Hell Day

Discussion in 'Cop Talk' started by i8547, Feb 13, 2010.

  1. i8547

    i8547 Without Equal

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    Bright and early tomorrow at 0700 marks the beginning of "Hell Day!" Finally I get to be the one beneath the smokey cover, yelling at the top of my lungs, spitting, and pulsating at the neck while barking at the young helpless misguided wayward souls looking to fulfill their dreams of becoming Johnny Law.

    Ears... OPEN. Eyeballs... CLICK.

    Who here remembers their "Hell Day," "Day Zero," "Black Monday" ... or whatever it may have been called?
     
  2. Gangrel

    Gangrel

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    Man, I would love to work at a real academy
     

  3. CanIhaveGasCash

    CanIhaveGasCash

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    I remember it at my first academy. The first half was kind of an orientation, get to know the staff, what to expect, then when the speeches were finished the tac officer came in and the yelling began.

    We were all running towards the pad, but nobody had any idea what or where the pad was. We eventually figured it out.

    I knew what i was in for coming in, so I made sure that I was clean shaven and well dressed. Well my idea of clean shaven and the tac officer's differed. I was referred to as Cadet Sideburns for the remainder of the academy.

    Then I went through another academy in a different state, and boy was it lame.
     
  4. Glock-it-to-me

    Glock-it-to-me Catching liars

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    Go ask Alice, I think she'll know
    The mind is your most powerful asset.
     
  5. msu_grad_121

    msu_grad_121 BOOSH

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    I was sorta lucky, no real yelling, just pushups and gigs when you screwed the pooch. I had SEVERAL...

    I did earn a nickname which stuck with me thru the academy during DT tho. For some reason having to do with the academy changing locations, they didn't have any PT gear to sell us, so they just said wind pants or shorts and a t shirt. Well, my dumb *** wears my favorite/most comfortable t shirt at the time...wait for it... NYPD ESU shirt. :whistling:

    OHHHHH MAN did I get it from the instructors. I got to be the crash test dummy for EVERYTHING. "Hey SWAT-Boy, get over here so I can punch and kick you." Ugh. :upeyes:

    Learned my lesson, tho. Keep your mouth shut, your head down and do what you're told. No more, no less.
     
  6. k9medic

    k9medic

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    Just about everyday was a "hell day" for us. Don't know where you sissy guys are going... :)
     
  7. David Armstrong

    David Armstrong

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    Agreed. Never really understood the reasoning behind the hell-day philosophy and such. Doesn't seem to do much to make better officers. Sort of telling when the available research indicates the officers who graduate from "academic" academies do better than officers that go through "military" academies pretty much across the board.
     
  8. CanIhaveGasCash

    CanIhaveGasCash

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    Having gone through both a military academy and an academic academy, IMO the military academy definitely has its place. My military academy had a 50% drop rate, the academic academy only had 1 person that couldn't make it.

    The academic academy was putting people out on the street that had no business being there. Maybe its just where I am, but in the 2 years that I have been here about 50% of people who graduated from the academic academy didn't make it on the street. This isn't a tough area in the least.

    The success rate on the street in my military academy was much higher.
     
  9. wprebeck

    wprebeck Have you seen me?

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    Because if you can't handle someone yelling at you while under pressure to perform, then you sure as hell don't need to be in this line of work. I don't care if you're a street officer, as most of you are, or if you work inside, like a few of us. If you can't handle running until you can't run anymore, and then being yelled at for various and sundry reasons, you sure as hell won't be able to make good decisions in a life or death situation.

    We're not the military, but we DO face situations that require instant decisions that could possibly end someone's life, or save it. In my opinion, that's why we do all the yelling and screaming in the academy. So that, when the bad day comes, we'll be better prepared for it.

    Reading a book is crap. I read 2-3 novels a week, plus surf multiple forums, read the newspaper, magazines, etc. Means I'm well-read. Doesn't mean I was trained to handle a stressful situation without breaking.
     
  10. LilCop2002

    LilCop2002

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    As a Campaign Hat Hell Raiser, please be sure that you know to stay hydrated and to use your diaphragm in order to get your point across. I've seen many of my coworkers that can't speak for weeks at a time and one in particular that is on his way out of the military for damage to vocal cords.

    We yell at people in order to rattle their cages to weed out the ones who will cave under pressure.

    We also yell so that people all over can hear, understand, fix, and not make the same mistake that the poor soul we are correcting is making.

    We also ensure that people are able to follow the chain of command and do what is expected of them immediately without hesitation. As we all know, if your cave under pressure, a simple command could end someone's life.

    Keep it in mind but also remember to have fun! Do your job without changing who you are and ensure that you can SWITCH IT OFF! Once the hat comes off, so does the mask. Also know that there are times where you will need to take that hat off before it's time and step into a different pair of boots.

    Hell, I took a pic that you'll enjoy and I'll post it soon...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2010
  11. silverado_mick

    silverado_mick

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    I don't want anyone backing me up that can't at the very least handle the pressure of being screamed at for no reason. Some things you can't learn in a book, and there's a lot of things you can't learn about a person until you induce some extraordinary stress into their life.

    To the OP congrats on the position. Good luck and remember to yell from your gut not your throat.
     
  12. msu_grad_121

    msu_grad_121 BOOSH

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    Don't get me wrong, we got some hollering during PT and DT, but that screaming in my ear garbage just won't fly with me. Not because I can't handle it, but because I'm not willing to do so. As for people not being able to cut it because they went to this type of academy or that, its my opinion that a person that fails does so because of them, not because their feelings were hurt because an instructor was hollering at them. If you can't cut it, you can't cut it. And even tho I went to a more "academic" academy vs. a "militaristic" academy, I've been told by most of the officers I've worked with that they'd rather have me at their back than most of the other officers within each unit or shift I've worked. I know that sounds egotistical as hell, but it is the truth.

    If you're a hard charger, you're a hard charger. If you're a slug, you're a slug. Plain and simple. Again, these are just my opinions, and the don't necessarily reflect reality.
     
  13. jenrick

    jenrick

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    We were doing cadet roleplay traffic practicals about a month ago. I was the passenger in the vehicle, where the driver gets hooked up for a warrant. Once they pull the driver out I began to get verbally agressive with the backup officer, and if given the chance the primary as well. I never did anything but yell at them, call them names, threaten to go to IA, etc. No physical aggression, nothing but yelling and pointing. I requested (well demanded) their names and badge numbers. I had 4 guys shaking so hard they couldn't write their names and badge numbers down. After the practical I asked them if they had ever had anyone get in their face and yell. The answer as unanimously no they hadn't.

    I don't want the city to spend money on a cadet that's halfway through the academy when they realize that getting yelled at is not something they want to deal with. I don't want an officer on their first week of FTO to finally have someone get in their face and break down unable to handle it. I don't want someone in the middle of an active shooter situation to suffer a sensory overload because they've never had to make decisions under stress with penalties for being wrong. I want someone who realize that yelling is just that, yelling, loud noise. That yelling by itself isn't a big deal, that a little physical discomfort like pushup's isn't a big deal. I want officers on the street to be able to think and act when under stress, and severe sensory overload.

    Hell day, stress reaction training, what ever, serves to begin weeding people out who aren't cut out for the extremes of this job. 60%-70% of this job can be done by a person with good communication and sales skills. The rest of it on the other hand requires the ability to act under stress, make life or death decisions with limited information, and get in the fight for your life. We need to weed out the folks who are only capable of being in sales. The fastest, simplest, gut check is someone in your ear/face yelling and capable of causing your pain. I support it 110%.

    Good luck, enjoy, and I second the using your diaphragm.

    -Jenrick
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2010
  14. Chico Bill

    Chico Bill Millennium Member

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    RECRUIT ******* What did you just do!?!

    SIR...I wiped a bird dropping from my head sir!

    WHAT??!?!?

    A Bird dropping sir?

    YOU MEAN TO TELL ME A BIRD USED YOUR HEAD FOR TARGET PRACTICE!!!!!?!??!??!

    (At this point we were all literally shaking trying not to laugh...and the DI couldn't hold it in any longer so he walked away....)


    ....Gotta love the grinder.
     
  15. RetailNinja

    RetailNinja

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    I feel the same way. The ISP academy is often called the Hitler Youth camp by older non-ISP cops who went there.
     
  16. packsaddle

    packsaddle

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    I'm currently enrolled in a "paramilitary" academy and have concluded that the whole yelling thingy is not as an effective training tool as fundamental knowledge of the law and proper tactical skills (i.e. handcuffing).

    If someone is screaming in your face while you are doing your job then that person should be screaming in handcuffs until you are finished doing your job.

    If someone is screaming at you from across the street, so what?

    Like someone said above, screaming is just noise, until it interferes with your duties....which is where the tactics training comes into play.

    I do agree that yelling has its place during role play scenarios, however superfluous yelling is ultimately ineffective and takes away from important training hours that could be otherwise used for more useful purposes (i.e. tactics).

    Just my opinion.
     
  17. LilCop2002

    LilCop2002

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    Part of my program's training is by using phases.

    In phase 1, we are high volume and directive.
    In phase 2, we are normal volume with the ability to go high volume and are coaching.
    In phase 3, we are normal volume and are mentors.

    We push them hard for a week while they are transiting around campus. When it comes time to teach, we take the Campaign Hats "off", teach, and then put the hats back on.

    It's a pain in the butt for the students, but it is not a high intensity program for the full 6 weeks.
     
  18. trifecta

    trifecta

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    My fire academy was the physical, in your face experience. Police school was all academic. I believe the boot camp experience, while not at all enjoyable when you are over 30, is valuable. To make it through without quitting teaches you something about yourself and your ability to finish the job. I think that mental toughness, and ability to perform under pressure will pay off for many people.

    So, the academic stuff is critical. It is what will keep the bad guy in jail and you out. The boot camp experience may be what keeps you alive in the mean time.
     
  19. silverado_mick

    silverado_mick

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    The primary purpose of the yelling is not really to ensure that you can handle being yelled at on a call, although it is a good thing if people wash out because they can't handle it. Of course you are going to take control of the scene if that's happenning on the street. The purpose is to induce a higher level of stress while demanding instant and immediate obediance to orders and critical thinking while under said stress, thereby raising the level of probability that the graduate will have the ability to take control when being yelled at.

    Same reason we impose time limits on qual day at the range. Not because we think you have x amount of time to get your shots off in a gunfight, but in order to add an additional level of stress to the training to simulate in some small way the stress you will feel on the street.
     
  20. msu_grad_121

    msu_grad_121 BOOSH

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    Big +1!

    Maybe its because I've been doin this job for longer than a minute, but this is a perfect example of my thoughts on the subject. On the street if someone is as belligerent as the horror stories from the more paramilitary instructors are, they get a free ride in the back seat of a police cruiser! I'm an active shooter instructor and if I end up playing a role in the training scenario, I might get loud but I don't feel the need to yell at my students. Maybe its because every time I've been yelled at and unable to address the yeller, I glaze over and stop listening, maybe because I'm not working with a bunch of cadets, I don't know.

    Now, as I'm looking into moving in the near future, I'm facing the fact that I'm probably going thru an academy again. If I go thru a paramilitary academy, so be it. I won't see it as ideal, but I'll be fine. Again, its my preference, but how often do preferences work out for any of us?