close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Heinlein fans, "Variable Star"

Discussion in 'The Book Rack' started by stevetexas, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. stevetexas

    stevetexas

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    Ladies and gentlemen :wavey:

    Despite the fact that Robert Heinlein died in 1988, a new book has been published in his name. It is called "Variable Star".

    Here is a link to the Amazon page, with some reviews. I am the Steve Holden who panned it because of its overt anti USA slant and pacifism. The real life Robert Heinlien was not a pacifier and strongly disapproved those who are. Robert Heinlien was a huge supporter of Veterans of combat. Paul (AKA Spider) Robinson ran to Canada during the Vietnam War and lives there now, he has taken Canadian citizenship. Need I say more?

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/cu...RSSOTOOP9SC5SHelpfulReviews6.v=1&voteError=0&


    There are tons of info on the net, including this review by SciFi author John C. Wright...

    http://johncwright.livejournal.com/45956.html

    I am asking any Heinlein fans to go to Amazon and post comments after you have read the book and the many comments on the net.

    steve
     
  2. rdsharp

    rdsharp

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0
    Despite your position that Heinlein "strongly disaproved" of pacifists, Spider Robinson, and his wife, were personal friends of both Robert and Virginia Heinlein. The novel is based on a 7 page outline prepared by Heinlein in 1955, and given to Robinson to complete (as a Robinson work) by Heinlein's literary executor. Robinson is hardly a hack. He's won 3 Hugos (one less that RAH) and a Nebula (one more than Heinlein).
     

  3. stevetexas

    stevetexas

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    Hi rdsharp :) ,

    You said that this is a Robinson book, not a Heinlein one. As it happens, I agree with you on that, however.....

    Take a look at the top of the front cover of the book, the name that is given Top Billing is Robert A. Heinlein.

    I have read all of Heinlein, including his nonfiction essays. There is no way Heinlein would have allowed his name to be used on this book.

    Anyway, I and lots of others have commented at Amazon...

    http://www.amazon.com/Variable-Star..._bbs_sr_1/104-9786297-3370347?ie=UTF8&s=books

    Steve
     
  4. rdsharp

    rdsharp

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree with you that RAH has top billing. However, the directive given to Robinson was to write it as a Robinson book; not to try to duplicate Heinlein's style. The idea was to publish it as a "collaborative" work with both their names on it. And, as I pointed out, Robinson has nearly as many Hugos as Heinlein. (And no, I don't put him in the same league, at all.)

    I also agree that he wouldn't have wanted his name on the book, and I haven't even read it yet. He had thirty-three years from the time he wrote the outline, until he died, and never wrote the book. Moreover, to the best of my knowledge, he only wrote one collaborative work: Beyond Doubt. It was one of the three "Stinkeroos" which he refused to have republished after their initial appearance in the 1940s. Yet, it, and the other two: Pied Piper, and My Object All Sublime have been republished recently. I read them last month. He tried to destroy all of the draft copies of his first novel, For Us the Living, but it was recently discovered, and published as his last novel.

    In my opinion, Ginny would have published old grocery lists if she had found them lying around. (As proof see Tramp Royale and Grumbles from the Grave. She also was responsible for releasing the truly awful Fear No Evil in 1970 while he was deathly ill.) Since Ginny's death, publication has been largely in the hands of his former agent and the executive board of the Heinlein Society. http://www.heinleinsociety.org/rah/index.htm.

    You and I may disagree with some, or all, of what they do. But with few exceptions, these people were close (often very close) to Robert Heinlein while he was living. Heinlein was a complex man whose political views ranged from far left to Libertarian during the course of his life. He had a tendency to "collect" people of varying view points as friends. That he might not have wanted his name on the book, doesn't mean that he wouldn't have wanted Robinson to write it. It wouldn't have been the first idea he gave away.