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Hiker water filters

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by -, Jan 8, 2003.

  1. Guest

    Well its winter and I am planning my spring trips. Anyone know where I can find a good filter cheap. I am leaning towards the PUR HIKER FILTER. Saw it fo 60.00 on REI. Does anyone know a better place to get it.

    Thanks for looking
     
  2. WFR

    WFR

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    Gander Mountain has the PUR Guide (very similar to Hiker in performance) on clearance for $49.97. Some of them even come with a free Nalgene water bottle ($8 value).
    www.gandermountain.com will help you locate a store but you can't shop from their website.
    I have the PUR Hiker and would feel just as good about using the Guide.
    Hope this helps.
     

  3. MarkCO

    MarkCO CLM Millennium Member

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    I worked in a microbiology group at a major pharmaceutical. Those folks taught me a lot about water. Several of them eventually went to work for the company that makes the Sweet Water filter. I tested quite a few and did the medical research. I'd recomend it. They run about $60.00. I have what is now called the Guardian, it is over 10 years old and still works like new.

    Here is their site... http://www.cascadedesigns.com/sweetwater/
     
  4. Sulaco

    Sulaco Guest

    The PUR Hiker is the best buy for the money. No other filters compare to it for performance, value or size and ease of use. If you do the research, you will see for yourself. I think I paid 45 dollars for mine locally.

    Just remember, none of these filters are purifiers, so boiling standing water is still the safest method. I usually boil standing water, let it sit and cool and then filter it for best results. If it is a fast moving mountain stream or river, I skip the boiling step.

    The safest overall method is to carry in as much water as you can. These days with so much mercury pollution in the form of industrial plants emptying wastewater into rivers and lakes and fertilizer runoff, it is better to be safe than sorry.
     
  5. MarkCO

    MarkCO CLM Millennium Member

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    Are you sure you did the research??? You've reviewed actual lab tests and still come up with that conclusion? You either did minimal research or don't know how to read lab results.
     
  6. jacksonjones

    jacksonjones

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    yup
     
  7. Bruz

    Bruz

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    I used to be "The Culligan Man" in a past life...reverse osmosis is the best system out there for "cleaning" water. Higher temperature of water and higher pressure of forcing the water thru the membrane will generate the highest quality water. I agree it is safer to boil the water (twice) before filtration. Chlorine tablets will take care of most of the organics in the water and is easily filtered with a carbon filter. The more of the aforementioned steps you take the gooder the water will be.
     
  8. Glocktex

    Glocktex

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    I have a water bottle that I sell that you can literally fill from any water source, even in Mexico and the built in filter removes 99.8 % of bacteria, crytosporidia, heavy metal, many other contaminents and the organisms that that cause 'beaver fever'. It is around a 24 oz bottle that you can refill 800 times and the cost is only $50.00. I absoolutely love it. If you want one let me know.

    Glocktex
     
  9. Bruz

    Bruz

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    Glocktex, not questioning your product but if it is just a carbon filter you might want to be carefull useing it in the field. Where carbon filter may remove alot of stuff, it does not remove alot of stuff also. If the water going thru the filter has bacteria in it the bacteria can acually grow in the carbon media. Some carbon filters have additives to take care of the problem. How many microns does it filter?

    When I was selling in the problem water division a salesman acually came into my office selling carbon filter water "purifiers". In his demonstration he put food coloring, sugar, and some other junk in some water, ran it thru his filter, and drank the "purified" water. I asked if he was sure it took "everything" out of the water and he assured me it did. I put about a quarter of a cup of salt in his mixture and told him that his filter would not remove everything. He ran it thru his filter and took one big swallow...his face went
    ;b and when he left my office he looked like this! ;g

    Just don't want anyone to get sick, especially huntin.
     
  10. MoonMan

    MoonMan CLM

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    Do I really want a filter that leaves me with ANY bacteria, even .2%?
     
  11. Glocktex

    Glocktex

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    The bottle filters down to .5 micron.
     
  12. Kayakr

    Kayakr

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    JustACop,

    It all depends on what you are using it for. I have outfitted large groups on backpacking trips and have had experience with almost every product available. As far as the Hiker goes, the handle is very prone to breaking since it is a plastic bicycle type of action. Plus, the paper style filters cannot be cleaned. They just eventually get progressively slower and just stop. My favorite is the MSR MiniWorks II. This is the most durable filter you can buy outside of a Katadihn that costs $200. The MSR retails about $70, but you might be able to find it cheaper somewhere. The miniworks filters down to .2 microns, which zaps giardia. The bottle filters won't get this nasty parasite. You can also scrub the filter when it gets dirty to expose a new layer of ceramic. It has an carbon inner element that gets all chemicals including pesticides and iodine. Also, like all MSR products it is completely field maintainable. The only disadvantate is if it gets below freezing, you need to put it in your sleeping bag over night, so it does not crack.

    Sweet water is good too, but I like the MSR the best. The backpacking goup I outfit for had 6 PUR filters, 3 hikers and 3 guides, all are broken now. 3 years later the MSR replacements are still in good shape. Bottom line, you don't have to pay that much more to get the best available.

    Drink on,

    Kayakr

    ;c
     
  13. Kayakr

    Kayakr

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    P.S.

    No matter what filter you buy, always bring a bottle of iodine tablets when you go into the backcountry. It can save your ***, literally.

    Kayakr
     
  14. Guest

    Filters??? Filters??? We don't need no stinking filters! Real men love the taste of Halizone tablets in their water. Tastes like..... well..... OK, it tastes like crud really.

    Actually, I'll second the PUR Hiker. It's the best deal I've found for the price.
     
  15. smeet5150

    smeet5150 Southern Son

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    I love my PUR Hiker. It has paid for itself many times over in the last three years.
     
  16. WFR

    WFR

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    I just bought 2 more replacement filters for my PUR Hiker so you know my thoughts. I've also used the MSR Miniworks that kayakr recommends and it is a good option. Gander Mountain had the replacement filter cartridges for $14.97 so I'm good to go for awhile.
     
  17. Sulaco

    Sulaco Guest

    Actually, the problem with the Hiker clogging is what makes it work so well. When you can't pump it anymore, you replace the filter.

    I had a Mini and broke the ceramic element twice.

    My Hiker is almost three years old and has been in some pretty tough spots with me and the handle works like new. I even dropped it on a river rock from about 60 or 70 feet one year and when I recovered it, it only had a scratch in the housing and worked perfectly.
     
  18. WFR

    WFR

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    FYI The hiker is now made by Katadyn. They bought out both PUR and Exstream in 2002.
    Basically the same filter as is the Guide but now they are marketed by Katadyn.
    On another note, the MSR MiniWorks has been upgraded and is now called the MiniWorks EX filter and costs $79.95 now.
    And as a final note, Katadyn is now offering Micropur tablets that will kill just about anything in your quart of water and leaves no iodine aftertaste. A 30 pack is $14.
    www.rei.com for further details.
     
  19. Grumpy Gardener

    Grumpy Gardener

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    I have a PUR. It's been on Whitney, Shasta, Desolation Wilderness, local jaunts drinking mud from Spring runoff creeks. I've never had a problem and if I did it was associated to the fact that it had dryed out through the winter. But it's easy to purge it if it does it. I'd go PUR.

    gardener.
     
  20. Guest

    Pur! They make a Purifier cartridge for the hiker.