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How dumb can I be?!?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Tennessee Slim, Aug 1, 2004.

  1. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    What’s the dumbest thing you’ve ever done flying ...and lived to tell about it? Didja ever forget to put the dip stick back in? Leave a seat belt buckle hanging outside a door? Land at the wrong airfield? On the wrong runway? Forget to pull your gear up? How ‘bout belly-flop a retrac?

    My first trip to the upper Midwest, I got so far out over Lake Michigan (I had no idea it was that enormous) while VFR on top that if my engine had puked I couldn't have made landfall with a 60 knot tail wind. And I didn't pack my life preserver or my hip waders.
     
  2. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    I never, ever did anything dumb connected with flying.

    Well, nothing that they could bring charges against me for.;Q


    Well, nothing that I got caught doing that they could bring charges against me for.;)


    If you haven't seen this, take your pick.:)

    http://www.glocktalk.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=208088
     

  3. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    I have never gone from laughing hysterically to sucking wind through my teeth and back so fast so many times in succession. Uncle M2, I'm sorry to gear you've had such a pedestrian life. ;)

    Man, I'm exhausted. I need a nap.
     
  4. fabricator

    fabricator Got Biodiesel?

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    He,he,he, I'm not a pilot but you would not believe how many people we get around here on lake Mi that say, "wow, how come I cant see the other side?" Well, because it is almost 80 miles to the other side form here. :)
     
  5. MarcDW

    MarcDW MDW Guns Millennium Member

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    I had the dip stick with a R22.
    But my CFI took it out and left it out and I did not see it (but didn't double check either!).
    When I landed again it was laying right in front of me on the ground and I was thinking, that this can't be!!!
     
  6. 40Cal

    40Cal Modurbator

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    I'll just say it involved Victor Airway 601 (South Florida - Key West) and a Cessna 152.
     
  7. MarcDW

    MarcDW MDW Guns Millennium Member

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    Don't tell me you hit the wire!?
     
  8. 40Cal

    40Cal Modurbator

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    Nope. I'm guessing I wouldn't be here to talk about it if that happened.
     
  9. Mass10mm

    Mass10mm Armed Yankee

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    I've done more than a few dumb things in my 10 years of flying, so I'll post just one.

    I wanted to go on a sightseeing trip with an old college buddy in a rented Cessna 152 (rated cargo capacity is about 375 lbs). He was a big guy in college, but as the years went on, he just kept getting bigger. The first sign that something was amiss was when he couldn't get his seat belt closed - it was six inches too short. Still, I took the active runway, pushed the throttle to the stop, and we accelerated down the runway. At around 65 knots I pulled back on the control wheel, but instead of lifting off, the plane just kept barrelling down the runway with the stall horn blaring. Stupidly, I pushed the wheel back and kept going. Eventually, at around 90 knots, with little more than 500 feet of runway remaining, the little bird ever so slowly groaned off the field and took to the air. Retrospectively, we were probably 200 lbs over the maximum weight limit. Fortunately, I decided to do a fast landing, putting the wheels on the tarmac at around 85 knots and used the whole runway to decelerate. Fate was kind to us that day.
     
  10. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    Mass, Your post reminded me of one when I was still a FW student.

    I was flying a Piper Colt, just wandering around so I thought I'd go land at Friendship International Airport (Baltimore, MD).
    I landed, taxied back and was number 2 for TO behind, I think a 707 (1960 was a long time ago:) )

    The big bird takes off and the tower clears me to take off.

    You can see it coming can't you.;Q

    So I do a normal take off but the Colt doesn't leave the ground. So more speed and the Colt still won't fly and is drifting to the side of that WIDE runway and I can't stop it.
    More speed, I don't think that Colt flew that fast off the ground, and I'm real close to running off the side of the runway.

    So I snatch the wheel back and the Colt breaks ground, rocks hard right and left a couple times then settles into a normal climb.

    I make a mental note to tell my instructor about the incident but a couple days later I saw a big article in one of the flying magazines about this "new" problem, wake turbulence.

    Seems a family was killed in their Beechcraft when taking off behind a big bird.
     
  11. BillCola

    BillCola Supreme Cmdr ®

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    Uh huh... :) :)

    I'll get back in this thread after I do a little research on the statute of limitations...
     
  12. Nicolai

    Nicolai

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    I know of one guy who miscalculated how much fuel he was going to need. He ran out of fuel on final approach and crashed his Beachcraft Queen Air just just before the runway, in the next town over (Winder, Ga). I hear he broke his back, but a friend of mine said he was doing good now.
     
  13. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    Speaking of having more luck than you deserve, I know of two aviation mishaps where the ‘pilot’ did something stupid beyond all belief but lived to tell the tale. The first is probably one you’re heard of, Lounge Chair Larry (an Honorable Mention in the Darwin Awards).

    But have you ever heard the one about the guy who fell asleep en route to Crossville, Tenn., and woke up over the Gulf of Mexico??....
     
  14. BillCola

    BillCola Supreme Cmdr ®

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    Heh heh...the times I have pondered that one, I eperienced extreme shrinkage. ;f
     
  15. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    I may have posted this someplace else but,

    I fell asleep while a 2 hour helicopter student had the controls trying to hover.

    A flight comander beat that.

    He was giving a student a "prog ride" (an elimination check ride).
    He fell asleep as the student entered a straight in autorotation.
    He woke up on the first bounce.;f
     
  16. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    When I was in Honduras, we flew 5-hour missions on autopilot by law (EW mission). Boring holes for 5 hours was so, ...uh, ...boring, the unwritten rule was that whoever fell asleep first got to stay asleep. Anyway, all the other guy had to do was twist one knob on the autopilot, monkey with the throttles and answer an occasional radio call. I logged, I dunno, maybe 50 hours ...sound asleep. Hell, I’ve got certificated combat flight time ...in a King Air ...sound asleep.

    -- Break --
    The embellishment came from hangar talk but the big pieces of this story all came from the NTSB’s data base.

    The pilot was the Springfield Ky FBO, an ATP whose medical probably was on its last legs. He comes in ragged out from a long trip to find his Seminole, which had been being refurbed and naturally was 6 months overdue, is finally ready to roll. Juiced over his purdy new toy, he climbs in to buzz down to Crossville, only 1:15 away, to show it off to his FBO buddy there. Along the way he nods off.

    When he wakes up, he’s shocked that all he can see is water. After a couple of 360s convince him there’s nothing but water anywhere, he dials up 121.5 a hollers mayday. ATC answers and tells him to squawk blah-blah-blah and ident. Imagine the shock when ATC says, “Seneca 1247 Tango, I have you two one zero miles south of Panama City, Florida. Say souls on board and fuel remaining.”

    He’d flown so far south over the gulf that the closest landfall was St. Petersburg so they gave him vectors to the east and dispatched a USCG copter to fish him out. He was still 70 miles offshore when he bingoed. He only did two things right all day. One was hollering mayday. The other was not killing himself when he ditched.

    The plane was never recovered. I also hear he didn’t have insurance on it. I also also hear he had his ticket pulled because of this.

    Can you imagine the panic? He wasn’t going within 450 miles of the ocean but, when he woke up, he was so far offshore, he couldn’t even see the coast line. You wake up with no freakin’ idea where you are, all you know is you’re over water. “Dale Hollow Lake? No, it ain’t this big.” Then ATC tells you you’re more than 600 miles beyond your intended destination. And there’s not enough fuel to get to shore.

    I just can’t imagine. And he somehow managed to fly a distance almost identical to the Seneca's published maximum range ...in his sleep!