hot sauce

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by michael88, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. michael88

    michael88

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    Im looking to make some home made hot sauce tonight, does anyone have any good recipes they would like to share? from the net reseach ive done it all seems to be guess work. i woudl like to learn from your experience por favor.
     
  2. tadbart

    tadbart duuuuude.

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    aw man. i had some homemade hotsauce that i forgot about in the back of the fridge. tabasco peppers lightly baked, crushed, mashed with salt, and covered in white vinegar. i opened the vat up (it had been about 4 months), and gassed the entire house. the wife came home a few hours later, and even though i had opened all the window, her eyes still teared up. i no mess wit hotsoss no mo.
     

  3. michael88

    michael88

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    not exactly the advice i was looking for, but dually noted lol.
     
  4. dubyah

    dubyah .-. .- -- -...O

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    This really depends on if you want a Tabasco type sauce, jalapeno type sauce (jalapeno jelly is great!) or something exotic. If you LIKE heat something fresh with Habaneros is great! Fresh fruit in hot sauce is good. Depends on what you are using it on. This would be good on chicken or fish or chips or cheese...

    Mango Habanero Hot Sauce

    1 tablespoon Oil
    4 mangos peeled / diced
    1/4 cup onion chopped
    1 or 2 or + Habanero Chile(chilies)
    1/4 cup Lemon Juice
    bit of sugar, salt and pepper
    vinegar

    Heat oil in a small pan, add mangos, onions, and habanero chile(ies). Cook until onions are soft - translucent. Add lemon juice and sugar, stirring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool, blend in until smooth. Season with salt and pepper and vinegar. You could also not blend it and have a good Habanero salsa. For some reason Habaneros go good with the sweetness of many fruits. If you like to see your peppers in your salsa add some diced jalapenos or other.

    Good luck with your heat!
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010
  5. MtBaldy

    MtBaldy Obie Wan, RIP

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    I love this stuff. You used to be able to order a commercial version but the company went out of business. In St. Croix I put it on hamburgers, chicken, fish, basically whatever. They claim it's very hot but I never thought it was that hot. I'll warn you though people that know me never believe me when I say something is not hot.

    Home Style Inner Beauty Hot Sauce


    12 fresh habanero chiles -- roughly chopped
    1 ripe mango -- peel, pit, mash
    1 cup cheap yellow prepared mustard
    1/4 cup brown sugar -- packed
    1/4 cup white vinegar
    1 tablespoon prepared curry powder
    1 tablespoon ground cumin
    1 tablespoon chili powder
    salt and freshly cracked black pepper -- to taste
    This style of hot sauce, widely used in the West Indies, is basically habanero peppers (also known as Scotch Bonnets), fruit, and yellow mustard, with a few other ingredients thrown in. Use this recipe as a guideline. Habaneros are at the top of the chile pepper heat scale, so feel free to substitute other peppers of your choice. Funnel the sauce into an old pint liquor bottle, then let your imagination run free as to what whopper you can lay on your guests regarding its origins. If you're having trouble, here's a start: "One day in Jamaica I was in this dingy bar and met this old guy who..." and you take it from there. Mix all the ingredients together and stand back. This will keep, covered and refrigerated, until the year 2018. Be careful, though: If it spills, it will eat a hole in your refrigerator. If you ever want to dispose of it, call the local toxic waste specialists. WARNING: Hottest sauce in North America. Use this to enhance dull and boring food. Keep away from pets, open flames, unsupervised children, and bad advice. This is not a toy. This is serious. Stand up straight, sit right, and stop mumbling. Be careful not to rub your nose, eyes, or mouth while working with habaneros. You may actually want to wear rubber gloves while chopping and mixing -- these babies are powerful.

    Edit: I should add, because I thought it was already in the recipe, I fix this in a food processor. Cut the stems off the habaneros and then puree them. Add the rest of the ingredients and pulse to mix thoroughly then pour into a bottle. If you've never handled them before, they're not kidding about the habaneros.
     
  6. Glockerel

    Glockerel Got Mojo?

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    No problem!
    All you need is habaneros, Kosher Salt and White Vinegar.
    Wash, de-stem, and coarsely chop the habanero chiles. Using an appropriate size glass jar, sprinkle about 1/2 teaspoon salt on the bottom of the jar. Add a layer (about 3/8 to 1/2 inch thick) of the chopped habaneros and sprinkle generously with coarse salt. Add another similar layer of chopped habaneros and salt. Continue in this manner until all the chopped chiles have been placed in the jar. Sprinkle some salt on top of the last layer of chiles.

    Cover the jar with a piece of folded cheesecloth and secure with a rubber band. Set the jar aside in a cool place for a few days (I usually let it sit about a week) to allow the habaneros to release some of their juice. When a significant amount of juice has formed in the jar (the chiles and liquid might even begin to ferment and bubble a bit), pour white vinegar over the chiles and secure the cheesecloth in place with the rubber band. Set aside as before for a few more days (again, I usually let it sit for about a week), gently shaking each day to stir up the mixture.

    Pour the contents of the jar into a blender and puree until pretty well liquefied**. Strain the liquid into a jar through a fine sieve, pressing against the sieve with a spoon to force as much pulp through as possible. Set the liquid in a refrigerator where it will be least disturbed until a layer of clear vinegar forms on the top. Gently pour off the clear liquid and reserve. Repeat this process until no more vinegar can be poured off. Bottle the remaining sauce and keep in the refrigerator for "Tabasco Sauce" type uses.

    ** when you do this, be careful!! Between any liquid splash and the fumes, you are really playing with fire in this step!
     
  7. dubyah

    dubyah .-. .- -- -...O

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    Baldy's recipe sounds good. I like the Habaner/Mango ratio!
    The curry powder would be good in it also. I will try a variation of this.
    Good question michael88

    Edit: a lot of hot sauce recipes also use carrots - cooking up carrots and or fruit/tomatoes, lime juice and or vinegar, habanero or other peppers, onions, salt to make sauces.

    Edit: Saw this one after I typed. Glockerel's sauce sounds good. Sounds similar to the way they make Tabasco but with a nice kick and flavor!
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010
  8. michael88

    michael88

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    are there any ready tonight recipes? or is waiting a significant part of the process?
     
  9. MtBaldy

    MtBaldy Obie Wan, RIP

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    Mine is ready when you bottle it. It lasts for a couple of months refrigerated but since it's not cooked it will go bad eventually.