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USAF Vet
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Good thread, I'm interested to see the opinions and the verbal sparing that will begin. The hammer can catch/snag on this like clothing or something can get caught in between the hammer and the frame, this rarely happens but I have heard people argue this.

Striker fired you can see on some guns like the XD with the hole in the back if the gun was fired. The XD has a metal round thing-a-ma-gig that will protrude from the rear showing ready to fire and when its not then the trigger has been pulled.With some hammer fired guns there is a decocking lever but some you have to ride the hammer forward with the trigger being pulled back slowly.

A hammer fired gun also can be used to bang in nails when you are putting up dry wall :rofl: just kidding couldn't resist.
 

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Knowing how to shoot both good= Advantage.

Knowing how to shoot only one type good= Disadvantage.
 

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Not Assimilated
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Hammer pros:

  • Tactile feel for readiness, especially on SAO pistols.
  • Visual indicator if the weapon is cocked or not.
  • In every case I have ever heard of, a hammer transfers more energy to the firing pin.
  • On a DA or DAO style design, the hammer offers a double strike capability of dubious value.
  • On SA C&L designs as the trigger need only trip the sear and the potential energy in the larger mainspring drives the hammer, one usually can get a much better trigger pull on a hammer fired pistol than on a striker fired one.
  • One could, I suppose, cock a down hammer manually to threaten someone if necessary. With a striker fired pistol, you have to shake it at them or something.:supergrin:

Hammer cons:

  • Could possibly snag on clothing though hammers can be modified.
  • Is open to environmental obstruction.
  • There are more parts in the frame in order to power a hammer with a mainspring.
  • On certain designs, the presence of a hammer calls for a DA/SA trigger set-up, which many people loathe.

Striker pros:

  • Creates a more streamlined design.
  • Less prone to be badly exposed to most forms of environmental blockage.
  • It's easier to change out the striker, spring and any sub-assemblies than it is to change the hammer out on most designs so equipped.

Striker cons

  • On many such designs, it is difficult to tell the readiness of the pistol.
  • A striker, by limitations of its design and relatively smaller spring drive, cannot hit a primer as hard as a hammer.
  • The design is incapable of a second strike.
  • Striker fired pistols can often not be field stripped until the trigger is pulled or the sear somehow released, which has proven dangerous to the complacent.
 

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Dungeon Schmuck
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5,892 Posts
A striker-fired handgun can have a more compact internal arrangement than a INTERNAL hammer design. The hammer must have space to move/pivot within the gun, and the hammer itself must have enough length for the driving spring to generate the torque needed to accelerate the hammer.

An EXTERNAL hammer design alleviates these conditions, but the hammer can snag at an inconvenient moment.
 

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With striker you can have a slide closer to your hand and the action is more resistant to debris blocking the action of firing.
 

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G21sf .45 ACP
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to me, the advantages and disadvantages are all up to the opinion of the carrier
 

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That's the striker.
I know that I was just being..........well you read my post :supergrin:
thing-a-ma-gig, really its a striker, no sh-- Sherlock :faint:
again I was being.........well you read my post :supergrin:
 

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Some people like to thumb the hammer on TDA pistols to prevent material from actuating the trigger. It is kind of a peace of mind thing, since there is no manual safety on many(all?) TDA pistols.
 

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Hammer pros:

  • Tactile feel for readiness, especially on SAO pistols.
  • Visual indicator if the weapon is cocked or not.
  • In every case I have ever heard of, a hammer transfers more energy to the firing pin.
  • On a DA or DAO style design, the hammer offers a double strike capability of dubious value.
  • On SA C&L designs as the trigger need only trip the sear and the potential energy in the larger mainspring drives the hammer, one usually can get a much better trigger pull on a hammer fired pistol than on a striker fired one.
  • One could, I suppose, cock a down hammer manually to threaten someone if necessary. With a striker fired pistol, you have to shake it at them or something.:supergrin:

Hammer cons:

  • Could possibly snag on clothing though hammers can be modified.
  • Is open to environmental obstruction.
  • There are more parts in the frame in order to power a hammer with a mainspring.
  • On certain designs, the presence of a hammer calls for a DA/SA trigger set-up, which many people loathe.

Striker pros:

  • Creates a more streamlined design.
  • Less prone to be badly exposed to most forms of environmental blockage.
  • It's easier to change out the striker, spring and any sub-assemblies than it is to change the hammer out on most designs so equipped.

Striker cons

  • On many such designs, it is difficult to tell the readiness of the pistol.
  • A striker, by limitations of its design and relatively smaller spring drive, cannot hit a primer as hard as a hammer.
  • The design is incapable of a second strike.
  • Striker fired pistols can often not be field stripped until the trigger is pulled or the sear somehow released, which has proven dangerous to the complacent.
Depending on the design you can fire SA/DA with a striker fired weapon and not all require the trigger being pulled to disassemble. As for readiness, that doesn't make sense. Sure the hammer is cocked, but is a round chambered? That is the question. If a round is chambered the given pistol is ready to go.
 

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Don't give a damn one way or another. The hammer/striker is probably the last factor that I'd consider for choosing a handgun.
 

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I've seen far too many light strikes to be too enamored by a striker fired gun.
 

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Striker fired is my preference. Lower slide axis without a hammer, but I've yet to own a 1911 .45ACP that a lot of people prefer.
 
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