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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My question is about whether or not to lock interior doors. Basically my front door opens into my living room, my bedroom door is connected to the living room not far from the front door. If someone were to break in at night they really would be just a few steps away from my bed as soon as they stepped in. Locking my bedroom door might buy me a few seconds. However it also creates a situation where I probably have to stay in the room and wait it out if they do break in (unlocking and opening the door will require a free hand and cause noise). I'm the only one who lives there btw.

So what do you guys think about my situation or thoughts in general?
 

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AKA Fluffy316
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Lock your bedroom door. should a break in occur, seek cover and if cover not available, seek concealment.

Call the Police and advise them of your location in the house. Let the Police handle clearing the house and only engage a burglar if they present a threat to you. If you have no one else in the house to protect, look out for yourself and stay put.

Nothing is more dangerous than clearing a house, even if it's your own home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, I was leaning that way but I'm no expert. Good point about how dangerous it is to clear a house, better to put the bad guy in that situation than myself.
 

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AKA Fluffy316
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Thanks, I was leaning that way but I'm no expert. Good point about how dangerous it is to clear a house, better to put the bad guy in that situation than myself.
Exactly! The other thing you need to consider is that once you call the police, they are showing up on the scene and they may not be able to recognize you as Friend or Foe, so it's best to notify them of your position and stick to it.

The scenario can be horribly different if you had kids sleeping down the hall.

Please remember that a mattress is concealment, not cover in most cases.

I have cleared buildings and houses and I'll be a happy man if I never have to do it again. :whistling:
 

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Prime Example
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Lock your bedroom door. should a break in occur, seek cover and if cover not available, seek concealment.

Call the Police and advise them of your location in the house. Let the Police handle clearing the house and only engage a burglar if they present a threat to you. If you have no one else in the house to protect, look out for yourself and stay put.

Nothing is more dangerous than clearing a house, even if it's your own home.
This. Unless you have kids etc to get to, stay put.
 

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Resident Dimwit
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Lock your bedroom door. should a break in occur, seek cover and if cover not available, seek concealment.

Call the Police and advise them of your location in the house. Let the Police handle clearing the house and only engage a burglar if they present a threat to you. If you have no one else in the house to protect, look out for yourself and stay put.

Nothing is more dangerous than clearing a house, even if it's your own home.
This sums it up quite well.
 

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Lock your bedroom door. should a break in occur, seek cover and if cover not available, seek concealment.

Call the Police and advise them of your location in the house. Let the Police handle clearing the house and only engage a burglar if they present a threat to you. If you have no one else in the house to protect, look out for yourself and stay put.

Nothing is more dangerous than clearing a house, even if it's your own home.
Good avice. Direct from the NRA Personal Protection Inside The Home.
 

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Exactly! The other thing you need to consider is that once you call the police, they are showing up on the scene and they may not be able to recognize you as Friend or Foe, so it's best to notify them of your position and stick to it.

The scenario can be horribly different if you had kids sleeping down the hall.

Please remember that a mattress is concealment, not cover in most cases.

I have cleared buildings and houses and I'll be a happy man if I never have to do it again. :whistling:
A bachelor's best friend; :supergrin:



Desert Dawg

Bob :cowboy:
 

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Locking my bedroom door might buy me a few seconds. However it also creates a situation where I probably have to stay in the room and wait it out if they do break in
Which is a good thing to do. FWIW, I don't lock all interior doors, but the bedroom door is locked at night.
 

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Slacked jawed
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This. Unless you have kids etc to get to, stay put.
All my adult life I slept with the bedroom door closed, until I had children. Then I needed to have the door open to hear what they are up to. If you have a family I think it is best to keep the door open.

In retrospect keeping the door closed even if you are single makes you lose out on hearing things that go bump in the night. If you miss hearing that initial break in, you are not going to hear them until they are going thru your bedroom door anyway.
 

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Scottish Member
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My question is about whether or not to lock interior doors. Basically my front door opens into my living room, my bedroom door is connected to the living room not far from the front door. If someone were to break in at night they really would be just a few steps away from my bed as soon as they stepped in. Locking my bedroom door might buy me a few seconds. However it also creates a situation where I probably have to stay in the room and wait it out if they do break in (unlocking and opening the door will require a free hand and cause noise). I'm the only one who lives there btw.

So what do you guys think about my situation or thoughts in general?
I actually have a single-cylinder 1" deadbolt on our bedroom door.

A dog, cellular telephone, 3-D Cell LED Maglight, an alarm panic button remote, a G23 and a 20 ga 870 on my side of the door.
 

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Locking the door is a good idea, but remember, most interior doors are hollow core. One good kick, and they pretty much give.

Years ago, I worked all sorts of off hours. I "hardened" my house working from the perimeter in. Fenced perimeter, lighting, "security" shutters, security screen door, solid doors in steel frames. The idea is to keep them out in the first place. And if they see a "hardened" house, they'll go somewhere else.

Still, anything is possible, so some interior changes were made. The bedroom area is separated from the rest of the house by a long hallway. There was no door on the living room end of the hall. So, a solid door with a dead bolt was installed. And, another solid door with dead bolt was installed on the master, and the kids rooms (you never know where you might be when you need to lock down.

Now here's something to remember. Interior walls are usually just two layers of sheet rock, and maybe some sound proofing material. Any fireman can tell you that you can kick through an interior wall in a couple seconds, and most folks can squeeze right between the frame members. The solution was simple. Pull the sheet rock on one side of the wall, and install thin sheets of "steel", then reinstall the sheet rock.

And, as a last resort, my wife, and kids when ole enough know how to shoot.

Expensive, yes. But, I'd rather spend money securing the house than what a lawyer would cost in the event of a shooting.
 

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Locking the door is a good idea, but remember, most interior doors are hollow core. One good kick, and they pretty much give.

Years ago, I worked all sorts of off hours. I "hardened" my house working from the perimeter in. Fenced perimeter, lighting, "security" shutters, security screen door, solid doors in steel frames. The idea is to keep them out in the first place. And if they see a "hardened" house, they'll go somewhere else.

Still, anything is possible, so some interior changes were made. The bedroom area is separated from the rest of the house by a long hallway. There was no door on the living room end of the hall. So, a solid door with a dead bolt was installed. And, another solid door with dead bolt was installed on the master, and the kids rooms (you never know where you might be when you need to lock down.

Now here's something to remember. Interior walls are usually just two layers of sheet rock, and maybe some sound proofing material. Any fireman can tell you that you can kick through an interior wall in a couple seconds, and most folks can squeeze right between the frame members. The solution was simple. Pull the sheet rock on one side of the wall, and install thin sheets of "steel", then reinstall the sheet rock.

And, as a last resort, my wife, and kids when ole enough know how to shoot.

Expensive, yes. But, I'd rather spend money securing the house than what a lawyer would cost in the event of a shooting.
Good avice. I also recommnd using four-inch screws on the door hinges and striker plate. This sets the door into the actual framing of the house instead of just attaching to the trim or door jamb. Also, Home Depot sells a brace bar that locks in under the door knob for extra strength.
 

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Make your entry door harder or near impossible to get through. Harden your bedroom door also. I changed mine to a solid core, long screws and two dead bolts. Cheap motion alarms can be had for $30. Loaded 12ga by the bed. If you don't wake up to the noise of getting through all that nothing is going to help you.
 

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Sleeping with your bedroom closed can save your life in the event of a home fire. I always insisted that we all sleep with our bedroom doors closed. Fires are a greater risk than burglars/invaders.
 

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Doors are hardened and it is me and my wife in 7500 sq ft over 3 floors with 8 video cameras and wireless alarm reporting system. I have taken 3 Gunfighting courses in the last year and am taking another class next month. I shoot around 5-7,000 rounds each year and have a B class Limited Ranking in USPSA. I am not afraid of home invaders and I am really dangerous out in public with my G-19 and 46 rounds CCW in Georgia. How much do you shoot and take training classes each year?
 
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