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I don't even know....what I'm doing here....
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I have a Buck 119 that has mediocre steel (420HC) with top notch heat treat. It’s a good, tough, easy to sharpen knife. But for me, it was almost unusable. Why?

The clip point was begging to be broken off. The guard ran too large, not allowing me to choke up on it. The plastic grip gat way to slippery when wet.

So I reground the tip to a drop point. I ground off the top of the guard, making a more comfy grip. Then I wrapped the grip in sisal, drenched the whole hot mess in epoxy resin, and smoothed it all up.

Since the grip was a little bigger, it wouldn’t fit in the scabbard, so I soaked it down, put the knife in place, and stretched the snap in place to let it dry.

Do you ever make something better for just you?

2EC46315-0ADC-476B-8F20-46DEE8F14321.png 22993AFF-1CD7-498A-8B37-F1FA81039004.jpeg
 

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All the time. Both knives have had a slight radius polished onto what were sharp edges. The bottom one has had the handle ground and polished to better fit my hand. Almost all of my kitchen knives have been modified.

image.jpg
 

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Yes.

I buy cheap $15 Moras. I wish they were still $10.

I drill the handle for a lanyard loop. Sand the red paint Off the handle and smooth and contour the grip a little bit. Then seal it with linseed oil to protect it and give it some grip.

I keep the Scandinavian grind but I polish the grind part of the blade up to 6000 grit for a razor sharp mirror finish edge.

Yes it looks great, but the main reason is it will maintain sharpness for a long time with nothing more than stropping. And stropping on leather with polishing compound will add a slight convex edge to the blade over time, which helps prevent the thin edge from chipping out.

I file the back of the blade to 90 degrees so it can be used to scrape and strike a fire steel.

I squirt the collar where the tang is seated into the handle with wood glue to seal out water from getting trapped inside.

I patina the blade with vinegar, cold blue, mustard, or lemon juice, whatever I have on hand.

Nothing cuts like a Mora. And because they are cheap I can afford to have a really decent knife in both my cars, the boat, the four wheeler, my pack, around my neck etc.....

I’m never without one and usually have a spare as well.

The trend for the last decade has been overbuilt knives with heavy blades that are supposed to do it all. People seem to have forgotten that knives cut by being really thin. Despite being really small, the Mora 2/0 seems to always be the one I grab when heading out. It was around my neck for two days on the river fishing this week. It’s a handy little knife.


She’s still razor sharp, but it’s time to repolish the edge and get it cleaned up again. The steel is so easy and fast to sharpen. A 1200 grit Japanese stone will clean it up in no time.
 

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Yes.

I buy cheap $15 Moras. I wish they were still $10.

I drill the handle for a lanyard loop. Sand the red paint Off the handle and smooth and contour the grip a little bit. Then seal it with linseed oil to protect it and give it some grip.

I keep the Scandinavian grind but I polish the grind part of the blade up to 6000 grit for a razor sharp mirror finish edge.

Yes it looks great, but the main reason is it will maintain sharpness for a long time with nothing more than stropping. And stropping on leather with polishing compound will add a slight convex edge to the blade over time, which helps prevent the thin edge from chipping out.

I file the back of the blade to 90 degrees so it can be used to scrape and strike a fire steel.

I squirt the collar where the tang is seated into the handle with wood glue to seal out water from getting trapped inside.

I patina the blade with vinegar, cold blue, mustard, or lemon juice, whatever I have on hand.

Nothing cuts like a Mora. And because they are cheap I can afford to have a really decent knife in both my cars, the boat, the four wheeler, my pack, around my neck etc.....

I’m never without one and usually have a spare as well.

The trend for the last decade has been overbuilt knives with heavy blades that are supposed to do it all. People seem to have forgotten that knives cut by being really thin. Despite being really small, the Mora 2/0 seems to always be the one I grab when heading out. It was around my neck for two days on the river fishing this week. It’s a handy little knife.


She’s still razor sharp, but it’s time to repolish the edge and get it cleaned up again. The steel is so easy and fast to sharpen. A 1200 grit Japanese stone will clean it up in no time.
Love Moras. Cheap and get the job done.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Oh yeah. I've a few BK knives that I've stripped that ugly black paint off of and then I've sanded the spines and around the grip area smooth and shiny. On the spines, the corners are quite sharp now, better for using on a ferro rod.
 

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image.jpg


These are knives from culinary school. The top and bottom are an 8 and 10 inch chefs knives. The middle one is a bread knife. The chefs knives had pommels even larger than the bread knife. It was supposed to balance the knife but in rock chopping it made them uncomfortably handle heavy so I ground them off. My instructors loved that I would do that to my knives.
 

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I don't even know....what I'm doing here....
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
View attachment 748520

These are knives from culinary school. The top and bottom are an 8 and 10 inch chefs knives. The middle one is a bread knife. The chefs knives had pommels even larger than the bread knife. It was supposed to balance the knife but in rock chopping it made them uncomfortably handle heavy so I ground them off. My instructors loved that I would do that to my knives.
Beautiful work!
 

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Not sure if this counts but I will post anyway. I tend to get cheap knives due to my habit of losing them after about 6 months or so. As of late I have really loved the Guidesman operative folding knife from Menards. At just about $10 its a great cheap knife. I have had 2 of them now and put them through hell. At one point I even used my currant one to pry up carpet tacks. My only complainant is pocket clip. This is an issue I have with a lot of cheap knives. The screws never seem to stay tight. So I have taken to putting a drop of super glue in and screwing it down as tight as I can to fix that little manufacturing error.
 

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I have a Buck 119 that has mediocre steel (420HC) with top notch heat treat. It’s a good, tough, easy to sharpen knife. But for me, it was almost unusable. Why?

The clip point was begging to be broken off. The guard ran too large, not allowing me to choke up on it. The plastic grip gat way to slippery when wet.

So I reground the tip to a drop point. I ground off the top of the guard, making a more comfy grip. Then I wrapped the grip in sisal, drenched the whole hot mess in epoxy resin, and smoothed it all up.

Since the grip was a little bigger, it wouldn’t fit in the scabbard, so I soaked it down, put the knife in place, and stretched the snap in place to let it dry.

Do you ever make something better for just you?

View attachment 748500 View attachment 748502
The classic 119 is a great knife with a stupid slippery handle. One layer of grip tape solves the problem for me.
 

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I usually break the tip off using the knife as a pry bar or screw driver. Doesn't do much for the knife but great song writing material when you break a Randall.
 
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