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Harvesting timber on your property

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Mr981, Feb 2, 2010.

  1. Mr981

    Mr981

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    We live on a mostly wooded 15 acre lot and have decided it's time to "manage" the woods in a proper fashion.

    I've called a few timber companies for quotes on which trees, how much are they worth and how the process works.

    I'd appreciate suggestions on how this best works from someone familiar with the process; thanks for any help in advance.
     
  2. Steve0853

    Steve0853

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    Go into your woods and look for pines greater than 20 inches in diameter.

    Count them. If you have more than 30 or 40, then you should get a registered forester to give you an estimated value. If there's a lot of good pines, it will be worth it to pay him for his estimate.

    If you have only hardwoods, then let the logging companies give you quotes. There's not gonna be enough value to worry about paying a forester unless you have some unusual case, like an old growth stand of walnut or something.
     

  3. yellolab

    yellolab

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    I just a guy finish my lot. He took softwoods only(per my request) for both pulp and wood, and I got $1500 cash and had him clear/stump/level 5 acres in back of my house, which took him a couple weeks.
    I have 40 acres total.
    I know it does not answer directly, but should give you a idea anyhow.

    Kevin
     
  4. Mr981

    Mr981

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    Steve:

    Do you have a feel for what the hardwoods are worth? We have extensive Maple, Red Oak, Cherry and a few Walnut, all in the 18" and above width.
     
  5. Bruce H

    Bruce H

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    With prices for timber what they are now, might as well let them grow unless disease is a problem. Lot of mills here have shut down because of very cheap prices for wood products.
     
  6. Bilbo Bagins

    Bilbo Bagins Slacked jawed

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    If you have any tree with green racketball sized nuts that look like this.

    [​IMG]
    You have Black Walnut, they are somewhat common in OH and PA and the wood is worth some money. Most HONEST timber guys will pay you at least a grand per tree.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2010
  7. Bilbo Bagins

    Bilbo Bagins Slacked jawed

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  8. failsafe

    failsafe

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    I knew of a guy that paid to harvest walnut tree's, he had quite an operation..This was before all the veneer aplication's..Not all trees are created equal..He would only pay primo for tree's with long trunk's, where the first limb jutted out was his determining the length of the trunk..
    Keep in mind, good wood underground that can contribute to the trunk length..

    There are horror stories in the Ozarks of People being paid to have their trees harvested and the harvester's made such a mess out of their land it was unuseable...
     
  9. Andy123

    Andy123

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    Hardwood prices are in the basement right now, or were a few month ago, anyway. Things may be better if you can wait a year.
     
  10. 2@low8

    2@low8

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    REgardless of the acreage or type of trees do yourself a favor and hire a professional forester. Their job is to look out for you. The timber harvester is looking out for himself. I can guarantee that in the end, after you pay a 7 - 9% commission to a forester you will end up with more money in your pocket. In addition, you will have someone look over the timber sale contract and will enforce the provisions of the contract.

    The contract will specify when and where the loggers may work, what trees they may and may not take, will require that they use BMP's (Best Management Practices), that they will not work in wetlands or stream setbacks, etc. If you just sell to a "logger" and he gives you 10 grand he'll just cut and run. You may be left with a mudhole filled with slash, hydraulic fluid and skidder tires.

    Trust me on this one, this is not where you want to "cheap-out." You will kill the residual value of your land if you do not do this right. And remember, it will take about 20 years to get it back into shape if it is screwed up.
     
  11. Toml

    Toml

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    Good advice. Save enough from the sales proceeds to replant, too.
     
  12. CodyBoy

    CodyBoy

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    make sure they clean up their mess.

    Most would just as soon leave the tops laying , scattered about and leave you with 100's of stumps and ruts everywhere.

    Call around get references, make sure they are reputable company.



    Haven't checked on lumber prices lately but is this really a good time to do this since the building industry is not doing so great right now?
     
  13. mpatch

    mpatch

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    with timber prices what they are now dont do it unless you need the money.
     
  14. Obi Wan

    Obi Wan

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    This is a good thread at the right time. I'm also in need of doing something with about 50% of my trees - mixed pine and mostly hardwoods (some poplar, etc).

    I've been holding off due to lumber pricing, but with more of the trees dying due to years of drought and now an abundance of rain, I'm going to have to do some cutting in the next year or so, I'm guessing.

    My biggest concern is having a bunch of stumps sticking up afterward since this is my residential property (13+ acres) and not just a place out in the woods. I suspect I'll need to find a logger who'll cut by hand to do it right. I'm told there's a couple of them around this area.

    Keep the great info and advice coming. Thanks.
     
  15. Toml

    Toml

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    Hercules Incorportaed (Powder Company) buys pine stumps in the southeast U.S. $ 5.00/ton earlier this year.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2010
  16. 2@low8

    2@low8

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    You'll be paying him to take your trees if you have a hand crew come in.

    A good hydro-axe operator can cut quite close to the ground but if the quality of the base of the tree is no good he will cut high to avoid the bad wood. That's why you need someone looking over a contract. They need to be held to the terms of what you want done.

    +1 to whover said to save money back for replanting. Think $300 per acre to do herbacide and replanting.
     
  17. Steve0853

    Steve0853

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    I think this is the best advice in the thread if you're dead set on selling. It sounds like you have a lot of hardwoods. A professional forester will let you know if you're gonna get enough to be worth the hassle of getting your timber cut.

    And I have seen some logging companies make a mess of a tract of land. You are the one that has to decide how much money is worth having the timber cut. Even in the best after condition, you have no woods that are fit to walk around in for the rest of your life......unless you are very young.

    To answer your question about the value of hardwoods.....I don't have any idea of current values. Its been a while since I was around timber guys.
     
  18. Mr981

    Mr981

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    Thanks for the replies--great info as usual from this forum.

    Based on the comments here, I called a local guy that is a Registered Forester with about 20 years of experience and he is due to come out later in the week to give me his opinion.

    I already had an Amishman stop buy a few weeks ago and take a look which prompted this thread. I don't pretend to know a Walnut from a Hard Maple with the leaves off so it made sense to contact someone that knows the business of which tree is what and their respective values.

    The "how this is going to get done" was one question that has been one my mind and didn't want to have someone come in and bugger up the land to the point where I'd regret doing this.
     
  19. failsafe

    failsafe

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    A tree cut at ground level will take some doing to get the root out, whereas a tree cut a few feet up will allow a Dozer to push the root system out..
    A stump left in the ground is just plain not wise...Didn't want to say stupid..:cool:
    With the small acerage you have, if you pay attention and mark the trees you want saved, you might generate a little cash...
     
  20. Rabid Rabbit

    Rabid Rabbit

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    You might want to keep a couple for yourself, I'm harvesting some trees myself for personal use. There is a guy with a sawmill and kiln not far away that will turn my trees to useable lumber that will keep me occupied for years to come 900bf Walnut, 1200bf poplar and a couple thousand of sycamore. He charges $0.85/board foot. I thought about selling the lumber but as others above mentioned lumber prices are in the tank. I saw one add for 500bf of 5/4 walnut 10-12ft long for $2.00/bf.