I got a chance and had a friend whose dad would take us to mathces.

    I followed elk herds around for 3 weeks on summer, spent hours watching deer move in my hunting areas before the season started. I became actively involved in hi-power competition, 3 gun mathces, silhouette matches and hunter rifle matches. I determined for myself to be an ethical hunter and an accomplished marksman.

    In the last 10 years, I have fired 26 rounds at big game in Colorado and harvested 24 animals with one quick fatal shot each. I had one miss at an antelope at 400 yards and one miss at a cow elk at 200 yards. The antelope was a misjudgement of distance and the bullet went just under his brisket. The second shot felled him. The cow elk was a head shot. I had spent 2 hours stalking and the herd moved a different way than I had predicted. The body was covered with thick pinyons and she was the last animal in the herd. I missed clean and did not fire again. She went up behind the pinyon I was avoiding and crested the hill and stood and looked at me. 225 yards, broadside silhouetted on a hill. No backstop...NO SHOT.

    I took a friend elk hunting this year. He had 14 shots at elk and did not harvest one. And the shots were for 80 to 250 yards, broadside! He was talking the "great white hunter talk", but if I put a patch of fur on the side of a barn, ther barn would have been safe. He does not compete, practice, learn hunting, and was generally out of shape for elk hunting.

    I am slowly switching over to pistol hunting to force myself to hunt better.

    Practice more than you lie and you should do fine.

    Sorry for the soapbox.
     
  11. duncan

    duncan Lifetime Member Millennium Member

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    EXACTLY!

    Where do they find these fools?

    With a slug gun, you only need one shot to drop the deer. And sometimes another shot to the head to put it down for good.

    Shooting on running deer is really not the best way to hunt them. Shooting at a deer with a slow stride or walk is fine since many experienced hunters know who to "pace" a target.

    But I will only take a shot within my gun's capabilities and my shooting skills PERIOD.

    Shooting on fast running deer is risky for the deer and other hunters in the area. In some areas, you do have people on opposite sides of the field shooting at the deer.

    Can never discount buck fever.

    If I can not claim my deer with one shot to drop the animal, I don't deserve to fill my tag that outing.

    And I'm not about to go around spraying and pryaing or wounding deer.

    Interesting article though.

    Last year I contacted the Washington State Dept of Wildlife and found out that most of our deer were being claimed with 50 yards with some of the hunters shooting out to 100 yards but not many past that. But we have a lot of dense woods too. I feel comfortable easily hitting a paper plate at 50-65 yards with my Rem 870;)
     
  12. WalterGA

    WalterGA Millennium Member

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    Nothing like writing 5,000 words on a 100-word subject! :)
     
  13. smilinjimmy

    smilinjimmy

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    It's like watching the A-team to go deer/elk hunting around here anymore. Lots and lots of rounds fired, yet nothing seems to die. And every year at least one hunter is killed by another, mistaken identity. (read: pay attention people!)

    One shot one kill, unless a head shot is needed to finish the job. I have killed some deer and elk both, and with only 1 exception, they all went down with a single shot. The exception was a large elk, she jumped right when I squeezed off. (another hunter walked up, not in the line of fire). She was "finished off" quickly.

    Too many times, the knowledge of "extra-rounds" readily available causes people to take shots they shouldn't. I learned to shoot with a single shot over under 410ga/.22lr; and it is "grilled" into instinct to make the first shot count. Thanks to Dad and Grandad, I will not take a chancy shot.

    Archery has become my method these days, and the same rule applies. If you cannot be sure of scoring your mark, hold fire. Sadly, I find many of the same "see-n-shoot" hunters, now carrying bows. And then they actaully BRAGGED about all the animals they wounded.

    IMHO, if you are not able to put the animal down efficiently, you should not be allowed to hunt. period. What good is venison steak all bloodshot and full-o-holes?
     
  14. Michigun

    Michigun live free or die

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    MarkCO, I've visited the range during the "mad rush" for deer sight in. I go to use their 200 yard bench. What's really sad is that I tend to outshoot many there with their rifles at those distances & shorter with my SHOTGUN! They look at me strange when I hang a 200 yard target & all I brought was a slug gun...

    I do have to say however, that none of my shooting skills were obtained through competitions at all. Not because I wasn't interested, but because there were none close enough. A lot of hunting is & should be "common knowledge"... sadly, it isn't for most.

    smilinjimmy, bow hunting is getting more & more popular every year. You defiantly see some knuckle heads with them, but you have to admit, it's still a heck of a lot better then gun season! I still like my guns, but bow season is by far my favorite. If I had only been hunting for myself this year, I'd have been done with deer hunting 2 weeks into bow season! That didn't hurt my feeling at all! ;)
     
  15. rfb45colt

    rfb45colt safe-cracker

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    My first deer season was in 1964. I haven't missed more than a couple of seasons since then. When I started hunting, I missed quite a few deer... some with multiple shots. But as time wore on, and my hunting skills (not shooting skills) improved, the shots became fewer and fewer to achieve success. I don't claim that my shooting skills are that great... or were that bad.... but it's my patience, stealth, and knowledge of deer habits (all gained from experience) that kept improving, and made the differance.

    Not all hunters have the opportunity to practice with their rifle as much as necessary... especially those in urban areas. For example, the first 20 years of my deer hunting "career", I lived in the 'burbs of Chicago. The ONLY outdoor rifle range, was a 2 1/2 hour drive through heavy traffic... each way. If I made it there once a month, I was lucky. So I devoured every piece of deer knowledge I could get my hands on... magazines, books, and later, videos. I'd go to the nearby forest preserves, early in the morning on my way to work, and again in the evening on my way home, and spend hours just watching the deer. I learned how (and why) they did things. I learned how to fool their senses, and how to get close enough, so that expert markmanship wasn't necessary for success. My deer hunting success rate soared, and I practiced shooting my firearms very little. I was able to practice with my bow in my back yard, so I became a better bow shot than a rifle shot. When gun season rolled around, I just kept using my bow-hunting tactics... but carried a peep-sighted Marlin lever-action or a shotgun with slugs, instead of a compound bow. In almost 40 years of deer hunting (and at least an average of one deer per year for that time span), I've never killed a deer that was over 100 yds away.... I haven't even tried, in more than 20 years. I know I can get closer, and I usually do. My closest, a few years ago, was 11 FEET way... and he never knew what hit him. And I got it on video. ;f

    Fortunately, eleven years ago, I moved to deer hunting heaven. And now there's a free, public shooting range just minutes away. I shoot so much now, that I reload everything I shoot, and it still costs me a small fortune. :) I can now say, without bragging, that it's been one shot, one kill, for at least the last 9-10 years. I've killed my last 9 deer with a handgun... all one shot kills. But it took me a looooong time to get there, so don't knock the new guys. They'll get better if we help, rather than ridicule, them. Practice makes perfect... I guess it's true.
     
  16. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Moderator

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    I think most bowhunters miss a LOT more than they admit; the only difference is, everyone within one mile can't HEAR their shooting (unlike gun hunters). ;)

    One shot usually is all it takes. If the critter blasts off after the shot, and I'm relatively sure the shot was well placed, I'll likely take another in hopes of preventing a long chase/trailing session. If I see/hear no positive signs of a good hit, no second shot is forthcoming unless I can (quickly) figure out why I missed the first time (highly unlikely unless it's a moving target; I try to avoid engaging those because of bad experiences in the past).
     
  17. smeet5150

    smeet5150 Southern Son

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    true words of wisdom
     
  18. dead eye

    dead eye

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    I think most people should quit typine
    and getta shooting.
    Killed many a deer only 1 shoot needed.
    If you can't shoot you need to burn some powder.
    And if I can't kill it with 1 shot I don't shoot...;I
     
  19. P-990

    P-990 Certified Nutz

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    That's a lot of shooting per animal! I must confess, I have NEVER shot a deer. A few grouse, but that's a different story. And don't ask me my shots to hit ratio on that!

    But EVERY deer I have ever seen has been within 75 yards. Most have been within 75 FEET! I know that if I have shot opportunity at that range, it should be one shot-one kill. Otherwise I've screwed up.

    My shooting skills are based in competition, and my woods skills are based on camping, hiking and fishing experience. Much time spent outdoors. Yet I know for a fact I need to polish my hunting skills more, and look forward to the opportunity to do so.

    Maybe more hunters need to admit that their shooting needs some work? See if we can bring that average down closer to 2-3 to one ratio.
     
  20. cvfd1399

    cvfd1399 Glock 21C

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    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2003
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, LA
    I have never ever shot more than 1 out of my remington 742 30.06 it knocks them down with out taking one step. My browing 12 gauge kills one shot with a slug, one time i heard a shot close to me(my dad)and i waited to see if anything came through. Sure enuf a deer running full speed across in front of me about 75 yds i thought what the hell i had 5 shots slug and 000buck shot alternatly loaded i shot all 5 times at him he kept running i thought well that was dumb after looking at the trees i mowed down in the process. After looking for the deer for about a hour i guess all my shot went into the trees. The next day i found the deer on the top of a ridge near where i shot him with one of the 000Buckshot in his lungs lol thank got it was 30degrees the meat was still good.It ended up being a medium sized 8 pt.