help first bike!!!!

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by BP44, Apr 11, 2005.

  1. BP44

    BP44

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    Hi I'm new here and i was kinda wondering if i could get some info about a first moto, It has to be suzuki just because of the financing. being young and cool (AKA impressionable) i was leaning towards the SV650 or a katana 600 but the s50 cruiser looks nice and feel a little more comfy. keep in mind this is my FIRST bike and i have a 80 mile a day commute
     
  2. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    The cruiser will be cheaper with the insurance, but the SV650 is probably more comfortable. It is also easier to maneuver than a cruiser as well. I don't know how much riding you're doing will be on the streets or on the highways and such but cruisers without wind shields aren't very comfortable for long distances.

    You sit with your legs forward instead of underneath you in order to help support your weight. Without a wind shield, your arm and your butt/back will be bearing the full brunt of the wind blast. But frankly, 80-miles commute (total or each way?) isn't that bad unless you're on one of those torture devices called sports bike (aka crotch rocket).

    I'm not the cruiser type so I am biased and suggest that the SV650 would be the better choice. It's a popular bike with gazillions of accessories for modification. It's also very sporty as well, especially if you go with the -S model.

    As far as the Katana goes, it's also a good bike but your insurance rate may take a jump even though it's not a crotch rocket. Companies may categorize them as sports bikes because of all of the fairings and such.
     

  3. BP44

    BP44

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    Thanks for the advice FNFAL sorry i wasnt as clear as i should have been, my drive is 80 miles total and almost all highway driving and as straight as a highway can be(very boring) do you yhink it is wise for me to go with a 650 for a first bike or look for a smaller machine? Im a middle of the road guy About 6' 180lbs would this affect anything? I really appriciate(how do you spell) the help
     
  4. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    You're plenty tall for any bike available. You didn't say whether or not you have any riding experience. If not, then you might want something a hair smaller but not too small. None below a 500-cc, or otherwise, you'll find out real fast that you don't have enough power to pass and get out of people's ways at highway speeds.

    The SV is a fairly powerful bike (I think it has 70-hp) but it's not so powerful that you can't master it easily.

    People love the SV and for a damn good reason.
     
  5. BP44

    BP44

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    I Have very limited skills doing anything especially riding motos.I have approx 5 days on back roads with a ninja 250 and feel that i picked up the skills pretty good .As with any new endever the little miss's put me on a budget and the sv650's insurance is really expensive but the Katana and the S50's insurance is Suprisingly low so i guess it's between those two? unless you have a better idea? I realy Like the NINJAs but they dont have the financing deal that fits me. Thanks for all the help:)
     
  6. Laramie In MT

    Laramie In MT

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    I'm actually in the same boat you are. I'm getting ready to take a beginner rider course. I've been torn between a cruiser type and a naked street bike. For performance on your
    80 mile drive, the SV would be better. However, I think the S50 would be nice and comfy. If I were you, I'd try to find a
    buddy who has a cruiser and street bike and ride both long distance and see how each feels.
     
  7. BP44

    BP44

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    yup same boat, but it sure is fun trying to find out what toy to get next;) As a middle of the road choice i will test out a Katana600 tomorrow,it seem to look comfy enough? But i need to be carefull, of my friends that do ride they tell me not to get too much bike to start with:( I just dont know how much is to much yet
     
  8. Laramie In MT

    Laramie In MT

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    Well i'm 6'2" 240. Everyone's told me 250 is too small. I'm strickly looking at cruisers. So i'm not going to go below 500. However, the torque and powerband on a 600 cruiser is much different then that of a 600 sport bike. Just my 2 cents.
     
  9. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    BP,

    Have you taken any motorcycle training course at all like the Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Ridercourse or some sort of equivalence? Just hopping on and ride for five days....I shudder to think what might happens when you hit the road with limited riding experience.

    I'm surprised that the Katana 600 has lower insurance than the SV650. The Katana was and is a good sporty bike that looks fast but not too fast. It should be a good bike. The Ninja 250 may be a good starter bike and would have excellent gas mileage but it's really is too small for highway riding. You don't really have any acceleration to get out of cars' and trucks' paths. If you hit high wind, it'll be all over the place.

    How much is too much? Anything above a 600 would be too much, especially the 600 sports bikes like the Suzuki GSXR or Honda CBR, Yamaha R6, Kawasaki Ninja.

    Same thing with the cruisers. In the cruisers' cases, it's not the horsepower and twitchiness of the throttle response but the weight and the low maneuverability at slow speed.

    The standards (aka naked bikes) are so good for most application because they have comfortable seating position with handlebars that are designed for street maneuverings, good power, good handling, just a good jack of all trades. Not to mention that naked is "in" right now.:cool:
     
  10. BP44

    BP44

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    FNFAL Im singed up for the next msf class and wouldnt even think about taking it to the streets without the knowledge and skills that i really dont have.as for the ninja 250 i rode,it was on a road way, way,waaaaay out of town and was closed off to vehicles;) my main problem is i have no one to ride with to get my practice(Learners permit) and i dont really feel confident enough to venture out on my own when i get my bike and it doesnt help that i live in the middle of town on a very busy road. so im kinda in a pickle
     
  11. quinch

    quinch Turgid Member Millennium Member

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    I'm thinking you need to work on building credit instead of buying a bike, to be brutally honest. Not a slam, I was there not that many years ago. Time flies.

    Aside from that, SV650 and a 3 day MSF course. No SV without the course.

    Needed to add-
    Plan on $1000 for safety gear.
     
  12. glock_19guy1983

    glock_19guy1983

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    A buddy of mine is thinking about buying a Honda Rebel 250. He has only ridden my dirtbike. He wants to stick with a cruiser and I have been trying to talk him into getting at least a 600. I think he is expecting that rebel to have the torque and speed of my dirt bike but I hate to tell him it aint gonna happen.
     
  13. DaisyCutter

    DaisyCutter

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    IMO the SV650 outclasses the Katana 600.

    The Katana was was designed to fool the untrained eye into thinking it's a sportbike. Granted it should be a low maintenance machine.

    I think the liquid cooled SV650 is a more modern, ergonomically comfortable design.
     
  14. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    BP said that the Katana 600's insurance is much lower than the SV650, so I would presume that money is an issue with him and while the SV is a better vehicle, the Katana isn't all that bad either.

    BP, I usually don't recommend people to try to learn on their own before taking an MSF or equivalence riding course. Why not? Because people tend to develop bad habits and techniques. Believe you me, I've been there and done it myself when I was much younger and dumber.

    Fast forward 13 years later (late last year), I took the MSF course when I decided to get back into two-wheeling. The basic techniques are so simple yet if nobody teaches you, you wouldn't know. Thanks to MSF training, I've done two panick stops without any mishaps. Well, thanks to BMW's ABS system too, but the technique and the mindset were there to keep me from freezing up or do something stupid.

    The 250-cc cruisers and standards are great for learners and for people who are slight in statures. But if a person can physically manage a bigger bike AND not prone to acting like a fool, he or she is better served with a mid-sized bike. After a year of riding or so, he or she can upgrade to a bigger bike if that's what the person want.

    PS Don't buy the bike until you pass MSF course and get your license. The course may change your mind on what you may want to buy and ride. Not to mention it'd help with your driver's license such as the Motor Vehicle Department may waive your riding skills test AND you may get a big discount with the insurance company though not all insurance companies give discounts for MSF training.

    I am going to take the MSF Intermediate (sometimes called Advanced) Ridercourse in a few more months.
     
  15. BP44

    BP44

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    Thank you guys for all the info it's been vert helpfull FNFAL your right i am on a limited budget and as far as insurance goes its kinda like this:SAFECO

    SV650s=1800/year
    KATANA600=750/year
    S50=680/year

    I've always been told to practice up before a test, but it really makey more sense to take the MSF course and start off with a solid game and good habits.thanks for the advice..:)

    QUIENCH thanks for the advice, I could'nt agree with you more:).
    but a moto has been a dream in the making for me for a very long time(since about 5),And i feel that im finally at that point where financially i can afford such a thing(as long as it financed through suzuki at 6%for 3 years then it goes to 9%:cool: )

    DAISY CUTTER I have no doubts that the sv650 could run circles around the katana Im really looking for a mild mannord bike thats not going to kick my but when i start, but not going to leave me wanting more down the road a year or two
     
  16. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    BP,

    It looks like you've got a good plan ahead of you. I still say wait until after MSF training before you make the decision to buy the bike. That way you can get your license and go do some test riding. You may very well like the cruiser riding style. Also with Suzuki, they'd finance accessories and gear as well. So, buy some saddlebags or some sort of cargo carrier for the bike; whichever it is, and get riding gears. You would need at least two sets of riding gear but I don't think that Suzuki would finance that much but you never know.

    One helmet should do and one set of boots & a pair of gloves would do, but preferrably two sets of clothings. One set for cooler weather and one set for warmer weather plus rain gear which could be cheap or expensive depending on what you want.

    Since that summer is coming up you'd need a set for warm weather riding and save up for cool weather riding later.

    There is no replacement for leathers as far as protection capability goes. BUT, leathers are expensive and uncomfortable, especially in the heat. However, since that most of your ridings are going to work on the highway, you'd probably need leathers for high speed crashing. You don't dress for the ride. You dress for the crash and since that you can't plan for when it's convenient for you to crash...

    Since that you're also on limited budget and may not want to have to owe Suzuki too much, you may have to settle for textile riding gears. It's better than jeans and denims but nowhere as good as leathers when it comes to tear resistance. Better than nothing though.

    Don't scrimp on helmets. Most decent helmets are both DOT and Snell certified which means that a $200 helmet is supposedly capable of protecting your noggin the same way that a $500 helmet. But that $500 helmet is much more comfortable to wear and you'd be inclined to wear it more. Better cushions used, better venting, less fogging up, et al. Comfortable headgear is mucho important because it doesn't distract you from important things like paying attention to traffic. Not to mention that the more expensive helmets have removable liners in which you can throw in the washing machine or wash by hand. Believe you me, your helmet stinks up real fast.

    Hopefully you have found a good Suzuki dealership with good gears sales rep. They can help you properly fit your helmet and your gears. And they are usually giving out good discounts on gears when you buy a bike from them. The MSF certificate may even get you more discount either from your own dealership's parts store or from your local gears store.
     
  17. BP44

    BP44

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    FNFAL the one stipulation to me getting my bike is that i also get ALL the safety gear i need or want. I have $1500 for the safety gear added to the cost of what ever bike i end up with, I really hav'nt priced the gear,Is that enough? my other question is the dealer really wants to sell me on the S50 AKA INTRUDER800 being a 800cc cruiser is that to big? Just want to narrow down the field so when i do take the MSF class i can have an idea of what to test drive first. Now when you talk about riding gear do you mean from head to toe? I have boots, WILDLAND firefighter to me they seem more than sturdy enough beside they cost $400 and i really hate to buy another pair:( What about pants? Leather or synthetic? I swear i havnt been down the road of leather pants;) but the synthetic just sounds more comfy
    THANKS for the help it's much appreciated ;c
     
  18. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    An 800-cc cruiser should be fine. They aren't like the Yamaha V-Max hot rod so the power delivery should be slow, deliberate and smooth.

    Your described boots "should" be just fine also. Here's the catch about non-riding boots: the toe may not fit under the gear lever for upshift, or squeeze in between the engine and the rear brake lever. Or ankle support too thick that you can raise your foot high enough for the rest of the gear shifts. That's something that you'd have to try out on the bike. My Red Wing work boots were unworkable with the Honda Nighthawk at MSF training.

    There are also people who wear oversuits from Aerostitch (an excellent company with excellent gears albeit not cheap) and when they get to work, they'd simply take off the oversuit and be ready. I ride for fun and not for work, but I've already gone to one business meeting that was informal enough to require polo shirt and pants. I wore my leathers and then changed in the restroom when I got to my destination.

    Oversuits are convenient except that if it's too hot, you'll sweat through your clothings AND it's a compromise for protection because the protective clothing aren't fitted closer to your skin. In a crash, if you wear too loose of clothings then these things will roll and either rotate the cushions away from where you need, or chafe your skin badly. But mind you, it's better than T-shirt and short.

    So, you'll have to decide how to compromise between costs, convenience, and comfort. There's no free lunch, I'm afraid.

    So, you figure $500 for a good helmet (close to top tier Shoei or Arai or AGV) and possibly $200 for a pair of boots if yours don't work out. That'll leave you $800 for jacket and pants. For around $300 you can get a mesh top and bottom for summer riding. That leaves $500 for a leather top & bottom combo. Don't forget gloves. A good pair of gloves is essential in riding comfort. Your hand will get numbed anyway, but a good glove would mitigate this numbness. Figure around $100 for a really good pair of gloves.

    It's possible to get very well equipped for $1500.

    You can shop for cheap on the internet and save more. The only problem is the fitting. There lies the catch about internet orders.

    And leather is good for many a things, comfort ain't it. You'd need underwears from Under Armour. That's another couple hundred of bucks for long sleeve t-shirts and compression shorts. Not essential but highly suggested, especially in the summer.
     
  19. BP44

    BP44

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    Thanks agian for the great advice FNFAL i cant wait to get through my msf class and get rolling:cool: ;c
     
  20. Cirric

    Cirric technogoob

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    Just another $0.02:

    The MSF class is (IMHO) the best thing you can due to protect yourself. (I am also a self-taught rider. The class is great.)

    Remember to go SIT on whatever you are looking at, like you are riding it (and ride it if you can.) I know it's common sense - but when I sat on what I thought was the 'right' bike, it felt cramped, and uncomfortable... Just the wrong riding postion for me.

    If you aren't comfortable, riding won't be as fun...