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Hornady light mag .30-'06

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by cruiserman, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. cruiserman

    cruiserman

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    I'd like to get Hornady light mag ammo in .30-'06 for elk this Fall. Any recommendations for bullet type & size? I expect the shooting range will be 100 to 400 yards. Bullet selections are BTSP, SST, and Interbond. Weights are 150, 165, and 180gr.

    The 165gr ballistics look flatter than 180gr with more energy than 150gr. Not sure about why one bullet type would be better than another.

    Suggestions are appreciated.

    Thx, Eric
     
  2. akbound

    akbound

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    Hi cruiserman,

    I'd be inclined to try the 180 grain bonded bullets first. The additional costs are minimal when compared to the cost of the hunt. And with the additional velocity of the "high energy" loads should still give you great penetration on elk sized animals.

    Good luck on picking your load, and the hunt!

    Dave
     

  3. cruiserman

    cruiserman

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    Thanks for the reply, Dave. I ended up buying regular old 165gr Federal Nosler ballistic tips. I'll just practice more to make up for the lower cost :).
     
  4. muddydog

    muddydog

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    personally i wouldnt use ballistic tips on an ELK..my 2 cents.

    you need a bonded bullet. nosler, grandslam, interbond..
    elk are tough cookies.
     
  5. akbound

    akbound

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    Hi cruiserman,

    Ballistic Tips are great bullets, though generally speaking a little "soft" on really big game. I use ballistic tips for whitetail deer hunting in my .260 Remington. They also tend to be a very accurate bullet in most loads.

    If I needed to use ballistic tips on elk sized game I'd be sure of a shot placement that does NOT require penetrating through heavy bone in order to reach the heart or lungs. Ballistic Tip bullets would probably work great on a broadside shot through the ribcage but I'm not sure I'd trust a 165 grain .30 caliber BT to punch through a shoulder to reach the vitals on a big elk.

    Like muddydog said when I get to game that large I normally use a tougher bullet. But if the BT's and that load shoot well in your .30-06 and you're confident in them, go ahead and use them. Just be careful about placement. Try to avoid heavy bone prior to reaching the heart/lungs, and also avoid trying to drive a heavily quartering angled shot through several feet of elk prior to reaching vitals. The BT's are devastating when slipped through the ribcage broadside, doing massive internal damage. I just don't think I'd trust them to give the kind of penetration you'll get from a tougher partition or bonded bullet.

    Best of luck with the hunt!

    Dave
     
  6. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    I agree with muddydog.You do not want to use a ballistic tip for elk--you need a tougher bullet.You would want to go with a partition,or bonded bullet of some sort--i would go with 180 grain.Elk are bigger and tougher than whitetail deer,and you need the penetration that a heavy bonded bullet will provide. Good luck!!!
     
  7. cruiserman

    cruiserman

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    Thanks for the replies. I read some net material last night and came to the same conclusion as posted. I'm taking the ballistic tips back. I wish Sportsman's had more selection.
     
  8. akbound

    akbound

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    I hate to discourage people, but I honestly think that's the best decision. A good 180 grain "premium bullet", either partition or bonded is probably a sound choice!

    Once again, good luck.

    Dave
     
  9. cruiserman

    cruiserman

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    Comparing the Remington Core-Lokt cartridges, why would I choose the 168gr C-L Ultra over the 165gr standard round? Ballistics are very close, but the Ultras are about $10 more per box.

    I'll probably have a deer tag, too, so I'm hesitant to get 180gr.

    thx, eric
     
  10. akbound

    akbound

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    Hi cruiserman,

    For myself, as a rule of thumb I make my bullet selection based on the toughest requirements it might face, as opposed to the easiest. In your case the "toughest requirement" is the need for a bullet that will both expand and penetrate. A 180 grain, .30 caliber bullet, when placed properly will kill any deer that ever lived. And if properly constructed will also assure appropriate penetration on elk sized animals....."the toughest requirement". A lighter bullet may do likewise, but then again it is more marginal.

    A good example. We lived in Alaska for five years prior to moving back here for personal reasons. (And will soon again be in Alaska!) While there I had many opportunities to go Caribou hunting. When I did I was carrying my .338 Winchester Magnum loaded with 250 grain Nosler Partition bullets. Now I know that caribou do NOT require that kind of load. But I also know that where I was hunting was prime Grizzly country. And I wanted to insure that I had "enough bullet" for my toughest requirement. To shoot through a Grizzly from any angle and still reach the vital organs. (And Brown's are even more of the same, requiring even more penetration. With my selected load and bullet, I had met that requirement. And as a side benefit I had more than enough bullet to kill a number of Caribou. In one case I shot through a young bull from nearly stem to stern. And for all I know, that Partition is still going.

    Why did I choose Partitions. Well, first I've had nothing but good experiences with them. The front of the bullet expands very easily even in little resistance, giving them good terminal results. While the rear portion, behind the partition, never has failed to continue penetrating and reaching the vitals. And if memory serves me I can't honestly remember ever recovering a partition I fired into game. Every single one of them penetrated through and through imparting massive wound trauma to the game on its path. In short, they have never failed me. They always have worked. And they do so predictably and consistently. ALWAYS!

    Personally there is no doubt if I were going on a mixed bag hunt out west and elk were on the menu, I'd be using Nosler Partitions. If of course I had any choice at all. Would I go on the hunt if I couldn't get Partitions? Yes, of course. But depending on what bullet I had to use I would conduct myself accordingly. If I had to use a "soft" bullet I'd only take a broadside shot. I'd hate to be restricted like that (which is why I'm "picky" about my bullets), but I'd not hunt just because of the bullet. And there really are a great number of bullets suitable for the job.

    I've had pretty good success with CoreLokt's over the years. But having said that I've also recovered a few that could have held together just a little more. Of course I've recovered everything I've shot with them. So they do work! But at the same time they are not as predictable as the Partitions. So I don't tempt fate, and I don't hunt tough or heavy game with bullets that "might" hold together and get the job done. I spend a couple bucks more and make sure that if I do my job........so does the bullet!

    Soft bullets for "soft" game. Tough bullets for "tough" game. And if I happen to be in a situation that I might encounter either, I opt for the tough bullet. Because it will work for both.

    I don't think of myself as a "bullet snob" at all. I just know what works for me, instills confidence, and provides the insurance that it will undoubtedly get the job done. That's all I'm trying to say.

    Once again, best of luck.

    Dave
     
  11. muddydog

    muddydog

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    back in 1985...i sound old, when i say that..(i'm only 34)

    i shot a 8pt buck that weighed 102lbs dressed with a corelokt at a range of less around 15 yards, broadside into the front shoulder.

    the bullet desentagrated on initial impact and blew a opening 3 inches in diameter only 1.5 inches deep. basically ruining the whole shoulder and doing NOTHING but stunning the deer.

    i thought i had a great shot with a viscious wound and kept waiting for the deer to DRT..

    it started to get up and when it got 3 legs under it, i shot it in the neck.

    like AKB said..
    think about all the possible scenerios.

    a Corelokt hasnt been used in any of my guns since, due to the fact they dont seem to handle high pressure shots under a certain "range", and obviously <20 yards is in question.


    make sure your loads will handle the stress of any shot you might need.

    i shoot most of my deer within 5-20 yards. sometimes i might get a shot to 40 or so. i have to use bullets that will stand up to muzzle blasting range.
     
  12. cruiserman

    cruiserman

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    Okeedoke. I returned the BTs to Sportsman's and picked up a box of 165gr Fed trophy bonded bear claw and a box of 165gr Win Fail Safes. I also went to Wal-Mart to get a box of core-lokts for sighting in the rifle. Only $11 for that box, but the others were steep. I will probaby also get a box of partitions, and I'm going to see which of the three my rifle likes.

    Thanks again for the comments.
    eric
     
  13. akbound

    akbound

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    Hi cruiserman,

    The Trophy Bonded, Fail Safe, and Partitions are all great hunting projectiles. They can all be counted upon to get the job done when it comes time to terminal performance. And even the 165 grains can be counted on as well with those bullets. They are all great choices!

    One last note, (and I hope you don't think we're being a royal pain in the a**....;) ), if you sight your rifle in with any load other than your hunting load, you will then need to RECHECK YOUR ZERO WITH THE HUNTING LOAD! The reason for this is because frequently different loads, with different bullets, will have different points of impact. And you absolutely must know that before you go hunting.

    I hope all of this information hasn't been an inconvenience. And I really do wish you the best on your upcoming hunt. It really sounds as if you're going about preparation in the right manner!

    Lots of luck!

    Dave
     
  14. cruiserman

    cruiserman

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    Yes, that's the plan :).
     
  15. akbound

    akbound

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    Eric,

    Don't forget to let us know how the hunt goes. Hopefully with pictures! :)

    Dave
     
  16. MrGlock21

    MrGlock21

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