HD-DVD vs. Blu-Ray

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Rogueplayer, Jul 6, 2007.

  1. Rogueplayer

    Rogueplayer Guest

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    Same story as Beta v VHS.

    Don't want to wait until the dust settles.

    Have reviewed what studios are behind each format, with that said, any owners out there? Up-converting of your standard, existing DVDs,to 720p or 1080i/p, an improvement over 480p??

    All reviews, thus far, have stated that the HD-DVD transfers are of higher quality; ala Home Theatre Magazine.

    Think I will pick up a HD-DVD this weekend; love my DirecTv HD.
     
  2. JimBianchi

    JimBianchi Da Da CLM

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    In the near term, Blockbuster is still a major player in the movie recording sales and rental business. They have picked Blu Ray for their future.

    In the long term, I believe Blockbuster will go the way of Tower Records because of online sales and downloads.

    5 years, 10 on the outside.

    When the dust settles, all that will be left is Wally World and rental kiosks.


    Jim
     

  3. Mr. PC

    Mr. PC Guest

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    I have a HD Samsung projection TV but I am still using a normal cheapy APEX DVD player via an S-Video cable, I think. Should I at least upgrade to a progressive scanning one with an upconverter? I have no clue what I just said. LMAO.

    :)
     
  4. JimBianchi

    JimBianchi Da Da CLM

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    I am keeping up with my cable provider. I have the basic plan, when they upgrade that with what ever, I follow, maybe.

    And maybe next year at Xmas, I'll take the HDTV plunge. There still not enough programming on that I watch to make the switch yet.

    I’ll match the specs at that time.

    I really don't follow the alphabet soup TV/Stereo/Video game to well. This stuff changes almost as fast as computers and I stopped try to keep up with hardware/software stuf two years ago.

    I pay attention to who ever seems to have the best long term plan and buy my new electronics accordingly.
     
  5. jason10mm

    jason10mm NRA-GOA-TSRA

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    I'm running HD-DVD throgh my xbox360 on a 61" 1080p LED DLP display.

    VERY NICE!

    I can wax poetic about HD-DVD, blu-ray, and HDTVs.

    Bottom line, first make sure your TV is actually a HDTV. Then see what resolution is can display (typically 720p or 1080i/p). For movie watching purposes, there is NO perceivable difference between 1080i and p, we get the same amount of info either way. There is also no perceivable difference between 720p and 1080i/p if you sit far away. There is a nice chart that shows this, but for example you should sit within 11' of a 55" display and 7'of a 42" display to see any benefit to 1080. Most folks don't sit this close.

    If you do have a HDTV, and you sit close enough, then it is worth it to upgrade. The first thing you should do is get HD over cable or satellite. Most major networks and premium channels have a HD channel and the difference is pretty noticable.

    Upscaling DVD players are NOT HD. They take the 480 DVD image (480 horizontal lines of resolution) and double the pixels to make it look better on a HDTV. Note that most HDTVs already do this, it is just that some good upscaler DVD players do it better than the TV.

    Hd-DVD and Blu-ray are the top dogs. They display a full 1080 lines of resolution, while cable is usually 720 and is overcompressed, leading to a bad image during fast motion scenes. The audio is markedly improved, provided you have a receiver that can accept the audio.

    While Hd-DVD and Blu-ray are competing technologies, the data they carry is essentially the same. The movies are coded in similar ways and are often the exact same data file, so theoretically the end result should be identical. It really depends on the player and the display more than the disc. HD-DVD, because it is the "official" product of the DVD forum, can use the DVD logo and add a regular DVD side to the disc. So if you see a HD-DVD/DVD "combo", that is a disc with the HD-DVD on one side, and a regualr DVD on the other (though thre are now discs with both on the same side and cover art on the opposite side). Most HD-DVDs hold 30 gigs of data.

    Blu-ray is not endorsed by the DVD forum so they technically can't use DVD in any marketing. Most hold 50 gigs, though many are single layer discs holding 25 gigs.

    The practical effect of these two formats is that players can only play one or the other (with a few dual players on the market) and some studios support one over the other. Sony, Fox, Lionsgate Films and Disney only support Blu-ray, though there have been very few Fox or Disney blu-ray movies overall. Universal and Weinstein (formerly Dimension Films) support only HD-DVD. Warner and Paramount support both, though Warner has released many films only on HD-DVD, citing blu-rays lack of polished interactive features as the reason. Batman Begins and the Matrix movies are a good example.

    So you must choose a side, unless you want to buy a player for each format. If you really like Sony movies, then go blu. If you really like Universal, go red. HD-DVD players are generally cheaper and all can support interactive features. blu-ray players are more expensive and rumor has it the older players will not support interactive features (but may still play the movie).

    Both formats still have teething issues with incompatible movies and player problems. Blu-ray discs outsell HD-DVD by 2:1, mainly on the large install base of Playstation 3 consoles. Films released in both formats sell around the same or slightly more on the blu-ray side.

    I think eventually one will "win". Or both will fail and we will be stuck with high compression 720p cable and downloads because folks just don't know any better. This happened with music, though music is a more portable experience than movies.

    I love HD. There is a very distinct difference on my set. I think it is worth it for anyone who has already sprung for a HDTV of a decent size.
     
  6. JellyBelly

    JellyBelly Meat Popsicle

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    I bought the HD player that goes with my XBox360 because it was only $200. I'll probably get a Blu-Ray player when the prices come down to around $200 as well.

    I only have about 6 HD movies, but they're visually MUCH better than regular DVDs. When 300 comes out I'll be in line to get mine. I hope that HBO will someday offer a HD release of Band of Brothers.:thumbsup: