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Help selecting camera

Discussion in 'Through-the-Lens Club' started by amd4me, Oct 10, 2006.

  1. amd4me

    amd4me Coffee Snob

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    I need a new camera and I was wondering what I should get?
    I was told that the D80 was quite something, is that a good camera?
     
  2. Hokie

    Hokie NRA Member

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    When you buy a SLR you are not buying a camera, you are buying a system. Look at the whole system (lens, flash) and make your choice of which system Canon or Nikon or other you like.
     

  3. nipperwolf

    nipperwolf

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    congrats on one of the vaugest post ever here. ;)

    what's your background?

    what do you want to shoot?

    do you have a lot of experience with 35m SLRs?

    if not, then the D80 is not for you. :supergrin:
     
  4. MrsKitty

    MrsKitty

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    Do you NEED a CAMERA or a dSLR? There is a huge difference between the two.

    How much patience and time do you have? To use a D80 to the fullest potential, it will be quite an investment personally.

    If your heart is set on a dSLR, you can't go wrong with the Nikon or a Canon. Look at the lenses and see which ones you need and who suits your needs better. Go from there. If you already have glass, you might want to stick with your mount.
     
  5. amd4me

    amd4me Coffee Snob

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    Hey be nice.
    I dont have a background in photography.
    I would really like to learn and so I will be getting a new camera in to learn on(D80).
     
  6. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    I think nipperwolf was referring to the fact that you didn't say what it is you wanted to do with that camera - what kind of things you would like to shoot, when, in what environments, etc. You don't need a photography background to say what you are interested in.

    If you want good, solid information about the camera, you cannot go wrong with the reviews on www.dpreview.com. In fact, here is a review of the Nikon D80. It is 30 (yes, thirty) pages long, but it is well worth reading.
     
  7. nipperwolf

    nipperwolf

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    exactly. I was being nice. otherwise, I would have used :upeyes: instead of ;) .

    :supergrin:
     
  8. amd4me

    amd4me Coffee Snob

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    Sorry, I would like to shoot mostly outdoor stuff, mostly land scape.
     
  9. General Sherman

    General Sherman

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    I would get a good camera to start and learn on, that is NOT a SLR.
    Most take very very good photos. Especially with image stabilization built in. Look for a 3 or 4 times optical zoom as a minimum. If you want to do studio work with strobes, you will need a hot shoe.
    If you travel it would help if it used AA batteries which you can pick up around the world. I travel but take a charger and back up batteries which are expensive.

    The SLRs are very complicated and hard to learn if you are not experienced in film photography. They are also big and bulky and expensive.

    A lot of automatic point and shoot cameras also have manual overides for the experienced photographer.

    If you have specific questions, post them and I will try to help.
     
  10. nipperwolf

    nipperwolf

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  11. Fred

    Fred Lifetime Member Millennium Member

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    Agreed. :thumbsup:
     
  12. MtBaldy

    MtBaldy Obie Wan, RIP

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    I was in the same position and bought a Canon S3 IS a few weeks ago. So far I am liking it a lot. It's 6MP with a 12x zoom and many of the exposure controls of an entry DSLR. I had been leaning towards a Konica/Minolta D5 so I could use lenses from my Maxxum 600si but scrapped that when I learned Minolta is out of the camera business. The S3 really is a "bridge" camera for me until I decide if I really need a digital SLR or not.
     
  13. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    I am not a great fan of Sony, but I would be remiss in not mentioning that since Sony bought some of the Minolta camera business, the Sony Alpha A-100 DSLR is compatible with the Minolta A-type bayonet mount lenses. Therefore, your lenses are still quite usable.
     
  14. bwphoto

    bwphoto Lifetime Member

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    To the OP.

    Make sure that if you DO get one of the more advanced point and shoots that it goes WIDE. Most don't go wide enough for landscape work. Nothing like wishing you could just get that one last mountain peak in the side of your frame but taking the extra step backwards puts you over a cliff edge...

    Also, if you want to learn photography, letting the camera do your thinking will not help. It isn't easy at first, it is immensely confusing and one of the most frustrating things to figure out. But when the lightbulb goes off in your head and it all starts to make sense you'll wonder why it took so long to learn. And then you'll wish you had the SLR. The amount of control from most point/shoots to a good SLR is incredible and necessary to obtain the results you're probably after.

    The N80 would be a good choice. You might also consider the Canon 30D. Nikon hasn't really been playing the DSLR game too well and if you're going to be investing in lenses, you'll want them to last you through your camera bodies. Canon seems to be putting more into their bodies than Nikon. I am a Nikon guy looking into Canon/waiting for the MkIII...