How are attitudes towards firearms different now from when you were a kid?

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by PlayboyPenguin, Mar 31, 2010.

  1. PlayboyPenguin

    PlayboyPenguin

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    It is surprising to me how attitudes towards firearms has changed from when I was a kid. I am only 43 (I know that is surprising...most of you see the pics of myself I post here and you think to yourself "23 year old underwear model") and things are so different now.

    When I was a kid all kids played with toy guns. They even sold girl versions of the cowboy pistol and rifle sets. I know my sister and I both had our complete outfits. Cap guns were the major toy. First those paper roll caps and then the plastic ones. I used to save every dime I could to afford a weekends worth of "ammo." We even had toy machine guns my grandfather made us out of wood.

    Also when I was young parents actually taught their kids about guns. You can see in the pic I use as my avatar how young I was when my grandmother was showing me how to hold and shoot a rifle.

    Even schools were more tolerant of guns. We used to take our hunting rifles to school with us on the school bus during deer season. The driver would just check to make sure they were unloaded when we got on and then we would check them in with the principal's office when we got to school. he would store them during class time and give them back to us when our parents picked us up to go hunting.

    What differences do you see today?

    Me all "cowboy'd up"
    [​IMG]

    Me and my grandmother
    [​IMG]
     
  2. lawandorder

    lawandorder

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    Same thing for me, we would take our shotguns or .22s to school with us on our motorcycles (late 1960s) and store them in our lockers and go hunting after school.

    Obviously that sort of behavior is not around today.

    I think somewhere along the way the Heroes, of older generations who were good guys and wore white hats became bad guys who wore black hats for younger gens.

    There is a much more marked trend, IMO, toward folks who never had anything to do with guns now realizing they need one for protection.

    It is a good thing that more people are accepting firearms, the causes of that trend are not a good thing.
     

  3. G36's Rule

    G36's Rule Senior Member

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    What is different? When I was a young fella we would laugh at and ridicule the persons who were afraid of guns.

    Now we have to deal with them as politicians....
     
  4. Gokyo

    Gokyo

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    When I was growing up in the 1970's firearms were absolutely forbidden.

    Now I own a bunch. My sister owns half dozen, my dad wons half a dozen and my brother owns a couple.

    However my other sister is still in the "guns are forbidden in my house" camp. But she has a girly husband. Despite the fact that he has no testicles he was still able to sire 2 children.

    So the gun world has really imporved for me in the last 40 or so years.
     
  5. BlayGlock

    BlayGlock

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    I am 25 and grew up in rural south Arkansas. Like you said hunting and guns were routine until the Jonesboro, AR school shootings. I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing when I heard the news (playing basketball with some friends). I think that it was after that that firearms started being more verboten.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2010
  6. smokin762

    smokin762

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    In my family firearms are just parts of our lives. Both sides of the family are just fine with them.

    My dad was born and raised in a poor Coal Mining town in Pennsylvania. Firearms were used on a daily basis to put food on the table.

    My mom was born and raised on a farm in Georgia. Firearms were used to hunt with and to keep away two and four legged pests.

    I started out with cap guns then went to BB guns. By the time I was 13 years old I took a hunter’s safety course and I moved on to the real thing.

    The only thing that I can say that has changed about how I feel about firearms of my past and present is the role they play in my life.

    I do not hunt anymore so, I sold off my hunting rifles and handguns and replaced them with rifles and handguns that are more geared towards self-defense and target shooting.
     
  7. pakettle

    pakettle

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    When I was in high school the local junior rifle club held target shoots in the school gym using 22 caliber target rifles, our principal was in charge of the club. Try that one today!
    Oh I loved those 1950s.
     
  8. 1gewehr

    1gewehr

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    My grandfather taught me to shoot .22s at the dump on Hilton Head Island. When I was old enough (10) and he was satisfied I knew what I was doing, he loaned me his Remington M121 and gave me a couple of boxes of .22lr and left me to kill the rats at the dump. When I had used up all my ammo, I would just walk back to their house (1/2 mile) by myself with the rifle over my shoulder. Nobody ever gave it a second thought.
    A couple of years later he taught me to shoot skeet with his Remington M11 20ga. By that time, there was a small skeet club a mile or so away. I was given access to his gun cabinet and allowed to take the shotgun or .22 and ammo to go shooting as I liked.

    In my Junior High years, I lived just outside the Charlotte, NC City limits. My friends and I would often go shooting in the woods nearby with our .22s. The only restriction was that I had to buy my own ammo, and I had to ask permission to use my rifle (Rossi M62 copy of Winchester pump). We rode bikes with the rifles slung all through the neighborhood and I never heard anyone complain or indicate that this was unusual behavior for kids.

    In the late '70's I was on the state High-Power Rifle Team. I was issued a M14 rifle with the selector removed, and 100rds of Match ammo per month. I became an FFL as 100rds/month was barely enough to shoot the matches with, and not enough for practice. In those days you had to be an FFL to buy ammo by mail. (That changed in 1986) I kept the rifle in a closet at home, and sometimes rode my motorcycle to matches with the rifle slung across my back in a gunsock.

    So, yes, I've seen a major shift in public reaction to firearms being openly carried and used in public. These days, most people think all guns are registered, freak out at the sight of a person carrying a firearm, and believe what they see on TV.
     
  9. Cheseldine

    Cheseldine Texan

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    I'm only 20 now but I played with toy guns and owed bb guns from a very eary age. We had an empty lot full of woods beside our house that we had cap gun wars in, and the general mood in the neighborhood turned against guns as soon as the Columbine shooting happened.
     
  10. waynokarider01

    waynokarider01

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    I guess that you need to take into account where you live. I live in a rural area, although I work in the city. We all grew up shooting, so all my friends have always had guns. I can't really think of anyone I know who is anti-gun. At my job, we have all had background checks, so we likely have a higher than average percentage of law abiding citizens. It actually amazes me at how many of my co-workers posess concealed handgun licenses. One of my friends is licensed to teach the course, and I set up and host classes at my place for him. Probably 4 or 5 times each week, I get people asking when he is going to be coming out to teach the next class. Most of the people I know either have a license, or want to get it. My father in law could care less about guns, which is reallly odd since he is retired military. He just bought a new Glock 22 last week, though. I would say that gun ownership here is more popular and open than in the past.
     
  11. F_G

    F_G

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    I'm 49 and used to take my 870 to school in the trunk of my car ('66 Fairlane GTA:supergrin:) or behind the seat of my uber cool '64 Ranchero:upeyes: and do a little dove hunting when the academic portion of my day was finished. I shudder at the thought of attempting that in today's climate.
     
  12. Glock-it-to-me

    Glock-it-to-me Catching liars

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    Go ask Alice, I think she'll know
    I remember comparing deer rifles with the principal in my high school parking lot.

    In the mid 60's, we would walk down the street with a BB gun and the cops would wave as they drove by.

    I bought .22 ammo at the hardware store at age 11. They would call my house to verify it was OK with my parents.

    At age 12, I bought a shotgun from a neighbor (he called my folks to see if they knew)
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2010
  13. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    When I was young (I'm 72) the attitude about a LOT of things was different from today.

    Guns were a normal thing when I was young.
    The kid's hero's were soldiers, like Audie Murphy, who was fighting the Nazi and the Lone Ranger who fought the bad guys and the Police who were fighting the gangsters. All these heroes fought the good fight using guns.

    Guns were not bad. Some bad people used guns and were stopped by good people with guns.

    Guns could be bought mail order from magazine ads. Even the government sold guns to individuals and the Post Office delivered the guns to your house.
    Now the government would/will disarm us when they can get away with it.

    And isn't it strange that when almost everyone had guns and easy access to guns there was no such thing as school shootings and the like?

    Many young boys brought their cap guns to school to play "Cops and Robbers" at recess. Now this silly society we have become will suspend a young boy from school for pointing his finger or drawing a picture of a gun.
    The schools now are doing their best to brainwash the kids into thinking all guns and those that use them are bad, and they are succeeding.:steamed:

    The attitude toward guns is just one example of how low the country has sunk.
     
  14. OJ

    OJ Deceased Millennium Member

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    If you could afford a gun (and ammo) in those depression days, you were expected to have one -

    I admit, we lived WAY out int he country - Sandhills of Nebraska - and there weren't many other ways to spend money on recreation - as well as varmint control.

    This is me in about 1934 with my 22 single shot rifle I got for my 6th birthday in 1932 - with my trophies - pic taken by proud dad. By then, I could hunt without supervision except for my dog who was always with me (still haven't had one AD/ND) and carrying a rifle in public didn't draw much attention - what attention it draw did was positive.

    [​IMG]

    Times have really changed - though I suspect attitudes out in rural areas have changed less than urban areas.

    :wavey:
     
  15. 8-Ball

    8-Ball Old Soul

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    That's the truth.

    My nephews (grade school) still draw pictures of guns in school, are excused from school for hunting, etc. The 1st and 3rd grade teachers have mounted deer heads, wild boar, and coyotes on the classroom walls.

    My 6 year old nephew took a pocket full of empty .22 shells to school for show and tell after he shot his new rifle for the first time. That was less than a year ago.

    I like to stay away from anything that can be called a city.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2010
  16. Cherokee Bob

    Cherokee Bob

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    I'm a reservation born and raised Native American and had the very good luck to grow up with guns as an integral part of my life. Everyone hunted, we had no law enforcement to speak of and so almost everyone had guns at home as well as in their vehicles. Guns were regarded as tools necessary for a normal life and there was certainly no stigma in owning or using them. I'm 48 and am shocked at how firearms and their owners have been demonized and portrayed as dangerous and backwards.
    Several years ago I brought a woman from Boston home to the rez to meet my family; she was so upset to walk into my grandparent's home and see a rifle and shotgun hanging over the fireplace. She launched into a loud and very rude diatribe about gun ownership until my grandfather silenced her by saying "Well, what are you supposed to do if you need to kill a fellow?" On the drive back to the airport to drop her off I had to explain that as a teenager my grandfather had tracked two rustlers who had stolen some of his stock to a nearby town, found them at the stockyard, confronted them about the stolen cattle and then shot them both dead when they pulled pistols. I put her on the plane and never spoke to her again.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2010
  17. emt1581

    emt1581 Curious Member

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    As a kid I don't think any of us really know what self defense or ccw means....yet I NEVER left the house without my little black snub nose revolver with the stainless cylinder...rarely could afford caps for it but I ALWAYS had the gun on me! No little orange tip either!

    Now, most toy stores won't sell anything that even remotely looks like a gun. I know that is Toys R Us' policy because I wanted to buy my nephew a cap gun there.

    I think it's sickening how guns have been targeted to excuse people from their behavior! But along with the rest of the idiots in society, I blame the parents! The overprotective ones are almost as bad as the absent ones.

    Hell, back in the 20's I'm pretty sure you could mail order a machine gun! Never heard about any kids taking them to school and mowing down their classmates at recess.

    But society has changed. Along with the constant need to blame others for our own behavior, we've been educated that guns are bad. Hell, when I was in high school, EVERY school around here had their own rifle team. I captained mine! Now, there might be a few in the region but one by one they are shutting them down. Gotta cut funding somewhere to provide for the cup stackers!! :upeyes:

    Yes, things have certainly changed, and at an alarming rate to!

    -Emt1581
     
  18. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    Great story.:)


    I know some of you are old enough to remember going into the little corner grocery store where the owner would sell you a half box of 22 Longs and two shotgun shells, because only the "rich folks" could buy a whole box of bullets.
     
  19. Omaha-BeenGlockin

    Omaha-BeenGlockin

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    When I was a kid---

    K-mart had a mini gun store in the store and even took trade-ins

    Sears--JC Penny's--Walgreens all sold guns---even the Holiday gas station sold guns into the '80's.

    Me and my friends all had .22's--and drew no attn from LE from our daily "hunts"---there was a ROTC shooting range in the basement of the junior high.
     
  20. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    About 1962 there was a company sponsored gun club at work. A company that did secret satellite and missile projects for the military and government.
    There was a shooting trophy display case in one of the main hallways.

    At least one of the employees was a part time FFL.
    Another employee would work on employee's guns in the company machine shop.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2010