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Home made gold/brass dot?

Discussion in 'Sights, Optics and Lasers' started by jaysouth, Feb 14, 2010.

  1. jaysouth

    jaysouth

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    I have a Glock with kimber night sights long gone dim.

    Has anyone ever ever pried out the tritium tube and replaced it with a gold/brass rod?

    I shudder to think that a set of Novak black rear sights with gold bead front is half what I paid for the pistol and almost double the price of new night sights.

    By the way, if you are in the market for night sight, buy Novak or Trijicons. The tubes can be replaced for a nominal amount. kimber/meprolights does not have tubes that can be swapped. You have to replace the whole set, ditto for Siglights.

    Follow the money, kimber nightsights are priced at about 80% of Trijicons but have 50% of the life.
     
  2. SIGShooter

    SIGShooter Hucklebucks

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    No, I have never tried that.

    Of course I highly recommend that you do not do this. You do realize that Tritium is a radioactive material right? Though the Tritium vials a pretty strong, why would you risk breaking one of them open?

    Also, I have never heard of Glock/Kimber Night Sights. Are you referring to the Mepro Light Night Sights?

    The Mepro Light Night Sights do indeed have Tritium tubes. Some companies will replace just the tubes and others will replace the whole sight.
     

  3. Asmodeus6

    Asmodeus6

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    I think you can get replacement vials of tritium loose. I have no idea how you would go about installing them however since they are epoxied in. As for being radioactive... eh... for as much exposure as you would get cracking a vial or 3 maybe twice in a life time. I hardly see you doing any more damage to yourself than standing too close to your microwave to see if your coffee is overflowing. The tritium is a gas in there anyway right? So if you do it outside I can't see it being a BFD.

    My best guess would be to take a properly sized drill bit and just go right through the ampule. However, most have a faux sapphire lens. So that might not be something you can do easily either.

    But if they are too dim to use, I'd give it a go. Why not? What do you have to lose?
     
  4. FARSON

    FARSON

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    did you try cleaning them with alcohol ? - they do get dirty and appear dimmer when they are- alcohol & a q-tip works good for cleaning them - try it before you spend time & $$ on a fix
     
  5. jaysouth

    jaysouth

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    Kimber is the master distributor for Mepro night sights in the USA.

    According to Mepro, the tubes cannot be replaced on their night sights. According to Sig, the tubes cannot be replaced on their propietary Siglights.

    Trijicon replaces their lamps for $18.00 per tube. I had them do this on a Smith 3913 last month. Trijicon will not replace the tubes on Meps because they say they cannot be replaced. Yes, I asked.

    A friend has a drill press. I will get the thing outside on a sunny day and have a go at the front sight. Finding or making a gold rod to fit the cavity should not be a serious problem. I will report back.

    If anyone knows the name of any other company that would work on these things. please post.

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2010
  6. FlyfishermanMike

    FlyfishermanMike

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    You hear Tritium and how it's a byproduct of the thermonuclear process and you get scared. Don't worry about it when the source is small, like a vial in a night sight.

    Should it break: The actual radioactive component in the vial is an isotope of hydrogen, which is much lighter than air; the tiny amount gas would immediately disperse and float away. Even if you were standing directly over a freshly broken vial, odds are the gas would be too dispersed for even a single molecule to reach your breathing space. If the vial were in your hand or pocket - again, it's a radioactive gas and not solid or fluid, it would simply float off and away, no more glow from your vial.

    Worst case scenario: You break the vial on a table/desk, then IMMEDIATELY cup your hands around the vial and place your face directly over it and inhale deeply. If this were to happen, you'd receive as much radiation as ...a dental x-ray.

    That's the beauty of the tritium vial design, rather than relying on the radioactive substance itself to glow, it uses a strong phosphor that glows brightly with very little energy, so you can use a remarkably weak source of radioactivity to produce a glow. The beta radiation that comes off of a tritium vial cannot penetrate tissue paper, and can only make it about a quarter inch from the vial in open air before dissipating. It's so weak that even if you were to set a Geiger Counter on its most sensitive setting, then press the probe directly onto the vial, it would not register a reading at all.


    ^^ike