Help with a yellow lab.

Discussion in 'Woof Memorial Critter's Corner' started by grecco, Sep 14, 2007.

  1. grecco

    grecco

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    Hello,
    i was hoping some one can help me,
    i picked up a puppy yellow lab for the GF and her family.
    the pup (Missy) is now almost 4 months old.
    around us she is great,affectionate,playful and always happy,
    but when she leaves the house she is very skiddish around other people, she will not let anyone pet her, she backs away.
    she will not enter some one elses house, and backs away from other dogs, with the other dogs she will eventually come around,but then walk away.

    does anyone have any suggestions to help get missy over her shyness?


    thanks.
     
  2. nighteye

    nighteye

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    i have a yellow lab, but never experienced that. I suggest taking her around other people pets constantly. Take her everywhere you can. I would constantly reassure her that all is OK. Theres no telling what she had to deal with as a puppy before you got her. Maybe do a google search on dog shyness.....good luck!

    People in the house: "Socialize, socialize, socialize!" This is something that is said a lot too. The best thing for a puppy is to get them used to dealing with different situations/people. Try to introduce your dog to different situations/people whenever possible. Don't console her if she's nervous; this will give her the idea that she's doing the right thing by being nervous. Instead give a confident "It's okay" in a "everything's under control" kind of tone. "Nothing to worry about here." Give her LOTS of praise if she approaches someone/shows appropriate behaviour.
     

  3. nighteye

    nighteye

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    i have a yellow lab, but never experienced that. I suggest taking her around other people pets constantly. Take her everywhere you can. I would constantly reassure her that all is OK. Theres no telling what she had to deal with as a puppy before you got her. Maybe do a google search on dog shyness.....good luck! I found this in about 2 seconds......

    People in the house: "Socialize, socialize, socialize!" This is something that is said a lot too. The best thing for a puppy is to get them used to dealing with different situations/people. Try to introduce your dog to different situations/people whenever possible. Don't console her if she's nervous; this will give her the idea that she's doing the right thing by being nervous. Instead give a confident "It's okay" in a "everything's under control" kind of tone. "Nothing to worry about here." Give her LOTS of praise if she approaches someone/shows appropriate behaviour.

    Heres a pic of my Bailey.....
     
  4. speck

    speck

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    Now that she's 4 months old -- do you have a fenced dog park near you? They just built one in my town, and it's the best thing for dogs. Get her off the leash before you get into the park and just throw her in. The other dogs will socialize her within a few weeks whether she wants to be or not ...

    My girlfriend's dog is hypothyroid ... which causes anxiety/fear towards *EVERYTHING* in some dogs. Hers is one of them. He spent his first few weeks in the dog park cowering in a corner or wandering around by himself and sniffing him. After a while, a few dogs took a liking to him and decided to 'play' by hunting him. He found out it was more fun if he played back... and now he's as doggy as can be at the park and my house and other places where he's familiar and feels 'safe' ... not so much all the time in weird places like PetCo, but you do what you can.

    I've seen this played out over and over at the park. Dogs are pack creatures, and as much as you and your family make a 'pack' for them that they're a part of, they need to learn how to act like dogs from other dogs and not us big scary two-leggers.