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How many here use 16ga shotgun?

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Sixgun_Symphony, Aug 21, 2003.

  1. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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    What do you hunt? What chokes? What loads?
     
  2. Fireman64

    Fireman64 REALIST

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  3. GRIZZLYBEAR

    GRIZZLYBEAR

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    GUILTY

    My favorite shotguns are sweet 16s.

    Use them to hunts birds and rabbits. I also shot the 16s in trap and sporting clays.

    grizz
     
  4. TScottW99

    TScottW99 NRA Life Member

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    Have used a 16 guage for everything from rabbitts, squirrels, deer, turkey and grouse. I love the sweet 16. I only have an ol' single barrel fixed choke (full) but it does the job. Hoping to get either a Ithaca 37 or a Remington 870 in a 16 guage one day. If Savage doesn't come out with a 16 guage double that is
     
  5. f1b32oPTic

    f1b32oPTic R4d104c71v3

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    the first shotgun i ever shot was a marlin bolt action 16ga with a 2 shot magazine and a barrel that was in excess of 32" some sort of goose gun with a combo selector choke. we went squirrel hunting and it performed rather well for not having a front sight post.
     
  6. noway

    noway

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    The only problem that I see with the 16ga is ammo selection. But what that said, the 16ga has always been stated as the all-around best ga for upland game when compared to the 12ga and 20ga options. Too bad the 16ga hasn't really made that big of dent in the markets for availability.

    I would buy one just for the hell of it and if items where easier to find for it.

    I know quite a few shooters with 16ga ( all reloaders ) and they always states "they have best shotgun ga on the planet ".
     
  7. TScottW99

    TScottW99 NRA Life Member

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    I used to agree with ya' until I tried Kent.... http://www.kentgamebore.com/public/products/products.asp

    They make some great sweet 16 loads. The high brass Pheasent loads are great for turkey & grouse.
     
  8. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    My dad has a Browning Citori in 16ga. After shooting it I could see why it's a great upland bird gun. Nice and light with a little more oomph than a 20ga.
     
  9. noway

    noway

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    {I used to agree with ya' until I tried Kent.... http://www.kentgamebore.com/public/...ts/products.asp}

    Thanks for the tip. But I made up my mind that if I ever found a used 16ga that I would reload for it. I had looked at a few 870 16ga models but I also found out the barrels ( thoose that have them ) are rare and very highly price. No matter how you look at it, 12ga is still more better, with greater options in both the guns and ammo section.

    It would be a hard decision for me to go from a 12ga to a 16ga. A very hard decision!

    One thing I found myself doing more often here lately, when stomping thru the fields and woods I find myself picking up spent 16ga shells ( mainly winchster ) for a friend of mine that has a 16ga.

    I guess he's happy I give him 16ga shells free for reloading. On one day, I found about 18 shells within a 50ft radius all in good to very good condition.
     
  10. MrMunster

    MrMunster

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    Ask yourself this:
    How many guns do I own?

    The answer is probably more than 1.

    The point of owning a 16 is not to 'do everything' halfway -- it is to do one thing well. If you want to do home defense, buy a short barreled 12ga pump. If you want to shoot sporting clays, get a nice O/U in 12/20/28 ga. If you want to shoot geese at high altitudes buy a 10ga (and probably a couple of shoulder surgeries!). But if you want to hunt pheasants, quail and other upland birds it is hard to beat the 16ga. My only other preference would be a 20ga; most 12ga hunters I've ever hunted with destroyed the game with their heavy loads.

    Ammo is not a problem. Although you are limited to 1-2 load weights and 1 shell length, most of the manufacturers still make 16ga loads. As already mentioned Kent makes some good loads and so does Fiocchi. Of course, if more people start shooting 16ga, then the manufacturers will eventually start offering more loads. Until then, I'll continue to reload my own.

    Guns can be found. There are quite a few types of used 16ga out there in many forms (single shot, pump, SxS, O/U) with at least Remington and Browning offering new 16ga guns recently. (I purchsed 2 brand new 16ga citoris from http://www.browningguncenter.com/special.asp last year.)

    Although I own a variety of shotguns (including 5 16ga Citoris and 1 16ga Rem 870 Wingmaster), I almost always pull out a Citori in either 20ga or the 16ga when I go shooting.
     
  11. noway

    noway

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    {most 12ga hunters I've ever hunted with destroyed the game with their heavy loads.}

    I would have to disagree. I have never taken more than 2 pellets or better worded "found more than two pellets holes in any upland game that I have hunted"


    Once and only once did I recorver a rabbit that was visually torn apart but it was shot only a few yrds from where our paths cross. THe same results would have happen with the same equally shell loaded in a 16ga or 20ga.

    If this was surely a correct statement than I would expect the 16ga to have taken off and been more common than a 12ga many many many many decades ago.

    A good 1oz to 1 1/4 or 1 3/8oz load cover alot of range and is more than adequate for most animals & birds hunted with the 12ga. the guage is just one thing, but 1 oz of lead in a 12ga/16ga/20ga of the same size birdshot equals the same number of pellets.


    just my 0.02cents
     
  12. agtman

    agtman 10mm Spartiate

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    About 5 years ago, I had the good luck of inheriting my Granddad's Browning "Sweet Sixteen" with the gold trigger. Fell in love with it right away.

    I traced the serial # thru Browning and was told it was made in 1956. It's still in great shape, perfectly functional, with only a small scratch or two on the receiver and a bit of wear on the edge of the buttplate. It was well cared for over the decades.

    Both my Granddad and Dad used it, mainly in the fields and woodlands of southern Illinois. It took a lot of squirrels, doves, rabbits, pheasants and grouse. Probably some crows too and possibly a coyote, but I'm not for sure on that.

    Over the last few years, I've used it several times. Mostly in it's intended role as the best upland bird gun ever made, dispatching "Ring-neck" pheasants and, less frequently, doves.

    Frankly, I can't say enough good things about the 16ga. As far loads used, mine were the standard pheasant & dove loads - #4s, #6s & #7s, I believe.

    HTH. :)
     
  13. MrMunster

    MrMunster

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    noway,

    I agree, an ounce of lead is an ounce of lead regardless what gauge bore it comes out of. I should have been clearer in my statement.

    Most of the 12ga guys that are true hunters know how to shoot a bird so that it doesn't get destroyed. Let it flush and fly a little ways before shooting.

    But then there are those 12ga hunters who feel it necessary to gut their birds in flight. You probably know the type -- the ones who think they need #4 3.5" magnums to hunt quail.

    I've been hunting upland game and waterfowl in the midwest for more than 20 years. Most of that time was spent with a 20ga 870 Wingmaster loaded with 7/8oz of #7.5s. Of course, with the move to non-lead shot for waterfowl I did have to go to larger sizes when using steel.

    On the other end of the spectrum, 28ga and .410 (in the wrong hands) can be just as bad. I used to hunt a guys ground whose kids (or grandkids) couldn't shoot very well and insisted on using these small bore shotguns. I routinely had to throw away birds with gangrene whose meat contained shot whose size was consistent with the spent casings they liked to leave on the ground.

    Speaking of which, who else considers it littering to not pick up there empty hulls/brass in the field?
     
  14. noway

    noway

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    Okay now I understand;)

    I agreed that alot of shooters don't shoot worth a damm or use a lot of good common sense, but I wouldn't go as far as to say it's mainly 12ga shooters or 16ga or 20ga or "insert you're ga here"


    One thing for sure, the bigger ga with the larger capacity can help out less adequate shooters who are poor in the technique.


    {Speaking of which, who else considers it littering to not pick up there empty hulls/brass in the field?}

    yes!



    My dad always told me from day one at 12yrs, that a hunter only leaves his/her footprints in the field after the hunt is over. That meant , no trash, no animals parts, no shells,etc.......
     
  15. bbauman

    bbauman Millennium Member

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    Got an Ithica Model 37 Featherlight in 16ga with a full choke. Plan on using it for dove, maybe pheasant too. Will use the 1 oz loads with 6 shot, haven't found the cheap 1oz loads in 7 1/2 or would be using them.
     
  16. MrMunster

    MrMunster

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    And when they do happen to hit a bird in the center of their pattern, what is left is hardly worth cleaning....
     
  17. noway

    noway

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    (curious minds want to know )

    So what kinda bird are you talking about?

    A hummingbird?


    I've shoot mainly small game birds ( dove, but a few quail and rails ) and I have never ever seen a bird scatter into pieces of been destory as to not being able to clean them. Most of these birds are taken at 15 yrds or greater I also never had a bird get very close to my position to become destoryed from one of my typical 1 1/4oz #7.5 field load.

    If they have that kinda of shotgun and shells that are destroying games birds, and are able to get that close to them to do so, then that's a mircale.


    just 0.02c thoughts
     
  18. mpol777

    mpol777 Feral Member

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    This is a huge pet peeve of mine with most of the hunting shows out there. The host(s) will be out hunting ducks or geese and blasting them right in the breast with their 3.5 mags. WTF is the point in that?

    Couple this with the fact that they're blasting some when they are 50 yards up and the birds are falling that far onto a frozen cornfield, there's no meat left. Either the birds are low and they tear out the breast or they're so high that after the bird hits the ground the breast turns into one giant contusion.
     
  19. skfullgun

    skfullgun

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    I have a single barrel, Stevens 16 gauge with cylinder bore that is my favorite shotgun. I can't tell you how many squirrels, rabbits, and doves have fallen to this shotgun. It kicks hard, but it has a mighty reputation for taking rabbits at long ranges during night-time hunts (legal here). I've been offered much money for it when it reapeatdly took standing rabbits at 60-65 yards during a nighttime hunt.
     
  20. paynter2

    paynter2 It ain't over Millennium Member

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    I bought my first 16ga three weeks ago today. A local auction had a couple dozen guns listed. One was a M12 Winchester (1914 manufacture). I'm a real sucker for nickel steele M12s. Especially the 'perch belly' models. Generally speaking, I beleive these go up to about serial number 600,xxx.

    I've shot 20 ga for years - geese in Canada, ducks in Wisconsin, everything in between. I never felt I needed anymore firepower. But, the 16ga M12 at that sale was just beautiful. I have never seen an old model with such deep cut lettering on the barrel. I can't think of a better sign of minimul use than that. I got it for $400. 25inch full choke. It will be hell on grouse this fall.

    There's another M12/16ga/ns at an auction this Saturday. Here we go again...