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hose too long?

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by FireForged, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. FireForged

    FireForged Millenium #3936 Millennium Member

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    Ok explain me this:

    I am watering a couple of trees in the back 40 of my property and my neighbor leans over the fense and says "hey.. if you run too many of those water hoses together, you will cause excess pressure on your water lines.. it may cause a leak in your crawlspace".

    I just kinda waved and said "ok good to know".. A few minutes later he says.. "really, you have too many hoses connected".

    After I was finished I was kinda thinking how running (2) 75foot hoses creates any more pressure than (1) 75foot hose. I would think that a spray nozzle would cause more pressure than just a open water hose, no matter how many you run together.

    My house has a pressure reg on this inlet pipe that feeds all the other water lines which doesnt really have anything to do with this situation i guess. Someone please tell me what my neighbor is talking about. Or is he crazy...
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  2. RonS

    RonS Millennium Member

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    The only thing I can think of is that if you connect a bunch of hoses, fill them, then shut them off with spray nozzles at the far ends and leave them lay the sun will heat the water and increase the pressure in the hoses. I have had an old weak hose split when I left it under pressure in the sun and didn't shut off the tap.

    Maybe the guy had a weak connection in his plumbing and blames it on connecting too many hoses. Not everyone is Rabbi.
     

  3. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    Sounds like crap to me. How much pressure is there when you completely shut the faucet off? :rofl:
     
  4. Resqu2

    Resqu2

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    I vote for crazy.
     
  5. TheExplorer

    TheExplorer

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    As they expand my neighborhood, they are increasing the water pressure. I am in the old development, so I would get periodic surges that blew out of my water heater's pressure release valve. I naturally have a pressure regulator as well, but I had to get an expansion tank. However we are talking about hoses here, so isn't that like saying you can't have upstairs and downstairs faucets running at the same time?
     
  6. JLA

    JLA

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    Just my .2 but the longer the hose....the more pressure it takes to force your water out. Think of air. That's why they have to pump it in to these coal mines etc. because you have to use enough pressure to make sure air is getting in. The bigger ...(wider I mean), the opening, the easier to allow water, air to flow.

    Sorry if I didn't make sense or am wrong. Too many :drink:
     
  7. davew83

    davew83 hhhhhhhhmmmmmmm

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    Totally wrong, the longer the hose the less pressure there will be coming out the end. I understand why but I will leave it to Rabbi or DevilDog to explain friction loss and pressure loss in lengths of pipe/hose.
     
  8. el_jewapo

    el_jewapo

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    I'm going with plausible. I'm thinking about having several hoses with all that water and you jerk the hose to clear an obstacle. I suppose it could cause a pretty good burst of back pressure. But yeah, this is the first time I've put any thought into it and I admit, I just pulled that out of my rear.
     
  9. Jonesee

    Jonesee

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    Total hogwash!! Here is why:

    The maximum pressure in your water lines is X. It is at its highest when there is no valve open (faucet etc). That pressure at that moment is determined by the feed from your supply source (the water company as fed through your meter) At that point, at that maximum pressure, your system adequately holds the pressure without leaking.

    No matter how many hoses you string together, the pressure from the supply source will not increase. And for every open valve (indoor fixture or outdoor spigot) the pressure within the household system will be reduced.

    The act of stringing hoses together will not increase the maximum pressure from the supply, and your system is already designed to handle that.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  10. airmotive

    airmotive Tin Kicker

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    The highest the pressure can be in your home's piping is when all the water faucets are shut off. (Ignoring dynamic pressure spikes from shutting off the flow suddenly....but that's an entirely different subject).

    In other words, he's full of it.
     
  11. .264 magnum

    .264 magnum CLM

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    You neighbor is a elwrongo.
     
  12. .264 magnum

    .264 magnum CLM

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    Bingo.
     
  13. .264 magnum

    .264 magnum CLM

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    Bingo II
     
  14. 686Owner

    686Owner NRA Life Member

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    It's true. That's why sky scrapers don't have any plumping above the 7th floor. All those pipes create too much pressure!
     
  15. jellis11

    jellis11 Yippee-ki-yay

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    I think he is calculating the friction loss wrong... And is full of crap lol
     
  16. el_jewapo

    el_jewapo

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    The more I think about this, the more sense it makes to me. I think with enough water, in enough hose, with a sudden jerk, it would be pretty easy to cause a jolt in back pressure exceeding the pressure when the valve is off. Now, how much extra hose and how much water that would take, I have no clue. I don't think most people replying are taking into account jerks on the hose. Of course, the longer the hose, the less pressure if you're not moving it. But I think moving and jerking will cause bursts in pressure.
     
  17. Jonesee

    Jonesee

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    The back pressure will expand the rubber hose before it causes the solid copper or soldered joints to give
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  18. RonS

    RonS Millennium Member

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    I still think the old coot had a joint fail while he happened to have a bunch of hoses hooked up. Nothing will ever change his mind that more hose equals more pressure.
     
  19. G19Tony

    G19Tony Sneet CLM

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    I get told that a lot. :whistling: :tongueout:
     
  20. mooseDan

    mooseDan

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    Okay if I recall a firehose of 1 1/2 150 ft to get 100 psi at nozzle you needed 165 on the pump friction loss and if you went down stairs or downhill (10') gain 10 lbs and every 10' up you lost 10 lbs. A garden hose of 150' at 75 lbs (std house ?) pressure mabey 50 psi and adding another 75 feet 42 psi at the end you cannot increase house pressure so it's all loss pressure borrow all the hose you want. I believe copper pipe is rated at 800 psi.