How long will they last

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Bville-Bud, May 1, 2012.

  1. Bville-Bud

    Bville-Bud

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    How do you think the polymer will hold up after a long while? Dad has a 100+ year old Mauser, will my great grandchild be able to use my Glock, or will it be brittle & crumbling in 100 years?
     
  2. GThirtyTwo

    GThirtyTwo Amor patriae

    Messages:
    359
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Location:
    Martinez, GA
    Considering some Gen 1 and Gen 2 mags are crumbling and cracking, I highly doubt it. The good news would be, assuming Glock is around in 40-60 years, they'll replace the frame under warranty. I think you have a long time before that happens though.
     

  3. Arc Angel

    Arc Angel Deus Vult!

    Messages:
    6,920
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2003
    Location:
    Penn's Woods
    In recent years there have been several interesting threads on this topic. The most persuasive research seems to come from NYC's Museum of Modern Art. The museum has studied plastic deterioration on many of their artifacts. The conclusions? Plastic does deteriorate. A useful life span of 75 to 100 years is reasonable. Perhaps longer if you don't leave your Glock regularly exposed to sunlight; AND if it's color happens to be black. (Carbon in plastic seems to inhibit aging.) From what I've seen with my own Glocks, regularly wiping them down with ordinary mineral oil, or a CLP like Ballistol, seems to rejuvenate the polymer.
     
  4. bam1131

    bam1131

    Messages:
    504
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2012
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Have you heard that works or is it just an assumption? I'm just interested so I can try to make my Glock last a long long time.
    Do you think CeraKote would Preserve it or deteriorate it over time?
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2012
  5. DocWills

    DocWills

    Messages:
    527
    Likes Received:
    13
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    I think that 25-50 years ought to be about right. However a round count ought to be a better way. 250,000 over however long it takes.
     
  6. 125K9

    125K9

    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    445
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    East TX for now. Home: Lookout Mtn., AL
    :couch::couch: This is starting to get good.
     
  7. mj9mm

    mj9mm

    Messages:
    10,270
    Likes Received:
    9,923
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2011
    Location:
    WI, i want my Walker back...
    you need to compare good guns to good guns, alot of steel guns have had short lives to
     
  8. SCmasterblaster

    SCmasterblaster G17 carrier since 1989 Millennium Member

    Messages:
    21,060
    Likes Received:
    1,909
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 1999
    Location:
    Hartford, Vermont
    My G17 has lasted since 1989 - 18 years is not that long, I know.
     
  9. truetopath

    truetopath

    Messages:
    681
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2011
    Location:
    NY
    Interesting thread, I have a funny feeling my Glock will easily outlive me though.
     
  10. Bville-Bud

    Bville-Bud

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    Thanks for your thoughts. My guess is similar, one generation.
     
  11. ronin.45

    ronin.45

    Messages:
    14,338
    Likes Received:
    4,885
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Location:
    NE OHIO
    It'll last longer than you'll need to worry about. I got my first Glock when I was 21, I have no doubt it'll outlast me.
     
  12. Pier23

    Pier23 Silver Member

    Messages:
    4,818
    Likes Received:
    823
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2012
    IMHO, unless you view it as a C&R I dont see the wisdom behind using a weapon of that age.

    These things have to withstand a lot of pressure. Turning my non-existant grandkids loose on a 50-60 year old weapon is not a great idea to me...of course depending how one felt about the grandkids...
     
  13. Bville-Bud

    Bville-Bud

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    I see your point, but don't completely agree. Dad's Mauser shoots just fine!

    I'm a little extreme on the subject, but feel that firearms don't just protect the current owner, they guarantee freedom for generations of Americans to come; hate to think that if some laws change, and evil people just wait, the tools to protect those freedoms will no longer work.
     
  14. handyandy

    handyandy

    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    Location:
    Barrington, IL
    So I shouldn't let my kids shoot my 1942 Springfield Armory M1 Garand? How about a 1917 Colt 1911? My favorite pistol is a 1943 Remington Rand 1911A1. I have felt something very special went I shot Colts and Winchesters that were 100+ years old. The Mauser action is hardly a weak one. I think you need to explore, appreciate and yes...even shoot some historical firearms.

     
    Last edited: May 1, 2012
  15. scosgt

    scosgt

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Plastic does not rust, and it won't wear since there are basically no moving parts touching the plastic.
    It might last just about forever.
     
  16. larson1122

    larson1122

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2012
    Location:
    Minnesota
    :headscratch:
     
  17. Arc Angel

    Arc Angel Deus Vult!

    Messages:
    6,920
    Likes Received:
    22
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2003
    Location:
    Penn's Woods
    Are you asking about mineral oil? If so, I wouldn't exactly call my reasoning an assumption. I've been cleaning with mineral oil and Ballistol for many years, now. I've, also, had other people handle my Glocks and ask me what I use on them. I'm able to tell you this with certainty: There's nothing dry or brittle about my frames; and they're very smooth - not oily - to the touch.

    I think you might benefit from reading that article about Plastics from the Museum of Modern Art. I'm going to try to find it for you. ......

    Found this:

    http://www.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/obj/irc/doc/pubs/nrcc18642/nrcc18642.pdf

    Which indicates that: specific wavelengths of light, chemical oxidation, as well as the presence of heat, and water - all - have negative effects on polymer. This article references an aging polymer leaching off certain chemical fluids as the surface becomes cracked and brittle. There is an implication that polymer absorbs both heat and water - Both with deleterious consequences. Unfortunately this article is silent about what chemicals might rejuvenate polymer.

    Neither do I know exactly what might work to preserve polymer; but, in my above reply, I've stated what seems to work. THAT is the best I can do for you. Then there's this:

    http://mmics.files.wordpress.com/2008/04/problem-plastics-check-list.pdf

    Which indicates that Glock polymer's two greatest wear factors are brittleness and warping. One sort of, 'loss of plasticizer' or another is mentioned. Well, so far, I haven't found the specific article I mentioned; but, I did find this:

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/masy.200650610/abstract

    It indicates that as a plastic ages it tends to acidify. As far as I'm concerned the application of many oils should be able to work to slow down the process of chemical degradation in plastic - specifically in polymers.

    Two things, also, standout: One is to keep your Glock frame as protected from sunlight as possible. The other is to avoid exposing your Glock to either prolonged or excess heat - especially, 'wet heat'. (You know, like doing something incredibly stupid - and, 'very internet' - such as cleaning a Glock in a dishwasher.)

    Here, just found this:

    http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/mome/hd_mome.htm

    Finally, there are these comments from GT's own MarkCO:

    http://www.glockfaq.com/content.aspx?ckey=Glock_FAQ_General_Glock_Info#polymer

    If you're genuinely interested in this subject the above information should keep you busy for awhile. (It did me!) ;)
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2012
  18. Bville-Bud

    Bville-Bud

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2012
    GREAT info, thanks ARC!
     
  19. bcj128

    bcj128

    Messages:
    1,056
    Likes Received:
    298
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    Location:
    La La Land
    I have a G19 whose frame was duracoated (no heat needed). Would that help protect the polymer. Also, I wonder what Frog Lube would do for the polymer. It's pretty nice stuff...

    All this makes me glad I still have my stainless Colt Combat Commander.
     
  20. ChiefWPD

    ChiefWPD

    Messages:
    5,728
    Likes Received:
    5,453
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2004
    Interesting thread on a subject I'd never given much thought to before. With no hard data available, I won't even try at a guess as to how long a Glock frame will last.

    I will add that my first gun was a Remington Nylon 66, bought in the early 1960s. I still own it and it works just fine (looks "new"). Let me state that the little rifle is kept indoors and not abused. None the less, the material it's made of appears to my eye to be inert.

    :wavey:
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2012