GlockTalk Forum banner

21 - 40 of 79 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,016 Posts
That seems like only 259-275 rpm. Is that right?
Yeah, that sounds about right. IIRC from reading a book written by a helo pilot who flew Hueys in Vietnam, the main rotor on the Huey was ~50' in diameter, and turned at about 300 rpm. As with regular airplane propellers, you want to keep the tips subsonic, otherwise they start making more noise than thrust. The advancing rotor blade will see an airspeed of its velocity plus whatever airspeed the helo is making, so you want some margin.

-Pat
 

·
1911 lover
Joined
·
10,127 Posts
Nothing like a chip light and horn when your flying over water.. turbines are reliable.. transmissions are usually reliable..

And you dont do a hot start in something i am flying... i will be angry..


EGT. IS IMPORTANT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
I crewed (67N) Huey's for years. The Jesus nut is a slang term for the nut that secures the main rotor hub to the mast. It has nothing to do directly with the rotor blades. It isn't coming off in flight. The Huey is the most reliable aircraft the Army ever had. They don't just fall out of the sky because a nut came lose. The Jesus nut story is just that, a story. Think about it. It was hard as heck to take off, you needed help from Jesus to get it off. Not as exciting as story I know but that's where it came from. We also had a hel* hole. Any comments on where that came from? It's pretty lame too
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,720 Posts
Last time I was spinning like that bad things where happening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,955 Posts
I was watching a documentary yesterday that was dated 2012. They were talking about a “super Huey” used by the Marines that was a gunship with more power and had 4 rotor blades and 4 tail rotor blades. It may not be in the inventory anymore. I’ve seen lots of Blackhawks, but no Hueys in years.
 

·
NRA4EVR
Joined
·
11,456 Posts
I was watching a documentary yesterday that was dated 2012. They were talking about a “super Huey” used by the Marines that was a gunship with more power and had 4 rotor blades and 4 tail rotor blades. It may not be in the inventory anymore. I’ve seen lots of Blackhawks, but no Hueys in years.
UH-1Y, still in service and still being made. The Huey sure has evolved - five tons added, horsepower more than tripled over the years.

There aren’t many machines with that kind of endurance and legacy. The UH-1, C-130, Cessna 172, Jeep.
 

·
NRA Life Member
Joined
·
28,405 Posts
When I was going to school in Chicago, I worked in a gear factory to make $ for school. One of the things I made was a SS ring gear about 6 or 7 inches in diameter that they said went in the transmission of a 70’s model Huey.
 
  • Like
Reactions: flyover and G19Tony

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,995 Posts
During the about 40 years I flew helicopters I tried to not think about what was going on overhead. :)

In order to not kill themselves, the pilot has to have a very good understanding of the helicopter's mechanical and flight operation.
I know of many dozens of dead pilots that didn't.
 

·
NRA Life Member
Joined
·
28,405 Posts
For you helicopter guys, what are those two flappy things. They looked connected. Some sort of counterweight?


IDK, Is that the technical term for them ?
 
  • Like
Reactions: G19Tony and flyover

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Yeah, that sounds about right. IIRC from reading a book written by a helo pilot who flew Hueys in Vietnam, the main rotor on the Huey was ~50' in diameter, and turned at about 300 rpm. As with regular airplane propellers, you want to keep the tips subsonic, otherwise they start making more noise than thrust. The advancing rotor blade will see an airspeed of its velocity plus whatever airspeed the helo is making, so you want some margin.

-Pat
That's right. In r/c model airplanes, we call that "prop rip", when the very loud engine become offensively loud. We generally have noise restrictions where we fly, and a prop ripping solicits unfavorable comments from people. Plus, you lose efficiency (thrust) when that happens. We go to larger diameter propellers to combat that. But at least airplane pilots don't have to worry about retreating blade stall, like helo pilots do (I fly both).

Regarding flying both - an airplane "wants" to fly. A helo does not. You can look away from your airplane for a few seconds, and unless it runs into something, it won't crash. You cannot look away from your helo for even one second. Flying an r/c helo is like trying to keep a marble on a flat glass plate. Or like trying to juggle 3 balls while standing on top of a bowling ball with one foot. After a 9 minute flight with my electric helo, my brain is quite sore. I can fly airplanes all day long.
 
21 - 40 of 79 Posts
Top