Home Meat Grinders

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by gamboolman, Jan 26, 2020.

  1. gamboolman

    gamboolman

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    We need the help of the forum please.

    ms gamboolgal and I planning to retire this year. Been working for ~42 year in the oilpatch and it's time.

    When we was younger, we ate a lot of deer and game. That was the days before going over sea's. Back in them days we used a Hand Grinder and it was slow and tedious at best.

    We'll be planning to have time to hunt and fish more.

    Home processing of deer and hogs and making ground meat and sausage.

    What are recommendations including attachments.

    Thanks for any advice and assistance.

    gambooman......
     
  2. Beendare

    Beendare Stick and String, SME, NRA life member

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    I have a LEM...3/4 HP I think.

    I do a lot of elk and deer meat....not so much wild hogs but I'm going to start.

    I'm picky about my processing, so when I bone it out I use fresh gloves and keep the meat super clean. One trick is to wrap it right off the animal with a roll of plastic wrap. Gotta get it cold quickly so no bacteria forms. Unwrap in refer.

    I also trim a lot of the silver skin...keeps your grinder from getting bunged up...and tastes better.

    I like mine single grind with no added fat....cook easy with olive oil.

    I tried making sausage with no added fat...bad idea...it tastes like flavored meat. Sausage you have to add fat along with the seasoning.
     
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  3. phonejack

    phonejack

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    Beendare gives good advice. I do the same.
     
  4. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

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    I have a commercial grinder. The larger LEM grinders are OK...more HP is better when you are dealing with game meat. The sinew and other connective tissue WILL collect and wrap around the shaft of the auger. This will cause a lower power machine to clog up--more HP is better also because they heat up less and warm grinders make crappy ground meat. You want to keep the whole thing cold if you can.

    I make lots of cured sausages with deer. Venison pepperoni, sopressata, and salami. I also make cooked sausages like summer sausage and also fresh like breakfast sausage.

    I'm also particular about butchering my deer. In my world the animal is in a cooler to hang within an hour or so of hitting the ground. I usually hang my deer skin on for a week to ten days before I butcher them. I almost always bone the entire carcass into muscle groups. I don't use saws. A good Japanese butcher knife is my tool of choice. Generally takes me about a half an hour to bone out a whole carcass. I put the cuts in restaurant bus bins sorted by end product... Trim, Select cuts like loin and steaks, and a tray for large roasts etc. Once I have the animal boned out I wrap the tops of the bins with plastic wrap and place them in the garage fridge until I can further process them into sausage or serving size cuts and freeze etc. Cured sausages need to hang for about 6 weeks in my basement until they have fermented and lost enough water. Then they can be frozen. I buy ground pig fat from a local game processor in 5# rolls and add it to all my sausages--otherwise---yuck. Most of my large bucks (except for the loins) get made into sausage or stew/chili meat. Smaller does make it to the table in the form of steaks etc.
     
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  5. Tvov

    Tvov

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    What about a large KitchenAid type machine? I have only done meat grinding of pork with it, but the thing is so heavy duty I would be surprised if it had trouble with other meats.

    Also, you have a mixer, bread kneader, etc etc all in one machine.

    And I mean the big one, not cheap, but ours is decades old without a hiccup:

    https://www.amazon.com/KitchenAid-K...1_5?keywords=kitchenaid&qid=1581529106&sr=8-5

    [​IMG]

    And the grinder attachment is around $80. The picture has it attached to the lower end model:

    [​IMG]
     
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  6. Olympus

    Olympus

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    My best friend has a 1hp LEM and that thing is a BEAST! It will grind anything without even the slightly protest. Where we live, we have a large farm and home store that carries a HUGE selection of LEM products and parts, so it's a no-brainer for us to all use LEM stuff. Obviously all brands will make a cheaper line and a more commercial grade line. My advice is to buy the biggest that you can afford.

    That same neighbor bought a Weston vacuum sealer, one of their higher end ones, and that thing is a POS! He's had to put 4 new heating strips on it because they all burn up or go out. Based on his experience, I would not recommend anything by Weston though.
     
  7. SFCSMITH(RET)

    SFCSMITH(RET)

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    I have ground about a dozen deer over the years with a good old LEM Model 10 manual grinder. No complaints, no worries. Takes a bit, and is work. But it works great, and will work as long as I have arms to turn it. She likes me to mix in a little beef fat with the ground venison, I have a cabela's mixer for that. Holds 20 pounds or so, also manual.
     
  8. Big Bird

    Big Bird NRA Life Member

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    If you want to grind a pound of meat from time to time its OK. But forget it for a whole deer. It will overheat and clog and make a mess. You will cuss it and yourself before you are half way through a deer. I speak from having the experience of having owned one and taking it back for a refund (the attachment not the mixer...I love my Kitchenaid mixer BTW)
    If you process deer on a regular basis invest in a good heavy duty grinder like a LEM or look on Ebay/craigslist for used commercial Hobart etc.
     
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  9. yellolab

    yellolab

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    I've used the kitchenaid attachment for years, and it works.....fine. Just VERY slow on how much you can put on the hopper to grind.

    A couple years ago I bought a dedicated grinder from Cabelas. WOW. Shocked just how much faster it was. And how many hours I've wasted using the Kitchenaid.
     
  10. thewitt

    thewitt

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    A 1/2hp grinder is a minimum in my experience. 3/4 is better. Cabelas has some good ones. I have a Wilson & Miller 3000W two-speed unit, but there are many nice ones out there.

    For the occasional sausage, the Kitchenaid works fine, but I burned up a motor doing 150 pounds one season.

    Expensive mistake.

    I recommend a stand alone stuffer as well. I prefer a horizontal one to a vertical one as well as I can work it by myself and still manage the casings.
     
  11. Tvov

    Tvov

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    Yea, that was our experience when we used to make our own pork sausage with the Kitchenaid attachment .... sometimes it seemed like we were spending more time cutting up the meat in small chunks than actually grinding.