Halibut receipes

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by noway, May 6, 2003.

  1. noway

    noway

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    hey do me a favor. I'm looking for a decent receipe on cooking Halibut. Every time I try this fish or swordfish, I find myself over cooking it. Any suggestions?

    (Grill or bake)
     
  2. cannoncocker

    cannoncocker unknown race

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    1 tablespoon thai red curry paste
    1 tablespoon thai fish sauce
    1 can coconut milk
    1 tablespoon soybean oil
    1/2 bell pepper
    1//2 cup bamboo shoots
    fresh mushrooms
    little zuccini
    few basil leaves
    Take the soybean oil heat in pot put in curry paste let simmer few minutes throw in fishsauce then coconut milk let boil a little put in veggies.Cook fish in seperate pan simmer pour the curry and veggies over the fish.
    optional= nice rum and coke with a twist of lime
    enjoy
     

  3. noway

    noway

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    Thanks, but I wanted a simpler quick and easy solution for baked or grilled and not asian style, but the red curry does sound nice.

    I spoke with a guy at a bar one day and he suggested coating the halibut and swordfish steaks with mayo to keep them from drying out when grilling. have anybody heard of this?


    My current receipe for halibut consist of a splash of sherry w/worhcestershire sauce, fresh cracked peppercorn and a sprinkle of kosher salt and garlic salt. Bake at 375 for 20-30 minutes flipping it over about 15 mins into the baking. Depending on how thick my cuts are I might go longer or less with the baking times. Served with baked red skins sprinkle with garlic salt and parlsey. Down all of it with a Bass Ale or Michelob Black & Tan.

    Swordfish is about the same but I've been playing around with a hot garlic/honey sauce and or Goodall steak sauce for a quick marinade.

    The problem I'm finding is these saltwater fishs are easy to dry out when cooking, no matter how carefull I'm with the timer and heat, they could be better.
     
  4. tjpet

    tjpet

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    Cover with your choice of seasoning then wrap in tinfoil and bake. They won't dry out at all.
     
  5. Dan in Alaska

    Dan in Alaska

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    Cool! A question I have lots of experience with. Living in Alaska, I get many opportunities to go halibut fishing, and there is usually lots of fish in the freezer.

    When I cook halibut, I usually grill it or fry it.
    Frying is easy. I take the thin fillets and use Golden Dipt brand breading (I buy the 5lb commercial sized bags; they are MUCH cheaper than the 8oz boxes). I add black pepper and Zatarain's brand Creole seasoning salt to the breading mix. For thicker fillets, I cube them into 1-inch x 1-inch cubes and fry them with beer batter. Golden Dipt also makes a very good beer batter mix. Many restaurants in Alaska offer these "halibut chunks" on their appetizer menus.
    The secret to frying is to make sure the oil is hot enough. A "strike anywhere" match (with the white or blue tip) bursts into flames at about 400 degrees Farenheit. A Canadian fishing guide showed me this trick during a shore lunch, and I later check the temp with a thermometer. Once the match ignites, the oil quenches it. Remove the match and start frying. If using a match makes you uneasy, or if you cannot find the "strike anywhere" variety, a thermometer also works well. I try to keep the oil between 375 and 400 degrees.

    The secret to grilling or broiling halibut is keeping it moist. I arrange the raw fillets on a platter and put a thin coating of olive oil over the fillets. The oil helps keep the meat moist, and does not add a flavor or make the fish greasy. I season with black pepper, garlic powder, Zatarain's Creole seasoning, and original-flavor Ms. Dash. I like to grill fillets with the skin still attached to the fillet. I put the skin-side down on the grill, and if I need to flip the meat (thicker pieces), I place the spatula between the meat and the skin (which sticks to the grill) and flip it over and back onto the skin. If the skin has been removed, I use aluminum foil to keep the meat from sticking to the grill. I use the same procedures and seasonings for halibut and salmon.

    I don't bake halibut much, but when I do, I mix 1 cup of mayo and 1 cup of sour cream. I place the fillets in a baking pan, season them with salt, pepper, onion slices, and garlic cloves. I cover the seasoned fillets with the mayo mixture, cover the pan with aluminum foil and bake at 350 degrees for about an hour. The fish is done when the fillet starts to break apart.

    I hope this helps you out. Have fun!
     
  6. noway

    noway

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    Thanks.....

    I knew somebody from Alaska had some good ways of cooking Halibut. I'm going to try the frying method you mention above since I have almost of the stuff plus never had fried halibut.


    That issue with the matches is a new one, but one person I met told me you can't really cook Halibut slowly and hope that it stay moist and not dry. She also mention raising the heat and make sure the grill and oven was hot enough before adding the fish.

    Once again....Thanks!
     
  7. quiet cat

    quiet cat

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    I got this recipe right off the charter boat I was fishing on in Prince William Sound. She cooked a fresh "chicken" halibut for lunch and it was delicious.:)

    Take the halibut fillets and sprinkle both sides HEAVILY with garlic powder (not garlic salt). Dredge in plain flour (on a plate or in a plastic baggie. Place in a pan with a bit of good olive oil on medium - yes, medium. Sprinkle with a bit of lemon pepper and cover for about 5 minutes. Flip over the fillets, sprinkle a bit of lemon pepper and cover for another 10 minutes. The fillets are moist and great tasting. Surprisingly, the garlic is not overpowering.

    I do about once every two weeks with my halibut supply in the freezer.

    Good luck.;f
     
  8. commander

    commander

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    On the gas grill, low heat, season w/lemon pepper (spice) or fresh squeezed lemon juice and pepper. Cook for 2-3 minutes per side depending on thickness. Don't over cook it! That's how it gets dry.;)
     
  9. flygirl

    flygirl

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    I toss on a little lemon pepper,add a small amount of water to to pan and bake. Nothing fancy, as I hate to take away from the taste. Most times I do not "bake" at all, but rather pan fry or grill. Either way just watch it close and when it is firm to the touch it's done. Serve and devour. We eat alot of it as we take out the boat about every other day in season. My freezer is still full.
    Also you can boil it with about 2 cups of sugar and it tastes just like lobster, the kids love that. Come on over. It's time for a Halibut bake.
     
  10. forthehalibut

    forthehalibut

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  11. noway

    noway

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    Have anybody had smoke Halibut?

    I'm trying out different woods in my smokers and was thinking about using Maple or Apple for Halibut. I also have a bag of Cherry that I just picked up a few weeks ago.

    quietcat, I tryed the fried flour battered Halibut and it was okay but I just can't get use to Halibut being fried. Other fishes are more suited for frying ( Catfish/Talipia/Fresh Water Perch etc....)

    I also trying a flour & maize combination with Garlic Salt and it was abit different. The grilled or bake Halibut sounds about right for me.

    DanINAlaska, the Olive oil was the missing trick for me. I used it mainly on my Salamon fillets but never really tried it on the Halibut. First time out the oven it was perfect, until I knock the plate off the kicthen top. I didn't even bother buying the mayo to try it.

    The last 2 weeks I've been eating 3-5 Halibut fillets per week. I'm pretty much Halibut out.....and broke.
     
  12. Mike Hennigan

    Mike Hennigan Millennium Member

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    For the non gifted chef (like me)

    Put the halibut in a covered casserole dish (like corning ware)

    Cover with a can of crushed Italian style tomato

    Throw in some fresh basil

    Cover and cook in the microwave two minutes each cycle. Stop cooking BEFORE it's done and let it rest in the tomato sauce until it flakes softly.
    Always juicy, fast, easy.
     
  13. noway

    noway

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    {Cover and cook in the microwave two minutes each cycle.}

    I'm 35 years old and never in my adult-living away from home, have I ever did cooking in a microwave except a bag of pop-corn, nor own a microwave.
     
  14. pizzaaguy

    pizzaaguy

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    I tried it once...but it's real hard to keep LIT! ;f
     
  15. Dan in Alaska

    Dan in Alaska

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    Smoked halibut is really good. There are lots of ways, but I prefer to use a wet brine when smoking fish. I use Morton's Quick Cure. I follow the directions and usually make a 2-quart batch of brine, and I add 2 cups of maple syrup to it. I soak the fish in the fridge overnight. I have tried different types of wood for smoking, but I always seem to like hickory the best.
     
  16. SkippyThe

    SkippyThe

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    Because you're tender, flakey, and go great with tartar sauce.;f

    That being said I think I'll try the red curry recipe this week. ST
     
  17. noway

    noway

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    {I use Morton's Quick Cure. I follow the directions and usually make a 2-quart batch of brine, and I add 2 cups of maple syrup to it. I soak the fish in the fridge overnight. I have tried different types of wood for smoking, but I always seem to like hickory the best.
    }

    Dan in ALaska, can you tell if any other alternatives exist for this Morton Quick Cure? I tryed about 3 places that I thought might have this but they had no clue. I have a butcher shop that was going to looking into it, they said for me not to try to cure fish meat with plain slat alone.
     
  18. Dan in Alaska

    Dan in Alaska

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    I think the actual name of the Morton cure is "Tender Quick." It comes in a 2 or 3 pound blue-colored bag. I find it in the grocery store, usually in the baking or seasoning aisle. A bag costs about 3-4 dollars. This is a pre-mix cure that has all the salt and preservatives mixed in. I simply add water and any additional seasonings, like maple syrup.

    If you cannot find this stuff, you should be able to find a substitute cure at a butcher supply shop or from a grocery store's meat dept. Many grocery stores make their own sausage and often will sell a couple of pounds of cure to those who ask.
     
  19. noway

    noway

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    Thanks.

    I just smoked a halibut and tuna steak tonight and only seasoned with my typical seasonings and added a few thinly sliced garlic wedges with a strip of bacon on top for added seasoning and moisture.

    Can you say very very good.