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Help me out with my new camera. . .

Discussion in 'Through-the-Lens Club' started by Hantra, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. Hantra

    Hantra Keeps It Real

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    All:

    I got a new camera to replace the Olympus I left in a Taxi in Europe. I bought the Olympus E-300 DSLR.

    I really like the E-300, but it doesn't take as good a photo in low light as the old cheap Olympus C-4000 I had. Why?

    Below are a couple samples. As you can see in the first one, this is what my camera took unaltered. It is not what I saw though. I did not see that red tint, and that warm tone to everything. With the flash it's perfect, but it drowns things out.

    So how do I get rid of this? Is there a setting?

    Below is the data for the pic:

    Flash: Off
    Focal Length: 25 mm
    F-Number: F/4.2
    Exposure Time: 1/2 sec.
    ISO: 100
    Metering Mode: Pattern
    Exposure Cpmpensation: -0.3 step

    When I back off saturation to -15 and go +5 on hue in PShop, it looks a lot more like what I see in the room.

    So the photo is definitely saturated and tilted a bit to red. I took the photo on the "Auto" photo setting, so it picked all the variables.

    Thanks!!!!!
     
  2. Hantra

    Hantra Keeps It Real

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    Here is the Photoshopped one which looks more like what my eyes see in the room.

    BTW, I'm lighting with just a table lamp a few feet away, off to the side, without a shade.
     

  3. Aaron S

    Aaron S

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    It looks like a White Balance thing. I would say more, but I don't know how it all works really. Your camera probably has an Auto setting plus a bunch of presets like sunlight, cloudy, incandescent, etc.

    Aaron
     
  4. spin180

    spin180

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    I say it's the white balance, also.

    That particular camera has several settings for adjusting the white balance. According to www.dpreview.com it's got two settings for incandescent, three for flourescent, three for outdoor situations, four custom settings, a manual preset and auto.

    Try using one of the incandescent settings, or better yet set the white balance yourself. Check your manual for specific steps, but it should just consist of taking a shot of a gray card (or certain other objects will work) while in the light you'll be shooting in, and then using the menu to set that image as the white source. You can also use a white wall or white sheet of paper as long as they're a relatively pure white.

    One other method for setting white balance, and one I particularly like using, is placing a plain coffee filter over the lens and taking a shot of my light source. This usually works very well, and it's easy to keep some filters in my camera bag, or find one if by chance I don't have one.

    ;)
     
  5. jm_usmc

    jm_usmc Two eagles

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    My $.02

    That looks very similar to a problem I was having at my house. Some of my pictures came out having a definite color tint to them if I didn't use the flash. I found that the light in the room was being reflected off of something with that color. I couldn't see it with my eyes but it was very visible in the pics. Try the pics in a different room or look around the room for something of that same color that the lamp lighting is reflecting off of.
     
  6. DTQ

    DTQ c8h10n4o2 me

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    Try setting "White Balance" to "Auto".
     
  7. Hantra

    Hantra Keeps It Real

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    You guys are great!!!! Thanks!!!

    I ASSUMED since I had it on "Auto" the WB was on auto as well. That was not the case. Now it's on auto!!! Thanks a lot!!!!
     
  8. Hantra

    Hantra Keeps It Real

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    OK, so with this method, I just take the shot with each WB setting and then review it?

    Thanks!

    B
     
  9. DTQ

    DTQ c8h10n4o2 me

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    Unless you really want to get into it and risk loosing some photos in the learning process Just leave it on auto.
     
  10. spin180

    spin180

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    Well, no...

    You take the photo that you will use to set the white balance first, set the white balance using that photo via the camera's menu, change the white balance setting itself to custom and then shoot as you would normally. Mind you that's just a general description based on the operation of my camera. You really should consult your camera's manual for the specific steps for that model.

    But DTQ is right. Stick to auto for now, until you can take some time to practice and learn how to use that function properly.

    Good luck!