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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Lightning Strike titanium safety plunger, for a Glock 23 Gen 4, and noticed after a low round count, 300 rrds of Speer Lawman 40 S&W 165 GR TMJ, that the wear on the plunger exterior is quite severe. There are repeated gouges that spans the circumference of the exterior diameter of the plunger, as demonstrated with the two pictures below. Given the deepness of the gouging that spans the circumference, I do not believe the titanium nitride coating was applied too lightly, supposedly has a Rockwell hardness number of 70, but rather the material underneath the coating, the titanium stock used was not up to par, heat treated to withstand the fatigue from the repeated action of the striker during the firing sequence. I've emailed Lightning Strike and awaiting a response, but curious to know if any one else using a titanium safety plunger has notice similar wear.


http://shop.lspi.com/Small-Titanium-Safety-Plunger-w-spring-for-GLOCK-Pistols-LS-7924.htm


 

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First question: what exactly was wrong with the OEM part?
 

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Is this only titanium coated, or is the entire plunger titanium?

My bet is that it's titanium coated, and the metal beneath is too soft.

Edit: Just reread the website and saw they say it's all titanium - I don't know about that...

I'd be interested to hear what the company says.
 

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I don't have a definite answer for you but I had the same wear on a plunger.
I purchased a used G23 and when cleaning it I found the same thing.
Apparently the striker is hitting the plunger. I thought maybe the previous owner pulled the striker back and released it with the slide removed from the frame or the trigger bar wasn't pushing the plunger far enough to clear the striker.
I replaced my striker,plunger, spring and trigger bar. After installing the new parts I compared the travel of the plunger with the old and new parts there was no change. My round count is is low and not alot of wear between the slide and frame either. I have run a few hundred rounds thru it and so far so good. Pic of striker wear and my post.
http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1172074
 

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Man, never mess with the safety plunger leave it stock and send that thing back for a refund, the stock one is your safety!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
First question: what exactly was wrong with the OEM part?
Nothing at all, I've heard of the OEM part lasting 10K or more rounds, but threw it in the basket when I was ordering additional spare parts. Ironic, since I thought this part would out last me, being that it is (1) titanium - higher strength, and (2) titanium nitride coating with a Rockwell hardness of 70, but instead takes excess wear with only hundred rounds or so. In hindsight, I feel the money should have been better spent, elsewhere.

stonecutter2 said:
Is this only titanium coated, or is the entire plunger titanium?

My bet is that it's titanium coated, and the metal beneath is too soft.

Edit: Just reread the website and saw they say it's all titanium - I don't know about that...

I'd be interested to hear what the company says.
I too suspect that the titanium is too soft.

paddle007 said:
I don't have a definite answer for you but I had the same wear on a plunger.
I purchased a used G27 and when cleaning it I found the same thing.
Apparently the striker is hitting the plunger. I thought maybe the previous owner pulled the striker back and released it with the slide removed from the frame or the trigger bar wasn't pushing the plunger far enough to clear the striker.
I replaced my plunger, spring and trigger bar. After installing the new parts I compared the travel of the plunger with the old and new parts there was no change. My round count is is low and not alot of wear between the slide and frame either. I have run a few hundred rounds thru it ans so far so good.
Thanks for sharing, I assume you replaced our titanium safety plunger for the Glock OEM or for another titanium one?

tango44 said:
Man, never mess with the safety plunger leave it stock and send that thing back for a refund, the stock one is your safety!
Still waiting on Lightning Strikes response, but until then I've swapped it out for the Glock OEM. What do they say? "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."
 

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Send it back, get your money back, and stick with the original part.
 

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Nothing at all, I've heard of the OEM part lasting 10K or more rounds, but threw it in the basket when I was ordering additional spare parts. Ironic, since I thought this part would out last me, being that it is (1) titanium - higher strength, and (2) titanium nitride coating with a Rockwell hardness of 70, but instead takes excess wear with only hundred rounds or so.
Actually, from Answers.com:

Titanium is listed as 4.0 on the Mohs mineral hardness scale. Iron is 4.0-5.0, therefore steel would be even harder.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_Steel_harder_then_titanium#ixzz1CumEpjcn

The steel striker rubbing against the titanium chewed it up.

Titanium is very strong for it's weight (it's very light) but it's not harder than steel. It might actually be a problem with their titanium nitride coating, maybe not thick enough?

I learned something today!
 

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Another case of trying to fix what ain't broke. Get a glock factory plunger back in there and see what you can do about getting your money back or in store credit. That kind of wear is unacceptable and is just asking for a lawsuit, since it is a safety part.
 

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I recently purchased a Lightning Strike titanium safety plunger, for a Glock 23 Gen 4, and noticed after a low round count, 300 rrds of Speer Lawman 40 S&W 165 GR TMJ, that the wear on the plunger exterior is quite severe. There are repeated gouges that spans the circumference of the exterior diameter of the plunger, as demonstrated with the two pictures below. Given the deepness of the gouging that spans the circumference, I do not believe the titanium nitride coating was applied too lightly, supposedly has a Rockwell hardness number of 70, but rather the material underneath the coating, the titanium stock used was not up to par, heat treated to withstand the fatigue from the repeated action of the striker during the firing sequence. I've emailed Lightning Strike and awaiting a response, but curious to know if any one else using a titanium safety plunger has notice similar wear.


http://shop.lspi.com/Small-Titanium-Safety-Plunger-w-spring-for-GLOCK-Pistols-LS-7924.htm


Did you loose a horse or just find a rope? :rofl:
 

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Looking at the new part, there may actually be some utility to this part. The rounded edges will give a smoother trigger break.

I would get a stock plunger (go ahead and buy 2 in case you mess this part up) and polish the edges to a round smoothness.

Be very very very very careful with this part, since it is one of the things standing between you and a negligent discharge. And believe me, if you have a ND with a modified part, the plaintiff's lawyer will be exceptionally giddy to find out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Actually, from Answers.com:

Titanium is listed as 4.0 on the Mohs mineral hardness scale. Iron is 4.0-5.0, therefore steel would be even harder.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is_Steel_harder_then_titanium#ixzz1CumEpjcn

The steel striker rubbing against the titanium chewed it up.

Titanium is very strong for it's weight (it's very light) but it's not harder than steel. It might actually be a problem with their titanium nitride coating, maybe not thick enough?

I learned something today!
Interesting, I'm not familiar with Mohs, but I am familiar with Brinell and Rockwell hardness numbers, which can get somewhat confusing especially when numbers are thrown around without greater qualification on what scale was used.When I saw a Rockwell hardness of 70, I assumed this was on the C-Scale, for instance one of my 1/2" steel targets which has a Brinell harness number of 500, corresponds to a Rockwell Hardness C50, has taken a severe beating and held up very well, so I thought that a Rockwell Harness of C70 would be absolutely ridiculous. In retrospect, the Rockwell hardness of 70, must have been on an A or B-scale, which corresponds to a Brinell hardness of 363 for A, and 121 on B. Also, there are varying grades and alloys of titanium as there is with steel and the strength varies with how the material was heat treated. Though the manufacturer doesn't specify the grade used, I believe in my case, the lack of quality control from a metals vendor, improperly heat treated titanium or wrong grade shipped, leading to some of these safety plungers that have a soft titanium. Unfortunately, there isn't a lot number assigned anywhere on the packaging or plunger, so be advised, those using titanium safety plungers might want to keep an eye on this part.
 

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I think the Mohs numbers on that answer could be a bit off (as you said, it all depends on the grade of the metal). But it does hold true from everywhere I've read so far that stainless steel is harder than titanium.

It's always beneficial to see a product and a realistic review of it's usefulness or lack thereof.

Thanks for sharing your experiences!
 

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A lot of haters for any non OEM part. I wasn't sure of this part myself till some very knowledgable people (I believe bentbiker was one of them) praised this part.

Bentbiker, I apologize if it wasn't you.
 

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XDMerciless,
Have you cleaned the plunger in the picture? I just removed my LS titanium plunger after 3000 rds and it looked almost exactly like yours until I took some solvent to it. After cleaning, it looked like the stock photo of the new part. The scratches were only in the soot. I believe those marks are made by the extractor rather than the FP. Let's see what LS has to say.

The part is extremely well made, improves the trigger pull (as suggested by FillYourHands, and something is certainly strange here. Lots of people here, with no experience with the product, are awfully quick to judgment.
 

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XDMerciless,
Have you cleaned the plunger in the picture? I just removed my LS titanium plunger after 3000 rds and it looked almost exactly like yours until I took some solvent to it. After cleaning, it looked like the stock photo of the new part. The scratches were only in the soot. I believe those marks are made by the extractor rather than the FP. Let's see what LS has to say.

The part is extremely well made, improves the trigger pull (as suggested by FillYourHands, and something is certainly strange here. Lots of people here, with no experience with the product, are awfully quick to judgment.
 

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I ordered one and should have it in the next day or so. I plan on installing it on my range toy (19c) so I hope to make a thread after I go to the range and throw a few hundred down the pipe.
 

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My experience:

I have this installed in my range only G17. Here is the product after exactly 250 rnds of UMC garbage. When I installed it, the slide was very well cleaned.

Before cleaning...


After cleaning...


As you can see there is a small amount of wear on the corner edge. Am I surprised? No not really. You may want to check with a flashlight and see if there is any major fowling in the plunger hole in the slide.

I do like the feel that the plunger gives, but if I were to see that much wear I would probably get them to send you a new one, or switch back to the original plunger. This is for a range/plinking only gun for me and would not recommend it for anything but that. I would also use some snap caps and routinely check the safe action.
 
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